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Couple Questions About New Grey


Guest Lygracilux
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Guest Lygracilux

Hello all. I know I have only had Fusion a couple days now..but I just want to make sure I am training right and making him comfortable.

Two questions (for now):

 

1. His first night here, we had him sleep in his crate for the night. Our crate is in the kitchen facing our room about 8ft from our bed so he can see us. He made a fuss for a little bit but settled down until about 3am when he started barking/whining. So we let him out and he did pees and poops. Put him back in the crate, he barked and whined but settled down and didnt wake up til about 7am that morning.

Yesterday I had the day off, so I let him run around outside in the yard, fed him, took him for walkies and put him in the crate while I took about a 2 hr nap. I wanted him to get used to being in there while we are out and about. He again whined, barked ect for about 10 mins then took a nap too.

We have this corner in our living room where we put his bed, toys, blankies etc. After being let out of the crate he spent all day on his bed in that spot.

We have a conjoined living room/dining room then a doorway which we put a baby gate up, then our kitchen, bedrooms, bathroom.

Now last night, he was on his bed in his spot and we went to take him to put him in the crate for bed time...he would NOT budge. Even with treats. We didnt want to make him upset or feel nervous from taking him away from his safe spot and he is very sensitive. So we decided to extra puppy proof the living room and dining room, put a muzzle on him and leave him out free for the night to see how it went.

He was wonderful. He stayed on his bed all night, no whining, barking, and didn't make a peep until 6:30am to be taken out. He also hasnt had one accident in the house-and every time I let him out in the yard he goes in his spot. But he will not go on walkies yet.

 

My question was-should we enforce the crate rule still? Or just forget about it and let him stay free in the living room, with a muzzle for a while because of kitties? He cant see us from the living room, and he didnt mind...so maybe it actually may help with being left alone during the day too...and he REALLY loves his spot. I just didnt know if there was a certian amount of time you should crate...or try to crate?

 

2) He doesnt like his feet touched. He got poop on them yesterday and I tried to wipe them off and he went bonkers. Any idea on how to get him used to having his toes touched?

 

 

Thanks so much guys!!!

 

ps: here he is in his spot :)

 

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Edited by Lygracilux
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Guest normaandburrell

I would like that spot, too!

Seriously, if he is happy there, I think you can let him stay there. We didn't crate either of our greyhounds, just when we fostered, and even then only when we left the house. Our adoption group encourages getting away from crates as soon as you feel you can trust the dog. We did have two dog beds, one in the living room and one in the bedroom. So you may want to consider another bed, especially if he shows evidence of wanting to be in the bedroom with you.

As far as the feet, handle them just a little, praise and treat. Repeat often, handling them a little more each time.

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Such a handsome fella!

 

I can't answer the crate questions beyond this: if he does fine out of the crate and you're okay with him not being in the crate, it's probably safe to say that you don't need the crate. I'd keep it up and accessible for a while in case he decides he wants a cave-like hidey spot, but it sounds like everyone (human and canine) will be fine without it.

 

As to the feet, start slow. Get a treat (little pieces, or smear some peanut butter on your hand so he can lick it as you're touching) and treat him as you're touching his lower leg, then paw, while the paw stays on the ground. When he gets used to that, slowly work on picking up his foot while treating, then feeling each toe while treating, and so on. Baby steps! If there's an emergency (like he gets a cut or something gets stuck between his toes) and you need to manhandle his paw for whatever reason, put some peanut butter on the inside of his muzzle, muzzle him, and do whatever you need to do.

Mom of bridge babies Regis and Dusty.

Wrote a book about shelter dogs!

I sell things on Etsy!

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What a cutie! Yes if he likes his bed, I would let him stay there. And Roo has given you good advice re his feet.

Clare with Tiger (Snapper Gar, b. 18/05/2015), and remembering Ken (Boomtown Ken, 01/05/2011-21/02/2020) and Doc (Barefoot Doctor, 20/08/2001-15/04/2015).

