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Lump At Vaccine Site?


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A couple of weeks ago, my hounds went in for their annual exam and vaccinations. About a week after this appointment, I noticed that Luna had a lump at the site of one of her vaccines (near her hip). I did some reading, and discovered that this isn't an all too uncommon phenomena, and that, most of the time, they go away on their own. She did not have any other negative side-effects after her vaccines. Has anyone ever experienced this with their hounds? I am trying to understand what the cause might be and whether or not it warrants a trip back to the Vet. While I would usually just bring a pet in for peace of mind, Luna is a tricky case. She is my spooky girl, and going to the Vet is an extremely stressful event for her and puts her back for days after, so I can't make that decision too lightly. Any thoughts on what this could be? Thanks in advance!

Laura, mom to Luna (Boc's Duchess) and Nova (Atascocita Venus).
Forever in my heart, Phantom (Tequila Nights) and Zippy (Iruska Monte).

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Is it her right hip?? If so it's most likely from a rabies vaccine. As you read already they can develop a small localized lump at the injection site. Potentially it can take weeks to a month + to resolve. I would watch that it doesn't enlarge. If it doesn't resolve in a few months you consult with your vet. Sometimes warm compresses help too :-)

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Yes. Needle trauma and injected media reaction can cause them.

Peggy got one after a Noroclav injection in her shoulder, well actually two as there was another undocumented hairless area just above which we now link.

The vet said she was hypersensitive in that shoulder area and would be injected elsewhere in future.

Anyway, this bumb came out as a keratinous/sebaceous cyst, about the size of a pinkie nail, which dropped off after three months. Quite scary.

 

http://www.pbase.com/johnfr/image/141724476

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It used to be on the insert for the rabies vaccination that it should be administered in back of a rear leg. This was so that if something 'went wrong'-which did occur enough to warrant the package insert directions-then they could take the leg and save the dog. Certain vaccines have definitely been shown to cause cancer (flame away ya'll you can't change the facts). The rabies vaccine is what cost me my Minny. There was an unusually high number of adverse reactions/deaths that occurred at the time that his did. Of course the manufacturer was never held accountable for what was clearly a bad "batch". I am not saying to get on the so called nutcase anti vaccine bandwagon. I am saying find legitimate OBJECTIVE research and history and educate yourself. I have seen lumps like you describe NEVER resolve. Hopefully it is nothing more serious but you will definitely need to keep a very close watch on it so it can be caught early if something else more sinister starts to happen with it. So sorry this happenned to her! Give her a kiss for us. It becomes very personal when it happens to your dog I know.

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What racindogs is referring to is vaccine induced sarcomas. Its extremely rare to be seen in dogs-primarily a feline issue pertaining to certain vaccines (ones with adjuvant). Most clinics now offer the adjuvant free vaccines to kitties (Merial offers Purevax). What some kitty owners need to consider is the adjuvant free vaccines are typically one year vaccines (because they are free of the adjuvant) so they might not be appropriate for hard to catch, very fractious or feral cats. If a 3 yr rabies vaccine is what the client wishes to pursue with their cat for whatever reason it is recommended to be given lower in the right hind leg or actually in the base of the tail. It is done that way so if a sarcoma does develop amputation can be performed.

I'm sure what the op's dog has is a reactive site to the vaccine.

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Dawson had this a year ago when he had his vaccines. So, we now give him his vaccines one at a time. He actually developed cellulitis and was very ill. He was on antibiotics for a week and compresses as long as he would let me. Giving them one at a time he did not have any reactions at all! If crying is involved, I would take her to the vet riteawayqwik!

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Yes, it does occur but I haven't heard of it really happening a week out. Happened to Kasey once and freaked me out, so I gave them a call and they said it was normal but if it doesn't subside to bring him back in so they could look to see if it was really abnormal. He was acting fine and it did go away. We try to space out the shots as well so the boys aren't getting several at one time. Keep an eye on it and if it doesn't seem to be getting better give them a call and consider going back in.

Proudly owned by:
10 year old "Ryder" CR Redman Gotcha May 2010
12.5 year old Angel "Kasey" Goodbye Kasey Gotcha July 2005-Aug 1, 2015

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  • 3 weeks later...

I'm a bit late on this update, but probably within a week of writing this post, the lump was substantially smaller. It is no longer visible, but I can still feel a little tiny something if I poke around at that spot on her hip. It never seemed to bother her in the slightest. I'll definitely remember this when the time comes for the pups to get their vaccines next year.

 

ETA: Thank you all again for your responses.

Edited by schultzlc

Laura, mom to Luna (Boc's Duchess) and Nova (Atascocita Venus).
Forever in my heart, Phantom (Tequila Nights) and Zippy (Iruska Monte).

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It used to be on the insert for the rabies vaccination that it should be administered in back of a rear leg. This was so that if something 'went wrong'-which did occur enough to warrant the package insert directions-then they could take the leg and save the dog. Certain vaccines have definitely been shown to cause cancer (flame away ya'll you can't change the facts).

 

I'm way late to this thread, but just wanted to comment on this. I may be wrong, but I'm not aware of any rabies vaccine labels (or any canine vaccine labels for that matter) that specified the location where it should be administered. The recommendations for giving different vaccinations in specific sites (such as rabies in the right hip, DHPP in the left hip, etc) is something that is taught in vet school and suggested by various veterinary organizations as a way to make it possible to tell which vaccine caused a local reaction like what the OP experienced. It has nothing to do with being able to amputate the leg (which wouldn't work with vaccines given in the hip area anyway).

 

As tbhounds mentioned, injection site sarcomas are mostly an issue with cats and are extremely rare in dogs. Recommendations for cat vaccines have included suggestions to inject lower down in the leg (below the stifle/knee), and even in the tail, so that amputation would be possible if an aggressive tumor developed. This is a different issue from the certain vaccines in certain locations concept.

Jennifer &

Willow (Wilma Waggle), Wiki (Wiki Hard Ten), Carter (Let's Get It On),

Ollie (whippet), Gracie (whippet x), & Terra (whippet) + Just Saying + Just Alice

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