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The Vet Thinks Dino Has A Mitral Valve Heart Murmur


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So after a somewhat unrelated Vet visit one the vets we see at the Veterinary practices we go to thought she heard a heart murmur in the are of his mitral valve.

 

She asked us to come back so she could check again, as Dino was very nerves and had been there for a while.

 

SO we came back and I tried to keep Dino outside as long as we could to try to keep his anxiety down, didn't really work, and the second vet said she also hears it. This time Dino was more upset then the last visit he did settle a little eventually.

 

So the vet suggested that we visit a canine cardiologist for an ultra sound, I will be calling them and inquiring about a visit.

 

The Vet also suggested that we keep the full out running to a minimum.

 

So my question to all of the Grey talkers, hoe you every heard of a grey having a such an issue and if so do you have any advise.

 

Thank you in advance.

 

Ryan

Dino and Stella

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It is not all that unusual to hear a murmur. Did your vet give it a grade? Most times no action is needed unless clinical signs are seen.

 

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Guest Scouts_mom

Minor heart murmurs are very common with greyhounds. Also their large chests and big hearts cause many vets to think they hear a murmur when in fact there is none. If your vet has trouble hearing it, I won't worry about it unless it gets worse and I won't stop my dog from running and playing. If you want to be absolutely sure, go ahead and support your local cardiologist.

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Although mild murmurs can be reasonably common among greyhounds, if this murmur has never been heard before on previous vet visits there is a possibility it is new, and new murmurs are always worth investigating. Although it is unlikely to need medication at this time if it is very mild it is important to find out exactly where it is and what kind of severity so that it can be monitored over time for progression.

 

Kili has a mild murmur caused by mild mitral regurgitation. She has had it since birth and it has no impact on her anesthetics for surgery or her ability to play sports. That said, I monitor it by ear every year and I will also periodically have her ultrasounded to keep tabs on it.

Edited by krissy

Kristie and the Apex Agility Greyhounds: Kili (ATChC AgMCh Lakilanni Where Eagles Fly RN IP MSCDC MTRDC ExS Bronze ExJ Bronze ) and Kenna (Lakilanni Kiss The Sky RN MADC MJDC AGDC AGEx AGExJ). Waiting at the Bridge: Retired racer Summit (Bbf Dropout) May 5, 2005-Jan 30, 2019

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Ruby has a heart murmur also. The first time the vet said it was a stage 3 and the second visit he and another vet said it was a stage 2. At this point we have chosen not to take her to a cardiologist, at the suggestion of our vet. He said they will put her on meds, that she may or may not need. She is happy and seems healthy and playful. so for now we are just watching her.

Karen

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Heart murmurs are noted pretty frequently with our retired hounds. As already mentioned if it's a new finding it wouldn't be a bad idea to see a cardiologist.

I'm not sure you have this already but, it's packed full of useful information (including heart murmurs)

 

http://www.greyhoundadoptionofoh.org/Greyhound_Health_Packet_08.pdf

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Hope the cardiologist visit can give you a clearer picture of the issue & whether you actually need to restrict Dino running.

 

Both my greyhounds were diagnosed with murmurs grade 2/3 by different vets at our practice, yet the blood bank vets (health check quarterly) & sports vet which both see plenty of greyhounds say they don't.

Edited by moofie
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emily had one as well. it's pretty normal and doesn't seem to have an impact on their life. there used to be a call for greyhounds for a seminar for cardiologist to learn how to use new equipment on, of course i participated with both dogs. emily's case was "classic". the explanation was that thru wear and tear the mitral valve becomes weak over time and there is a slight regurgitation of blood back into the chamber. i was told not to worry- i'm also glad that i didn't spend $$ which could be applied to really necessary care on this.

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I have to agree. Dazie has been diagnosed by more than one vet with a grade 2/3 murmur and we have never been instructed to have it checked further. She's getting older and doesn't run too much anyway so we don't worry to much. Hope your vet is willing to confirm it as low grade for you!