"It is also to be noted of every species, that the handsomest of each move best ... and beasts of the most elegant form, always excel in speed; of this, the horse and greyhound are beautiful examples."----Wiliam Hogarth, The Analysis of Beauty, 1753.

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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

did you say you have cats? if you do, then if he is not in his crate, the cats should be behind a closed door, no if ands or butts when you are not awake or home to directly supervise.

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Guest Lygracilux

Thank you guys! I figured we should just let him stay where he feels comfortable. We have no problem having him not in the crate, wed prefer it that way actually-its just happening a little sooner than anticipated.

 

did you say you have cats? if you do, then if he is not in his crate, the cats should be behind a closed door, no if ands or butts when you are not awake or home to directly supervise.

 

 

We have no room with a door we could put him in, unless we moved him in the bathroom. But that would defeat the purpose of his safe spot hes already made.

His prey drive is very very low. Hes sniffed the cats a few times under supervision with a muzzle and has no interest in them (esp after a little swipe from my vicious Nim) I even think hes a little scared of them :flip Also when we took a walk yesterday- a tiny white fluffy dog bolted up to us unleashed, and Fusion just stood there, sniffed and tail wagged. I was petrified he was going to killll it lol

 

We have the baby gate raised, the cats stay in the kitchen/bedrooms until they're comfortable, and he will be muzzled. Only one cat has ventured in so far and he looks at her but doesnt even raise his head. If he shows any interest we say "no kitty" and he lays back down...

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Guest SaltiDawg

Question. Would I be correct to assume FUSION had his nails clipped in the past without a bunch of people to hold him down. Would approaching him from the rear/side and reaching down to gently lift a rear paw back be a smart thing to do?

 

Newby here!

Edited by SaltiDawg
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Guest Lygracilux

Question. Would I be correct to assume FUSION had his nails clipped in the past without a bunch of people to hold him down. Would approaching him from the rear/side and reaching down to gently lift a rear paw back be a smart thing to do?

 

Newby here!

 

I have no clue how they did it...thats how i tried to wipe his feet though. On the side facing his rear and just lifting his paw up (like picking a horses hooves) He didnt like it much haha

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On the crate, I would let him stay on his bed since he seems to prefer that and there haven't been any problems. Some dogs like their corsets, but it sounds like he isn't one of them :) As for the cats (I know you didn't specifically ask :) ) I would continue to watch him closely, and either crate him or put the cats behind closed doors when you are not home, but other wise, it sounds like he will be fine with them. Just remember that as he gets more comfortable in your home, over the next few weeks/months, his attitude *may* change. It probably won't, didn't with any of mine, but I have seen it happen, so just stay alert for awhile.

 

Many dogs don't like their feet messed with, I have no idea why. As Roo said, take it slow, treat a lot, and he will probably get better. Remember, you are still very new to him. If he never gets really comfortable with you handling his feet, you can always pay someone to clip,his nails :)

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It's a bit soon to say if you will or won't need the crate, and some of it will be up to you and your comfort level. It appears you may not need it, BUT Fusion's personality will change throughout the next several months as he settles into home life and becomes more comfortable.

 

He's staying on his bed now because he feels safe there, not necessarily because he *likes* it per se. He will begin to explore more and move around the house on his own, then you will find out where *he* wants to be! Most likely he will want to sleep in your bedroom - not all greys do, but most of them. He may also become more interested in your cats, particularly as they become more comfortable with him and begin to move around the house themselves. Make sure everyone has ample excape routes and hiding places, and don't let the cats bully the dog!

 

Some greys just have ticklish feet. Slow and steady, as described above, will be better. This is also a matter of trust for him - to have someone he doesn't know picking up his feet. This may resolve itself too.

 

Time and patience. Patience and time.

Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

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Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

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Guest Lygracilux

It's a bit soon to say if you will or won't need the crate, and some of it will be up to you and your comfort level. It appears you may not need it, BUT Fusion's personality will change throughout the next several months as he settles into home life and becomes more comfortable.

 

He's staying on his bed now because he feels safe there, not necessarily because he *likes* it per se. He will begin to explore more and move around the house on his own, then you will find out where *he* wants to be! Most likely he will want to sleep in your bedroom - not all greys do, but most of them. He may also become more interested in your cats, particularly as they become more comfortable with him and begin to move around the house themselves. Make sure everyone has ample excape routes and hiding places, and don't let the cats bully the dog!

 

Some greys just have ticklish feet. Slow and steady, as described above, will be better. This is also a matter of trust for him - to have someone he doesn't know picking up his feet. This may resolve itself too.

 

Time and patience. Patience and time.

 

 

Thank you for the information. We will still have the crate up for a long while then. Wether he uses it or not. Do you think he will suddenly become aggressive towards the kitties? Or maybe just show more interest as in "lets be friends" ? They have lots of hiding places, tall cabinets, under the beds, etc. And we will always keep a muzzle on him and baby gate up when unsupervised, so that will help.

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Thank you for the information. We will still have the crate up for a long while then. Wether he uses it or not. Do you think he will suddenly become aggressive towards the kitties? Or maybe just show more interest as in "lets be friends" ? They have lots of hiding places, tall cabinets, under the beds, etc. And we will always keep a muzzle on him and baby gate up when unsupervised, so that will help.

It's not really aggression, it's predatory behavior, but yes, there is a concern that as he gets more comfortable or more likely as the cats get more comfortable around him and thus become more active his interest in them as potential prey could increase. The main thing that's likely to peak his interest is the cats running away from him and it doesn't sound like that's happened yet. I wouldn't want to leave cats and dog unattended before I saw how he reacted to that specifically, especially because if he went after them, that chase would in and of itself be reinforcing and make your job harder (vs. you being there to interrupt the behavior before he had a chance to take off and reward him for doing something more appropriate like paying attention to you).

 

It's not unreasonable to wean a dog off of a crate quickly if he seems to prefer being uncrated and isn't doing anything problematic like having accidents or chewing, but I would keep the cats separate when you're not there to supervise for a longer period. If you don't have a door to do it, then doublestack baby gates or get a tall x-pen that you can spread across an opening to give them a safe space with litter, food, & water that the dog cannot get to. The one other thing to consider is what if you need to crate him in the future. What if he does start to show increased interest in the cats, or he gets injured and needs to be on crate rest, you have guests or visiting dogs and want to keep him separate, etc. Having a dog who is truly crate trained can be a huge help and if you don't do it now, it probably won't happen.

 

Just some things to consider before you make a decision. I've certainly had fosters/adopted dogs who walk into my house and from day 1 I have no qualms about their interactions with the cat or anything else. They're few and far between, but they do exist. ;) And honestly, it sounds like your boy might be one of those dogs. But it's pretty early to say. FWIW. :)

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Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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Guest Lygracilux

It's not really aggression, it's predatory behavior, but yes, there is a concern that as he gets more comfortable or more likely as the cats get more comfortable around him and thus become more active his interest in them as potential prey could increase. The main thing that's likely to peak his interest is the cats running away from him and it doesn't sound like that's happened yet. I wouldn't want to leave cats and dog unattended before I saw how he reacted to that specifically, especially because if he went after them, that chase would in and of itself be reinforcing and make your job harder (vs. you being there to interrupt the behavior before he had a chance to take off and reward him for doing something more appropriate like paying attention to you).

 

It's not unreasonable to wean a dog off of a crate quickly if he seems to prefer being uncrated and isn't doing anything problematic like having accidents or chewing, but I would keep the cats separate when you're not there to supervise for a longer period. If you don't have a door to do it, then doublestack baby gates or get a tall x-pen that you can spread across an opening to give them a safe space with litter, food, & water that the dog cannot get to. The one other thing to consider is what if you need to crate him in the future. What if he does start to show increased interest in the cats, or he gets injured and needs to be on crate rest, you have guests or visiting dogs and want to keep him separate, etc. Having a dog who is truly crate trained can be a huge help and if you don't do it now, it probably won't happen.

