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Dental On 11 Year Old


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I have a rehomed grey who is 11. His teeth are horrible. He's scheduled for a dental next week with a possible 15 extractions! I was sure this needs to be done but as time grows closer I'm concerned about putting this older boy through all of this. I would appreciate hearing of any of your experiences or thoughts.

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Others with more experience can provide better info than I can on this, but if you don't know his medical history, you might ask about giving him Amicar before surgery to help control any bleeding. I believe they can also do a clotting test ahead of time to see if excessive bleeding is likely to be a problem.

 

We haven't had to do this, but I have seen it mentioned here many times. If you search Amicar using the search feature, you will probably find a number of previous posts with good info.

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Hi Fudge! I have adopted six greys to date and all have had annual dentals until end of life. All lived into double-digit years. I'm a big believer in dental care.

 

I adopted an 11-3/4 male in 2010 (he was returned to the adoption group with a mouthful of rotten teeth :cry1 ) and the group's vet extracted all of his teeth except the canines. He then lived with me to almost 13-1/2 y/o. Was a happy, happy boy after all those gnarly teeth were removed.

 

I also adopted a senior girl at age 12-3/4. She lived to almost 14-1/2 and while with me had two dentals and did fine - although both times the vet's office called and asked me to come and pick her up early as she was panting and having some major anxiety being crated at the vet's office. She was fine once home. Her second dental was not planned but she fell and "dislodged" a front incisor which messed up her bite so it had to come out!

 

Bad teeth hurt. Rotten teeth, abscesses, etc, are NO fun. Also, two of my dogs each had a loose rear molar - which I would not have known had I not taken them in for a dental.

 

I am hopeful all goes well for this sweet boy. He will feel SO much better in a few weeks. Have faith. :kiss2

Edited by IndyandHollyluv
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I'm not a big fan on doing extensive dental work on older greys. The reason for this is that having a greyhound die either during or after dental surgery is a possibility and is not usually discussed much by the vet. I also don't like that they are pulling teeth that may/may not be OK as you usually don't have a chance to discuss options with them before they do the work. If they are having a problem (infections & loose teeth), then yes they need to have it looked at.

 

If you go this route, you do have to have Amicar just in case.

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Age is not a diease only a number. You can't deny medical care purely on a dogs age. I can show you healthier oldies than some youngsters. Rotten teeth are purely just that-they are full of pus and infection and they hurt. IMO you are doing an injustice by not addressing oral health. Anesthesia always carries some sort of risk however, to reduce the risk a proper exam needs to be performed-+/- thoracic rads, bloodwork done at the time of the procedure or just shortly before, +/- pre anesethic EKG. Any red flags pop up the procedure should be postponed while the abnormality is addressed.

Of course some special considerations will be made per individual--premeds. Induction protocol, fluid rate...... And here's the biggie-please I urge you to question your veterinarian and their techs--question how they perform the entire procedure--this is your dog and you have every right to answers-do they perform intraoral radiographs, monitor co2, blood pressures, temp, Heartrate/pulse--how do they keep their patients warm, exactly who monitors, is there a tech present during recovery...?? If they can't or won't answer your valid questions move on to a clinic that will.

This thread strikes near to my heart today. I was just informed that a friends hound died while recovering from a dental prophy today. I'm devastated to say the least. I'll refrain from other comments regarding this but, it still doesn't alter my view on recommending dental prophys.

The only place for rotten teeth are in the trash can. I highly recommend using Amicar to prevent post operative bleeding.

Ok-stepping off my soapbox. I welcome any questions that I may be able to answer for you.

Edited by tbhounds
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Yikes! Oh my! After reading IndyandHollyluv I was sure we should do the dental....then MaryJane reminded me of the chances of dying which I'm well aware of but just didn't want to consider that happening.

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Thank you for your honesty tbhounds. Bloodwork has been done. He's taking antibiotics. The veterinarian is on the Greytalk list of savvy vets, Dr. Clements. I will call the office Monday and ask the other questions.

Edited by Fudge
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Age is not a diease only a number. You can't deny medical care purely on a dogs age. I can show you healthier oldies than some youngsters. Rotten teeth are purely just that-they are full of pus and infection and they hurt. IMO you are doing an injustice by not addressing oral health. Anesthesia always carries some sort of risk however, to reduce the risk a proper exam needs to be performed-+/- thoracic rads, bloodwork done at the time of the procedure or just shortly before, +/- pre anesethic EKG. Any red flags pop up the procedure should be postponed while the abnormality is addressed.