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Opal was just diagnosed on Tuesday from a cardiologist. (she's 10)

 

We had a regular checkup end of May and there was no murmur. She had to go to the ER Labor Day for facial lacerations and they told me she had a 3/6 grade murmur. That was a bit sudden so I took her back to her regular vet who said it was significant now. That ruled out a difference between doctors. So I took her to a cardiologist and she has chronic mitral valve disease.

Right now we aren't doing anything but monitoring her sleeping respiratory rate.

 

My Pearl was diagnosed when she was 5 and given 2-3 yrs prognosis. She was put on meds and lived until she was 12 and died of cancer.

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I wouldn't waste your money on a cardiologist.

 

Grade 2 is considered normal for a Greyhound by those who specialize in Greyhounds, and it's a totally subjective "science," grading a murmur.

 

There is nothing you can do about it anyway--but if you want to spend the money, by all means do if it will make YOU feel better. It won't do a thing for your dog.


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Henry has a heart murmur that varies between 1/6 and 2/6. No one even noticed it until FOUR YEARS after I adopted him and we had to make a trip to the e-vet. His regular vet didn't think much of it, given the fact that he's a retired racer. Of course, if it makes you feel better, go ahead and follow through with the cardiologist. But I wouldn't stress out too much at this point. I'm sure there are some greyhounds out there with legit heart conditions, but murmurs (like thyroid values) seem to be another one of those weird, common greyhound medical idiocyncrasies.

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I haven't had experience with murmurs with greys, but one of our cats, Bruce, was diagnosed with a murmur and recommended to a cardiologist. We suspected stress (to say Bruce hated this vet would be to put it lightly), so didn't go to the cardiologist. A couple of years later we found a vet who we (and Bruce) liked much better; she couldn't hear a murmur at all and explained that sometimes you can hear a "false positive" if he's really stressed out and his heart is beating really fast. I only bring it up since you said Dino was really stressed out during both visits; maybe it could be a factor?

 

River and Indy are sending lots of scritches Dino's way! Or at least River is; Indy is looking for someone to pet him as usual :hehe

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From Bill Feeman's co authored paper:

 

CARDIOLOGIC IDIOSYNCRASIES

Greyhounds may have mildly enlarged hearts and mild heart murmurs that can occasionally be considered normal. The murmur is known as a physiologic flow murmur and is considered idiopathic but most likely relates to turbulent blood flow associated with a high stroke volume.10,11 The physiologic flow murmur can be characterized as systolic (not holosystolic), loudest over the left base, and low intensity (grade III or less)10,11 and must be distinguished from murmurs due to cardiac diseases. Mild generalized heart enlargement is also a common finding in many normal greyhounds, even many years after retirement.

Echocardiographic idiosyncrasies noted in greyhounds include enlarged left ventricular cavity dimensions, increased left ventricular and septal wall thickness, and increased systolic time intervals when compared with nongreyhounds. These differences were significant despite corrections for body surface area and body weight.12 Greyhounds are also known to have significantly higher mean arterial pressures than nongreyhounds (118 mm Hg vs. 98 mm Hg).13

 

Edited by Burpdog

Diane & The Senior Gang

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From Dr. Couto's "Are Sighthouds Really Dogs?"

 

http://www.coutovetconsultants.com/blog/are-sighthounds-really-dogs.html

 

 

From the cardiovascular standpoint, normal Greyhounds typically have a 1-2/6 left-sided basilar systolic murmur (abnormal heart sound caused by turbulent blood flow or swirling) that irradiates into the carotid artery (bruit); this murmur is louder when the dog is excited and has higher sympathetic tone. The murmur is due to the fact that they have a very large left ventricle (cardiac chamber that pumps blood to the body), needed to pump highly viscous blood though the contracting muscles during exercise. However, the diameter of the aortic annulus (“exit door” of the left ventricle) is similar to that in dogs of equivalent size, thus resulting in a murmur of functional aortic stenosis due to high aortic velocity. The larger left ventricle in Greyhounds results in a high vertebral heart score (VHS), and an erroneous diagnosis of cardiomegaly on radiographs. Greyhounds also have higher concentrations of serum troponin I and proBNP (biomarkers of heart disease) than other dogs; they are frequently in the range of a dog with cardiomyopathy.