 

Just some things to consider before you make a decision. I've certainly had fosters/adopted dogs who walk into my house and from day 1 I have no qualms about their interactions with the cat or anything else. They're few and far between, but they do exist. ;) And honestly, it sounds like your boy might be one of those dogs. But it's pretty early to say. FWIW. :)

 

Thank you so much for all of that.

I think I will have my fiance buy a door for that doorway the baby gate is at as there are hinges to where a door used to be... that way we can just close the door when we arent home, so the kitties will be on their side and he will be on his. I think we will still practice crate training, even if its an hr or two a day. Just so he knows it.

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When I adopted Brady, I had a cat Ms India. His initial reaction was what are you?

 

When he came into the house, she was curled up on a dinning room chair and he sniffed her walked around the table and went back to the chair. This time he stuck his nose under her belly and she whacked him hard on the nose (It sounded like she had hit a hollow log and she was d-clawed so no nails). His eyes got big and he ran and laid down on the dog bed in the living room.

 

I did not have a crate, but eventually got one for training, leaving the door open. I choose to baby gate him in my kitchen when I was a work. The gates were raised about 6-8 inches from the floor so Ms India could come and go as she pleased. My kitchen was long and narrow and his crate was in the dinning-room with the open door side in the kitchen.

 

My bedroom, bath and den was on the second floor and so he would come upstairs with me, dog bed in den and one in the bedroom. I wanted to bond and be near him after being gone for 8 hours working. I put a baby gate to block him from the stairs because I was afraid he fall at night.

 

At night every time he moved his tags would jingle and Ms. India would be laying on my chest or back, and hiss at him in a warning not to come to the bed. He'd reposition himself and go back to sleep. I used to come home for lunch to walk him and after about 3 months I forget to put the baby gate up when I left and everyone was fine, eventually I stopped using the baby gate to separate them.

 

It took Brady 6 - 8 months to find the litter boxes. I baby gated him out of the room on the second floor and baby gated the stairs to the basement where the second one was. He got into them twice and it was scary. He eat the poop but also urine clumps. His poops were like cement for a couple of days.

 

Fusion is so handsome congratulations on your new addition.

 

Debbie

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The handsome boy Brady, mid-morning nap. The sun, the sun feels so, so, so good.

I can't keep my eyes open ... ... Retirement agrees ...

... and the Diva Ms India, 2001 - 10/16/2009 ....

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I agree that he doesn't need a crate. As long as the kitties have a safe escape route and you keep him muzzled until you completely trust him with them, let him be free. He may change over the coming months and want to see you when he sleeps, but it sounds like you can accommodate that. To help him bond, I'd suggest putting another bed in or near your bedroom. At night make it a routine that he gets a special "good night" cookie and say, "Let's go to bed!"and put that cookie on his bedroom bed. Even if he doesn't go at first, he may eventually.

 

Regarding touching his feet, there are some wonderful dog foot massage techniques that have won over every dog I've had. I always wait until the dog is relaxed lying down/sleeping and I'll sit on the floor near him, ignoring him except for loving touches all over. Then I work down the legs and scratch the backs of the front legs and slowly get to the feet. There's a little hollow behind the pads that can be massaged as well as the spot between the pads. If you work slowly and make the touches casual he will eventually love it. An especially tasty treat while you're doing this couldn't hurt. Don't focus on the feet too much at first - scratching that backs of the legs is like a tranquilizer for my dog (and all before him). When you get to the point that he accepts this, take a soft towel and use it to rub his legs and feet and he lies next to you, then tuck that towel near his head like a pillow.

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Guest CleverJason

 

Thank you so much for all of that.