Of course some special considerations will be made per individual--premeds. Induction protocol, fluid rate...... And here's the biggie-please I urge you to question your veterinarian and their techs--question how they perform the entire procedure--this is your dog and you have every right to answers-do they perform intraoral radiographs, monitor co2, blood pressures, temp, Heartrate/pulse--how do they keep their patients warm, exactly who monitors, is there a tech present during recovery...?? If they can't or won't answer your valid questions move on to a clinic that will.

This thread strikes near to my heart today. I was just informed that a friends hound died while recovering from a dental prophy today. I'm devastated to say the least. I'll refrain from other comments regarding this but, it still doesn't alter my view on recommending dental prophys.

The only place for rotten teeth are in the trash can. I highly recommend using Amicar to prevent post operative bleeding.

Ok-stepping off my soapbox. I welcome any questions that I may be able to answer for you.

 

Hi Fudge! I have adopted six greys to date and all have had annual dentals until end of life. All lived into double-digit years. I'm a big believer in dental care.

 

I adopted an 11-3/4 male in 2010 (he was returned to the adoption group with a mouthful of rotten teeth :cry1 ) and the group's vet extracted all of his teeth except the canines. He then lived with me to almost 13-1/2 y/o. Was a happy, happy boy after all those gnarly teeth were removed.

 

I also adopted a senior girl at age 12-3/4. She lived to almost 14-1/2 and while with me had two dentals and did fine - although both times the vet's office called and asked me to come and pick her up early as she was panting and having some major anxiety being crated at the vet's office. She was fine once home. Her second dental was not planned but she fell and "dislodged" a front incisor which messed up her bite so it had to come out!

 

Bad teeth hurt. Rotten teeth, abscesses, etc, are NO fun. Also, two of my dogs each had a loose rear molar - which I would not have known had I not taken them in for a dental.

 

I am hopeful all goes well for this sweet boy. He will feel SO much better in a few weeks. Have faith. :kiss2

 

 

+2. There's no need for me to even get on my vet box and make a speech.

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Guest FordRacingRon

Age is not a diease only a number. You can't deny medical care purely on a dogs age. I can show you healthier oldies than some youngsters. Rotten teeth are purely just that-they are full of pus and infection and they hurt. IMO you are doing an injustice by not addressing oral health. Anesthesia always carries some sort of risk however, to reduce the risk a proper exam needs to be performed-+/- thoracic rads, bloodwork done at the time of the procedure or just shortly before, +/- pre anesethic EKG. Any red flags pop up the procedure should be postponed while the abnormality is addressed.

Of course some special considerations will be made per individual--premeds. Induction protocol, fluid rate...... And here's the biggie-please I urge you to question your veterinarian and their techs--question how they perform the entire procedure--this is your dog and you have every right to answers-do they perform intraoral radiographs, monitor co2, blood pressures, temp, Heartrate/pulse--how do they keep their patients warm, exactly who monitors, is there a tech present during recovery...?? If they can't or won't answer your valid questions move on to a clinic that will.

This thread strikes near to my heart today. I was just informed that a friends hound died while recovering from a dental prophy today. I'm devastated to say the least. I'll refrain from other comments regarding this but, it still doesn't alter my view on recommending dental prophys.

The only place for rotten teeth are in the trash can. I highly recommend using Amicar to prevent post operative bleeding.

Ok-stepping off my soapbox. I welcome any questions that I may be able to answer for you.

Thank you for this. Not wanting to hijack but I get the OPs concern. My girl is almost 12 and she needs to have a samll tumore removed off on an eyelid. I got a great printout vis a link form someone here when I did a search on Anesthesia and I did what you suggest asking the vet (not my normal one) about putting her out and the vet said everything perfect as per the instructions from a greyhound vet. She then of course told me Leia is not he first greyhound she has ever treated or had to anesthetize.

 

So I would agree with you. I have a high risk almost 12 year old, but I can't see her going through the pain this tumor may be causing her rubbing on her eyeball and just because she is old doesn't make her unhealthy. She walks, is in pretty good shape and I think she deserves to be treated, as does the OPs puppers. Think about how your teeth feel when they hurt.

