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Do You Need A Crate? (Bringing Home A Grey Soon)


Guest KatieAlice
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Guest KatieAlice

Im adopting a greyhound that is in a foster home on the 26th and I was wondering if a crate is required, no exceptions. I never crate trained any dog and I never liked the idea even though I know it really isn't cruel or anything like that.

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Guest snowpuppy

If she's coming from a place that requires that you have a crate...its likely that she's been exposed and crate training has started. I'm a huge fan of crate training because we travel and bring our dogs camping with us, our dogs do occasionally need veterinary care and every so often we send them to the groomers rather than grooming them at home. In all of those situations they can end up in a crate of some sort, and I really don't think its fair to fail to train them to be comfortable in that situation. I mean a trip to the docs can be pretty stressful for a dog, and if there's an emergency I don't want to add to that stress when I can pre-emptively avoid it. There's also the chance that your new friend might not know the rules of your home...like no chewing on electrical cords when the humans aren't home to tell me no, and unsupervised and crated is safer until those rules can be taught, established, and reinforced.

 

If your new friend isn't crated, here's an article to get you started: http://www.ddfl.org/sites/default/files/crate-train.pdf

 

Familiar things, treats that take a while (and are only given in crate so that the association between crate and goodness is cemented in), a soft flannel blanket with some culinary lavender inside (you can make these yourself pretty cheap), etc. Don't worry! It'll be fine. Congrats on your new furry family member.

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Guest FoolishLemming

I was in a similar mindset before we got our grey. I wasn't real sold on the idea of crating him, but we got the crate and set it up before bringing him home. The first night we brought him in, he was pretty nervous, did a lot of panting and pacing, and was completely uninterested in the fluffy dog bed we set out for him. The crate however, was immediatedly his sanctuary. We never had to lure him in; he just immediately recognized it as his safe place.

 

We still don't regularly crate him, but we keep it set up because it makes him feel comfortable. Take that for what it's worth. They are all different.

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When I first adopted Brady I did not have a crate. I restricted him with baby gates to my kitchen. I also had a kitty at that time, and had the baby gate raised about 8 inches off the floor so she could visit but also had a way out. He was not a jumper. They could get to know each other.

 

When I hired a dog trainer to work with me, I got a crate. It makes training easier and gives your hound a safe familiar space. Because I baby-gated the kitchen I never had to restrict him to his crate only.

 

He would hord his toys in the crate, it was cute. When Ms India (the kitty) spent more time in the crate then he did I decided to reclaim the floor space back and use baby gates only.

 

I felt the same way about crates but it made a huge help in training. Retired greys go through so many changes when they come off the track, a crate sometimes is sometimes the only thing that is familiar to them and can be a comfort to them as they transition into your family.

 

Debbie

Edited by bradymom

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The handsome boy Brady, mid-morning nap. The sun, the sun feels so, so, so good.

I can't keep my eyes open ... ... Retirement agrees ...

... and the Diva Ms India, 2001 - 10/16/2009 ....

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Kasey hated the crate, Ryder LOVED it. Every dog is different. If the adoption agency suggests a crate and no exceptions, it's likely in the best interest of the hound.

Edited by XTRAWLD

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10 year old "Ryder" CR Redman Gotcha May 2010
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Nixon's crate was his safe place.

For the first few days he wouldn't even eat unless he was in it ... with the door shut.

He soon discovered the comfy beds became more at ease in the house and we soon took the crate down.

 

Ruby and Nigel were not crated at all when they arrived.

 

Nancy...Mom to Sid (Peteles Tiger), Kibo (112 Carlota Galgos).   Missing Casey, Gomer, Mona, Penelope, BillieJean, Bandit, Nixon (Starz Sammie),  Ruby (Watch Me Dash) Nigel (Nigel), and especially little Mario, waiting at the Bridge.

 

 

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No cages here. I have a greyhound who would kill himself trying to escape being locked inside a cage. Not all greyhounds like cages.

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Tricia with Kaia the wolfhound-schnauzer mix
Always missing Murray MaldivesBee Wiseman, River, Hopper, and 
Holly Oaks Holly
“You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows.“ -Bob Dylan

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Our first greyhound needed her crate to feel comfortable because she was so timid. We eventually weaned her out of it. Our next 3 did not want to have anything to do with the crate even though 2 were crated at their foster home, and one came from a kennel on a farm.

 

My guess it depends on the greyhound. Our pups have been to the vet where anesthesia was required so they were crated and they were fine, even though we don't have crates here, so they're not used to them at all. I'm not convinced crate training is necessary just in case of the above scenarios.