I think I will have my fiance buy a door for that doorway the baby gate is at as there are hinges to where a door used to be... that way we can just close the door when we arent home, so the kitties will be on their side and he will be on his. I think we will still practice crate training, even if its an hr or two a day. Just so he knows it.

I think this is very wise. Just to share a cautionary tale, when my grey was in his foster home, he showed no interest in cats for quite some time. But unfortunately, there was a moment when he was excited about something else, the cat made the wrong move too closely to Baron and his prey drive kicked in unexpectedly. He was considered "cat safe" until that unexpected moment. Fortunately for Baron, I'm allergic to cats and can't have them in my home, so it's not a major concern for me. But I urge you to be overly cautious for at least the first five or six months, even if it seems unnecessary. Fusion is still scared and settling in, so you're not seeing his full personality yet. He may begin showing interest in the cats suddenly. Or not at all. But I'd be extra careful.

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As others have read many times about my Annie: She was out of her crate by the end of day 2 post adoption, and after the first muzzled introduction to my cat to see how she would react, she was never muzzled again, and they were never separated. Annie had no interest in the cat 3 years ago and still has no interest. She also has no interest in small, yappy dogs (other than to want to get away from their yappiness); no interest in squirrels, chipmunks or the rabbits in the backyard. She is one of the few that has zero prey drive.

 

Having said that, though, I am still careful around small live things, such as others' dogs, especially if there are 3 or 4 big dogs around. One Greyhound may be totally passive with no interest in something small, but a group of larger dogs can easily turn into a pack intent on bodily harm. Do I think Annie would join in? No, I don't, but better safe than sorry.

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Guest Lygracilux

Thank you everyone. He seems to be doing well- Last night he slept in the living room again, with a muzzle and baby gate up. He did great! Started whining at around 5:30am (he didnt poop before bed) So we let him out. He didnt go but I think its because we put the harness on him. He doesnt seem to like to go pee or poo with the harness on. Went back to bed until 6:30, let him out again with collar and he did pees and poops!

Still no accidents in the house, and a couple kitties have been venturing in. He seems semi interested but not enough to chase or get out of bed to inspect. Just looks at them (esp the big fluffy one that likes to prance around up and down on furniture) His gaze is easily swayed though.

 

Now, starting yesterday he will NOT go up the front steps anymore, there is only 4 of them and they are big. Even with nice smelly chicken, persuasion, trying to move his legs up and down. He will actually cry if I try and move his legs, big baby. I think it is more of the doorways that are creeping him out, because he will walk up them and once he gets to the door way he just backs down them again. We eventually just have to pick him up-which is a pain as I am only 5' 3' and 120lbs...

My mom who will be home with him today is 4' 10" and 95lbs...so this may be an issue, she will let me know how it goes.

 

Any other methods on stair training?

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Guest Lygracilux

Also, he will NOT go in the kitchen when we are home, and Id like him to explore a little more... because the crate is in there. He really hates that thing, and will just whine at the door way then go lay back down/ Should I just take it down for now?

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If he's shown an aversion for it, and if you dont think you'll use it again, then take it down. Jen (NeylasMom) had some good reasons (above) to have your dog crate trained, so think this through first.

 

Don't worry about or press him to explore more than he's comfortable with at this point. He'll do it when he's ready. You can encourage him with yummy treats and positive reinforcement, but he just may not be ready yet.

 

As for the stairs, keep encouraging him and being positive about all interactions involving the steps/door. Just be matter-of-fact about it - he's got to go in and out, so he needs to use the door. Can you take him in and out - just walk him back and forth through the door without going up/down the stairs? Treat, treat, treat each time. Have a little party when he does it right. You may need to find another super duper treat just for this - smelly cheese, or liverwurst, marshmallows (which is what is used in the racing kennels), jerky or slim jims.

Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

35764734494_93de5b5963_b.jpg

Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

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Guest Lygracilux

If he's shown an aversion for it, and if you dont think you'll use it again, then take it down. Jen (NeylasMom) had some good reasons (above) to have your dog crate trained, so think this through first.

 

Don't worry about or press him to explore more than he's comfortable with at this point. He'll do it when he's ready. You can encourage him with yummy treats and positive reinforcement, but he just may not be ready yet.

 

As for the stairs, keep encouraging him and being positive about all interactions involving the steps/door. Just be matter-of-fact about it - he's got to go in and out, so he needs to use the door. Can you take him in and out - just walk him back and forth through the door without going up/down the stairs? Treat, treat, treat each time. Have a little party when he does it right. You may need to find another super duper treat just for this - smelly cheese, or liverwurst, marshmallows (which is what is used in the racing kennels), jerky or slim jims.

 

I will try again tonight just to see if he will go into the crate for a few mins at a time, but still let him sleep where hes is comfortable. Just crate train him so he will be okay for a few hrs here or there if need be.

 

Oh great, I will try all the treats. There is our entry door, a big mudroom, a glass door then the stairs outside. He doesn't like our entry door way or the glass one. So maybe even just walking in and out and in and out of our door way. I saw some training videos about using like a lower butt/abdomen harness to help hoist his back legs when he reaches for the treats on the stairs? Thats what hes struggling with are his bag wobbly legs. Any thoughts on that?

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Thank you everyone. He seems to be doing well- Last night he slept in the living room again, with a muzzle and baby gate up. He did great! Started whining at around 5:30am (he didnt poop before bed) So we let him out. He didnt go but I think its because we put the harness on him. He doesnt seem to like to go pee or poo with the harness on. Went back to bed until 6:30, let him out again with collar and he did pees and poops!

Still no accidents in the house, and a couple kitties have been venturing in. He seems semi interested but not enough to chase or get out of bed to inspect. Just looks at them (esp the big fluffy one that likes to prance around up and down on furniture) His gaze is easily swayed though.

 

Now, starting yesterday he will NOT go up the front steps anymore, there is only 4 of them and they are big. Even with nice smelly chicken, persuasion, trying to move his legs up and down. He will actually cry if I try and move his legs, big baby. I think it is more of the doorways that are creeping him out, because he will walk up them and once he gets to the door way he just backs down them again. We eventually just have to pick him up-which is a pain as I am only 5' 3' and 120lbs...

My mom who will be home with him today is 4' 10" and 95lbs...so this may be an issue, she will let me know how it goes.

 

Any other methods on stair training?

 

As long as you know he's not being hurt by moving his legs, make him go up the stairs by moving one leg after the other. Remember: You're the human and he's the dog. It might not be easy on you but he needs to know that you have certain requirements and going up the stairs and through the door is one of them.

 

Annie had issues with doing certain things. The first time I visited my son and DIL, who live in a high-rise apartment building with an elevator, Annie was **terrified** of the elevator, but we weren't going to walk up/down flights of stairs so I literally pushed her into the elevator every...single...time she had to go out and then, of course, come back in. By the beginning of day 3, she was walking into the elevator as if she had been doing it her whole life. She also had a major issue with the entrance to my sister's house. We went up 3 stairs to the porch. The front door opened into a small, and rather dark, hallway, at the end of which was the piano room. It took Annie a couple of visits before she'd willingly walk into the hall from the front porch. Again, she had to do it because it was the only entrance she could use. When there is no other choice, you'll find a way.

 

 

Also, he will NOT go in the kitchen when we are home, and Id like him to explore a little more... because the crate is in there. He really hates that thing, and will just whine at the door way then go lay back down/ Should I just take it down for now?