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My two hounds are both 11+ and both have had dentals (successfully) in the last 6 months. A good vet (that you trust, and that is familiar with the breed if not your specific pup, since I think its new) is key. Amicar is a great idea if your vet will support that (mine hasn't seen its need, but is starting to consider it in his practice). I also love using essential oils in my home ... and Cistus is recommended before & after surgery (go with a great brand though -- Melissa Shelton has some available through her OILY VET site, as does Young Living).

 

The health implications of NOT having a dental scared me more than the fears I had about HAVING the dentals ...

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Until recently (the past couple of years) there have been primarily seniors here. I hate doing dentals on the old ones (on any of them at any age, really), but dental health is so important. My seniors at ages 10-13+ have had dentals and lost many teeth, but relieving pain from deferred dentals (previous owners; between them, these two dogs lost 23 teeth) and keeping up with the others who simply needed them, was worth it. Zeke-aroni had a cauliflower growth on an eyelid and did I want to put him under at 11+ ? No, but it needed to be done. I agree with the post above that age is a number. We can lose them at any age, we just try to do the best we can for them. I would also agree that doing pre-surgical bloodwork is vitally important. Aiden is having a dental next month, he is six. Am I worried? Of course. But he needs it.

 

Good luck to you and your pup. And thank you for opening your heart and home to a senior. They're the best dogs.

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I just had a dental done on my 11 year old boy. He had three teeth pulled. The vet took xrays prior to pulling, so the decision was fact based. She even did gum surgery to save a tooth that was perfectly healthy but the gum had receded too much. He did beautifully, and just stole a peanut butter sandwich from my son, so I assume he is back to normal. :lol

While he was recovering we had to soak his kibble so it got like soggy cereal. We did that for 2 weeks.

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We had to put Benny in for a dental at 9 and 3/4. He needed two extractions. We held off for as long as possible to try to build up some strength and fitness, and to bond with him. It had been years since he'd been done, and I was also incredibly worried. But I'd also promised him when we took him on that we would do whatever was necessary to make him comfortable and it was obvious that he wasn't. So we bit the bullet. Either way, he was unhappy and unhealthy.

 

Since then, he's put on weight, his coat shines, he's full of energy and it was the best thing we could do. He came through the operation really well. The vet is happy. We're happy. Benny is happy.

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I wanted to add now that I've remembered - after I adopted him and before he was brought to me, Seamus had *two* dentals. His teeth were terrible and they couldn't do everything they needed to during the first procedure. I think it was six weeks between the first and second procs, and he was delivered to me a week after the last one. He was 10.8 years old and did *just fine*. As to diet, I've watered down some kibble to make it mushy and served with canned food, or canned food alone the first day or so, it depended on the dog. Even those who had very few remaining teeth managed their kibble without any problem.

Old Dogs are the Best Dogs. :heartThank you, campers. Current enrollees:  Punkin. Annie Oooh M. 

Angels: Pal :heart. Segugio. Sorella (TPGIT). LadyBug. Zeke-aroni. MiMi Sizzle Pants. Gracie. Seamie :heart:brokenheart. (Foster)Sweet. Andy. PaddyALVIN!Mayhem. Bosco. Bruno. Dottie B. Trevor Double-Heart. Bea. Cletus, KLTO. Aiden.

:paw Upon reflection, our lives are often referenced in parts defined by the all-too-short lives of our dogs.

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MaryJane thank you for the link to the old dental thread. It was scary though a few Greys died after dentals 😁

TBHounds - what do the intra oral radiographs show?

Edited by Fudge
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Oral radiographs in the veterinary field are no different than what your own dentist performs. You can see cysts, bone loss, absorption lesions, root decay, extra roots (always my fav because it's rare), loss of attachment --basically, it's a good way in general to just assess the health of the tooth.

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If the dog is healthy except for the teeth, do it! If you don't, heart disease and kidney disease can develop. This is one of those "dam*ned if you and dam*ned if you don't things.

 

If they have a lot of extractions, you can do canned for several days and/or soak the kibble.

Edited by Burpdog

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We had a dental done on our girl Bonny when she was 12 y/o. Our vet generally only recommends dentals for the dogs that need it... and she did. She had a few teeth extracted, but I can't remember how many (single digits). Of course I was concerned due to her age, but our vet said it would be worse to leave those teeth in. Bonny is now 13.5 y/o and still going.

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