Greyhounds and other sighthounds (except Irish Wolfhounds) also have high blood pressure. In the 60s, several medical research institutions kept Greyhounds as a model for systemic hypertension in people. A normal Greyhound may have systolic BP of >160 mmHg upon presentation to a veterinary hospital. Greyhounds have a “white coat effect” on BP; normal Greyhounds have systolic BPs in the 160 mmHg range in the hospital, but only 120 mmHg at home.

Diane & The Senior Gang

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Ok you all called it Dino is fine Grade 2 normal for a Greyhound and is cleared for normal . The cardiologist suggest lure coursing.

 

So in conclusion I feel better and am crazy and Dino wonders why we went to a different vet who he like better, I think because they have Windows and conformable beds.

 

Also think I am going to send my vet a lot of Grey specif info she may hate me after that.

 

Kris let Indy and River know We have lots of pet for them, I might even let River chew on a leash.

 

Thanks everyone.

 

Ryan

Dino and Stella

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River says, "Oh goodie, I love chewing on leashes!"

 

Ok you all called it Dino is fine Grade 2 normal for a Greyhound and is cleared for normal . The cardiologist suggest lure coursing.

 

Glad the news is good and Dino's okay! Funny you should mention lure coursing; there's a local group with a meet this weekend at Oatlands that we were planning to check out. You're welcome to join us if you like! http://www.champlurecoursing2.org/CHAMP_EventsPremiums.htm

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I wouldn't waste your money on a cardiologist.

 

Grade 2 is considered normal for a Greyhound by those who specialize in Greyhounds, and it's a totally subjective "science," grading a murmur.

 

There is nothing you can do about it anyway--but if you want to spend the money, by all means do if it will make YOU feel better. It won't do a thing for your dog.

 

I'd have to respectfully disagree with this. A grade 2 murmur *can be* normal for many greyhounds, but that doesn't mean all grade 2 murmurs are normal. The only way to know for sure is with an echo, which I'm glad the OP had done. Also, it's not true that nothing can be done about it. If an echo reveals underlying heart disease that is causing the murmur, there are often options for treatment, depending on what the abnormality is.

Jennifer &

Willow (Wilma Waggle), Wiki (Wiki Hard Ten), Carter (Let's Get It On),

Ollie (whippet), Gracie (whippet x), & Terra (whippet) + Just Saying + Just Alice

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I'd have to respectfully disagree with this. A grade 2 murmur *can be* normal for many greyhounds, but that doesn't mean all grade 2 murmurs are normal. The only way to know for sure is with an echo, which I'm glad the OP had done. Also, it's not true that nothing can be done about it. If an echo reveals underlying heart disease that is causing the murmur, there are often options for treatment, depending on what the abnormality is.

One of the main reasons I chose to go get Dino checked, was a member of the message board I am on with my adoption groups experience.

 

His hound has heart disease causing his hounds murmur, but the medication that his hounds need to live a normal health life totals to $10 a month, so I figured better safe then sorry. No will I be spending $600 every year with no cause, probably not, but if things change or get worse I will get Dino the care he needs to be happy and healthy.

Kelly

 

this looks like so much fun, Niki and I have a lot of work to do around the house prepping for Cole's first B day party.

 

I have been told its a big deal, and there is a lot of prep to be done.

 

I don't understand but I like to be happy and healthy so I do what she asks :hehe

 

Thanks

Ryan

River says, "Oh goodie, I love chewing on leashes!"

 

 

Glad the news is good and Dino's okay! Funny you should mention lure coursing; there's a local group with a meet this weekend at Oatlands that we were planning to check out. You're welcome to join us if you like! http://www.champlurecoursing2.org/CHAMP_EventsPremiums.htm

Dino and Stella

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