 

I forget how long you've had your boy, but it can take a while before a Greyhound is comfortable enough to explore.... or he may never explore. Again using Annie as an example: In the house I moved from a year ago, she never went into the dining room and only went into the kitchen to get to the back door. She also wouldn't go into either bathroom, though both were big enough. In my new house, she won't go into the kitchen, and barely walks into the dining room and then only to with great encouragement from someone sitting at the table. It took her a couple of months to get brave (?) enough to walk into the office where I sit at the computer. Re the crate: If he's not using it, my advice is to take it down.

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Guest Lygracilux

 

As long as you know he's not being hurt by moving his legs, make him go up the stairs by moving one leg after the other. Remember: You're the human and he's the dog. It might not be easy on you but he needs to know that you have certain requirements and going up the stairs and through the door is one of them.

 

Annie had issues with doing certain things. The first time I visited my son and DIL, who live in a high-rise apartment building with an elevator, Annie was **terrified** of the elevator, but we weren't going to walk up/down flights of stairs so I literally pushed her into the elevator every...single...time she had to go out and then, of course, come back in. By the beginning of day 3, she was walking into the elevator as if she had been doing it her whole life. She also had a major issue with the entrance to my sister's house. We went up 3 stairs to the porch. The front door opened into a small, and rather dark, hallway, at the end of which was the piano room. It took Annie a couple of visits before she'd willingly walk into the hall from the front porch. Again, she had to do it because it was the only entrance she could use. When there is no other choice, you'll find a way.

 

 

 

I forget how long you've had your boy, but it can take a while before a Greyhound is comfortable enough to explore.... or he may never explore. Again using Annie as an example: In the house I moved from a year ago, she never went into the dining room and only went into the kitchen to get to the back door. She also wouldn't go into either bathroom, though both were big enough. In my new house, she won't go into the kitchen, and barely walks into the dining room and then only to with great encouragement from someone sitting at the table. It took her a couple of months to get brave (?) enough to walk into the office where I sit at the computer. Re the crate: If he's not using it, my advice is to take it down.

 

 

Thank you, thank you.

I know this will all take time, and time is all I have...kind of-He's just my first grey and I'm like a psycho mom hoping I'm doing everything right, and not scaring him and just trying to get him to do things without pushing his limits.

 

This will be our 4th day together, hes such an angel I really cant complain. I just feel bad for having to have my tiny mom hoist him up the stairs when the fiance and I arent home (I can just see it, and its a sad/funny sight)

The first night he was here (before we put the crate up) he was all for exploring, and...now that he knows the big bad crate is in there-he wont come in haha. Unless we carry him up the back steps which leads from the yard to the kitchen. Then he walks verrrrry far around his crate to get back in the living room to his spot.

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I will try again tonight just to see if he will go into the crate for a few mins at a time, but still let him sleep where hes is comfortable. Just crate train him so he will be okay for a few hrs here or there if need be.

 

Oh great, I will try all the treats. There is our entry door, a big mudroom, a glass door then the stairs outside. He doesn't like our entry door way or the glass one. So maybe even just walking in and out and in and out of our door way. I saw some training videos about using like a lower butt/abdomen harness to help hoist his back legs when he reaches for the treats on the stairs? Thats what hes struggling with are his bag wobbly legs. Any thoughts on that?

Why are his legs wobbling? Because he's scared or because there's a medical issue? Either way, that's not normal and forcing him isn't likely to solve the problem.

 

Are the floors something other than carpet in this entryway (tile, vinyl, hardwood, etc.)? Between this and the aversion to the kitchen, which I'm assuming is also smooth flooring I think that may be your problem. In which case, putting down some non slip rugs or carpet squares would solve your problem.

 

Regarding the crate, if he doesn't like being in the kitchen in teh first place, I certainly wouldn't try crate training him there. Why not move the crate to the living room, near where his current bed is. And load it up with comfy bedding as well so it's as appealing or even more appealing than the bed. Then you can start crate training him. You might start by just "hiding" really stinky treats in it when he's not looking. You could also feed him his meals in there. Literally ask him to go in, give him his food, shut the door, and then open the door to let him out as soon as he finishes.

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Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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