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Guest Muscovy
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Guest Muscovy

Hi folks,

 

We've had our retired racer for 3 weeks now (his last race was in late June), and he really seems to be feeling the heat. We've had our first two warm spring days this week, and he's panting like crazy. Even on cooler days, he seems to pant for a long time after zoomies (like for about 15 mins after coming inside to lie down, and breathing quickly for around 45 mins after he stops panting).

 

Today it's warmer, around 81 degrees F (27 C) outside and 77 F (25 C) inside, and he's panting like a maniac. Wetting him down completely with a hose seems to help, but he's dry again in under an hour. I have no problems doing this for him while I'm home, but my husband and I both work full-time and I'm beginning to worry about how he will cope when we're not here.

 

I've put a kiddie pool outside for him, which he stands in, but he won't sit down in it (yet). Perhaps he will when it gets warmer, or when he gets more comfortable about being here with us.

 

It's not likely to get any cooler for the next 9 months, and it will definitely get hotter when summer rolls around. I'm taking him to the vet next week for a general 'new dog check over and worm test' and I will ask about the prolonged panting/heat issue then, but I'm wondering if you good grey folk have any tips or secrets about keeping your dogs cool when you're not home? Or if he's likely to get used to the heat after a while of living the pet life?

 

My last grey never panted this much, and wasn't bothered by the heat until it got up around the 95-100 degree F (35-40 C) mark, but we'd had him since he was a tiny pup so he never raced.

 

Thanks :)

Edited by Muscovy
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Greyhounds in general are rather sensitive to the heat. Turn on your air conditioning and don't worry! He'll be OK. Good idea to have the vet check him though. My last hound melted if it was over 70 degrees!


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Susan,  Hamish,  Mister Bigglesworth and Nikita Stanislav. Missing Ming, George, and Buck

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We never had air conditioners in our house until we got Greyhounds. Then it became a necessity. Because of their physiology, they are less able to regulate their body temperature - either hot or cold - and some are just super sensitive to heat and/or cold.

 

Even having one room with a window air conditioner will give him a place to go to escape the heat while you're gone during the day. Even fans will help if that's all you have.

Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

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Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

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Guest Muscovy

Thanks folks :) The thing is, at the moment our pups stay outside when we're not home. I work 12 hours shifts, which means I'm gone for 13.5 hours on work days, and I think that's going to be way too long to leave my (very active) hounds inside for!

 

We don't have a doggie door, and we can't have central aircon due to our home's weird design. I can certainly install a doggie door somewhere (I think... This house is unusual! Although DH is very opposed to this due to his paranoia about security), but we've already had an aircon guy come over to look at putting in a unit and he basically said it wasn't going to happen. We have a ceiling fan upstairs that doesn't do much, and some pedestal fans that we move around to keep cool (ish). But that's the best I can do at the moment :(

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Guest greyhound_in_LA

I would install a doggie door for potty breaks and put an AC unit in one room of the house that can be the cold room. It may be a bedroom with the door just slightly wide enough for the dog to go in and out. It's not ideal, but it's a lot better than heat outside and inside.

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Has anyone had luck with cooling blankets or jackets? The kind where you wet a towel or fabric to drape over the dog?

I've tried wetting Mercury down with water while out walking. Can't say if I know whether it made a difference.

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Missing my heart dog Liberty, the world's best blackngreylabhound

 

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Since you haven't replied, I am guessing the problem has been solved. I've heard about home made swamp coolers. (Yes, this is new to me, but it makes sense.) Fill one or two, one liter bottles with water, then freeze them. Put frozen bottles in front of a fan. Pick fan speed, and rotation at your discretion, and put it in the shadiest, coolest part of your home. I have never tried this, but I think it makes sense. I hope you found a solution.

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Guest Muscovy

I've just come back from the vets, and asked about the heat sensitivity/breathing thing. He's not overly concerned, which is good, but suggested we monitor this for his first summer with us. Obviously if anything changes, we'll be back at the vets. But he just seems to think it's a case of "every dog is different".

 

Since we can't have AC installed, I think a swamp cooler/doggie door combo is our best bet for this summer. Once we renovate our upstairs area next year, we can have an AC unit installed in our (new) bedroom, which will be just the ticket, I'm sure, but until then we will follow the other suggestions given here.

 

Thanks everyone :)

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We never had air conditioners in our house until we got Greyhounds. Then it became a necessity. Because of their physiology, they are less able to regulate their body temperature - either hot or cold - and some are just super sensitive to heat and/or cold.

 

Even having one room with a window air conditioner will give him a place to go to escape the heat while you're gone during the day. Even fans will help if that's all you have.

 

Agree.

 

Greyhounds are at higher risk for deadly heat stroke/hyperthermia. They really need to live as indoor dogs. I believe some dog doors have a security chip the dog can wear on a collar to activate the locked door.

 

Our Greyhounds can tolerate shady, outside temperatures up to the low 70's fahrenheit (21 - 22 celsius) before they begin to show signs of suffering from heat.

 

Car travel can be especially risky for Greyhounds. Parked cars in shade can increase to dangerous temperatures within 5 to 10 minutes, even with windows partly open.

 

Please read this important link re: heat stroke/hyperthermia:

http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&A=366

Edited by 3greytjoys
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