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Kingsley And The Cat


Guest GreytScott
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Guest GreytScott

I'm actually quite nervous to post because I keep wondering if I could have done more, but I am already digressing.

 

Before I left my ex's home he brought a new cat home against my wishes, knowing Kingsley is not cat safe. I was quite plain about my disapproval and made it clear I didn't want the cat around. We already had a cat, but that cat was wise to Kingskey's ways and preferred an outdoor life anyway.

 

A couple of days after bringing the new cat home my ex put him outdoors, as he had previously been an outdoor cat as well. However, this cat was not wise to Kingsley and chose to enter the back yard while Kingsley was out there. I won't go into the sordid details but the cat is no longer amongst the living, and Kingsley was not a happy hound at all after what the cat did to him.

 

Where we live now there are several kittens and a mother cat who hang around. Kingsley is always leashed because there is not a fence around the property. While leashed he seems more than capable of reigning in his instincts enough to refrain from lunging and pulling, but he is obviously interested - both ears up, standing stock still. However, I am not disillusioned enough to believe he could leave the cats be off-leash.

 

My question is, is there any possibility of a hound who has already done a cat in ever being able to leave a cat? Any amount of work that could get him cat safe?

 

Has anyone experienced something like this before and successfully gotten their hound cat safe? Or should I just give up the ghost right now and continue taking precautions to protect him and the stray cats?

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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

Outside, nope no chance. My boy Bart is a cat zapper, but lived many years with indoor cats. They understand the difference between their pack and outdoor cats. I wouldnt try to have an indoor cat with my hound then let them out in the yard together, i would expect the hound to kill any cat outside. Not only that, its irresponsible to allow a domesticated pet to roam outside. There is a reason it is a pet, not a feral animal.

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Guest GreytScott

I agree with that last part in general, but there isn't much to be done about the stray cats here, unfortunately. They are too skittish to be gotten near, and appeared out of nowhere (we live in a very rural, woodsy area). And the cat we had all along started as a stray and simply wouldnt accept indoor life at all, and let us know in no uncertain terms how he felt when he was kept indoors during inclement weather. Not that I have any issues keeping a strictly indoor pet, obviously, since Kingsley is. But that is a moot point now, since the ex kept the cat and I only have Kingsley now.

 

At any rate, the kids asked if they could have a kitten sometime soon and I had to veto the idea right off, but wondered if it were *ever* possible to think of a cat considering Kingsley's history and knowing that the cat would be raised all along indoors. Has anyone ever gotten a pup like King to leave cats, or would a kitten be in constant danger? Would it be a constant worry? Or would it be best to just avoid altogether, particularly in case this hypothetical future cat decided to bolt as we were going out the door as I just read in another thread?

 

I guess it's primarily my prerogative as to whether I'm up for the work, just seeking the experiences and general expertise of others.

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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

Yes, my hound is what you are asking about. He has killed cats outside, but lived in harmony with our cats inside.

 

Now, if your hound is not safe with cats inside either, i wouldnt think that he could be "reconditioned" very easily to accept cats inside. I would have trepidation with trying to teach a non-cat hound that cats are ok. My boy Bart tested just fine with inside cats, so we took him knowing his history with outside cats.

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Even if he could be trained to accept an indoor cat, a kitten is probably a whole other ballgame. Kittens move unpredictably, make squeaky prey-like sounds, wouldn't recognize or respect the dog's space, and would be unlikely to respond to a dog's warnings (assuming he gave any).

 

(I assume that's my post you read about the cat bolting, and it probably shaved a few years off my life and maybe the cat's. They've been fine with each other since that incident, however.)

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Rachel with Sweep and kitties Olive and Momo.
Always missing my boys Mud and
Henry

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Guest GreytScott

Indeed it was, ramonaghan! I don't wonder it was terrifying for you. I thought my chest would explode from the stress and fear when Kingsley and that cat began to tussle.

 

Your experience, GDL, is somewhat heartening. Perhaps an adult cat, off in the future, could work.

 

The problem from the beginning has been that our local kennel did little or no real testing, nor do they ever foster hounds. They had shown him a cat in a cage, as far as I was told, and We had a compulsory meeting with Kingsley and the kids, and my ex's dog. He didn't respond in any particular way, so they checked the "safe" boxes and home he came. He's a more nervous dog by nature, so I think what really happened was he was too nervous to react during his cat test. But I refused then and still refuse to bounce him back to the kennel, so I often wonder how much can be done, know what I mean?

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If I were in your shoes, I would not get a kitten for many reasons--but if you feel your children are responsible enough to understand that letting the cat outside is unacceptable, I might consider adopting an adult cat, preferably one who had lived with a dog before.

 

Until such time as your children can be trusted not to let the cat "escape" (I've had cats for years, and never once has one of them gotten out--it's not THAT hard to prevent), I would not get a cat at all.


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Susan,  Hamish,  Mister Bigglesworth and Nikita Stanislav. Missing Ming, George, and Buck

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I would say absolutely no to a kitten. They are so small and prey like. It would have to be an adult cat and it would still be a gamble. Perhaps you could cat test him with a large, assertive cat indoors. Follow the protocol a lot of rescue groups do, muzzle on, leash on, watch his reactions. If he fixates, then I would not get a cat. If he listens to you and is distractable, then it may be possible. I agree about the kids not letting the cat outside by accident as well....and they would have to be separated whilst without adult supervision for a period of time.

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I 100% agree with everyone else's suggestions and concerns.

 

Have you had Kingsley treated by a vet after the attack? Cats carry a great deal of harmful bacteria in their mouths and in their sinus cavities. If your boy was bitten or scratched deeply, he will most likely need antibiotics.

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Guest GreytScott

Yes, and he has healed well and has no scars except for a nick in his ear. It was almost two months ago now.

The more I think on it, the less I think a cat will ever be a good plan. I'd like to be able to tell the kids a cat is a possibility, but my gut is saying no in spite of the small shred of optimism I'm trying to hold onto. It will be quite some time before we're on our feet again as a family unit anyway, so a new pet is totally out of the question, period, until that has happened anyway. But if there ever is a new pet added you could probably put money on it being another grey. That seems like a safe bet, at any rate. I want the kids to be a bit more grown. They understand about not letting the dog out the door, and I've got an x-pen around the front door for extra security, as well as constantly supervising all dog and child activity, but I think I'd be more stressed than I'd really need to be worrying about the dynamic between King and a cat.

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