Jan with precious pups Emmy (Stormin J Flag) and Simon (Nitro Si). Missing my angels: Bailey Buffetbobleclair 11/11/98-17/12/09; Ben Task Rapid Wave 5/5/02-2/11/15; Brooke Glo's Destroyer 7/09/06-21/06/16 and Katie Crazykatiebug 12/11/06 -21/08/21. My blog about grief The reality is that you will grieve forever. You will not get over the loss of a loved one; you will learn to live with it. You will rebuild yourself around the loss you have suffered. You will be whole again but you will never be the same. Nor should you be the same, nor would you want to. Elisabeth Kübler-Ross

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You might ask if the group you are getting the hound from has a loner crate. The group we rescued from lent us a crate so we could see if Pixel would use it before we put the money into buying one. It was really helpful.

 

This is what I was going to suggest. Some smaller pet supply places might have them as well. We bought a $140 jumbo crate from Petco when we got Jake, and he spent about 2 days in it because he would whine all day (we set up a webcam because we're crazy). Once we gave him the run of the bedroom and eventually the house, he was and is just fine being alone while we're at work. Luckily they took the crate back!

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Photographer in Phoenix, AZ www.northmountainphoto.com

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When we adopted out first greyhound in 2003, we bought a large crate because everyone told us we had to have one. Our first greyhound ended up being a bounce, and she never needed a crate, since she was used to being loose in the house. The crate stayed in it's original box, in the garage, through the adoption of seven other greyhounds, until we got a puppy in Dec 2011. She quickly outgrew her puppy size crates and we ended up setting up the large one when she was about 4 months old. We had to eventually get a larger crate when she outgrew the first one. And then we had a recent foster who needed to be crated at our house for his own safety. So we used two crates for a while.

 

None of the other greyhounds we currently have ever use the crate in any capacity, even thought it's just sitting there with the door open. Lilly now only uses it when we leave the house, and will probably soon grow out of it, too.

 

They can be useful tools. But not every greyhound will need one. Some will feel better with one available. Some, like Murray, will absolutely hate them.

Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

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Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

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No crates here except for medical reasons or as dens with the door open. As suggested see if you can borrow one. I hate to think of how many dollars have been spent on crates that were recommended by adoption groups and used for a week or so. They say "your dog is used to being crated at the track" but a huge crate at the track with around 70 of his/her closest friends around is a whole different ballgame than alone in a small metal crate in your house.

I am not trying to be mean but think that crates for greys are vastly overrated. I have been specifically asked to foster greys that injured themselves to get out of crates as I don't automatically crate.

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We borrowed a crate from our group while we fostered Sweep and then bought our own when we finalized the adoption and knew she didn't mind it. We have cats so it was a very helpful tool for us, but of course baby gates and other means work for that too. I agree with others that there's no need to invest in one until you know your hound likes it. We no longer crate Sweep when we leave the house, but it's still up with the door open and she'll hang out in there periodically. We also take it with us when we're staying with out-of-town relatives with small animals as a just-in-case measure. (Mainly, though, it's now a surface on which I temporarily stash stuff until I have time to put it away. :lol)

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Rachel with Doolin, feline rivals Tootie and Richard, and squatter cats Crumpet and Fezziwig.
Always missing gentlemen kitties Mud and Henry, and our beautiful, strong, silly
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Greyhounds weren't my introduction to crate training. Many years ago, I had a huskyxshepard mix that a coworker, after hearing my then husband and I lament about the difficulty housebreaking, loaned us one and taught us about crate training.

 

When I was adopting Sammi, I bought a crate. We used it the first 2 nights, after 2 sleepless nights, we brought her bed into the bedroom and gated her in with us (in that home, the bedroom was too small for a crate that large, plus collapsing it and moving it every morning and night to and from the bedroom wasn't going to happen unless there was no other way. I used the crate during the day while at work for about a year. Then one night I was coming in from work with my arms full of laundry (I dropped off my suits at the dry cleaners) and didn't see a hot wheels car. I stepped on it and slid. Ended up crashing into Sammi's crate with her in it. From then on, she wouldn't go into it. Funny thing, I still traveled with it. Many hotels have the idea that the designer purse breeds are too cute to be destructive, yet a large breed requires one. So the hotel personnel see the crate, feel better, and Sammi's bed is dropped on the floor next to the hotel bed.

 

I still have the crate, it's in our storage room. When we adopted Lynni & River on the same day, DH and I discussed the crate and our options. Lynni, in a foster home that crated. River, fresh off of the track and at the adoption kennel, also used to her own "apartment". We decided to try the first night without the crate, but if one of them needed it, we would get it.

 

6 weeks later, it's still in the storage room.

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Guest KTPrime

I think I used Optimus' crate a grand total of 2 times. He absolutely, positively hated that thing, and would howl for hours when I put him in it. I let him out of the crate and he was perfectly happy and content to snooze all day. That said, I'm glad I have it (in storage) in case there was ever an emergency and he needed to be crated for transportation (like if there were floods and we had to go elsewhere. Not very likely in our area, but with global warming, who knows?)

I know most dog people seem to agree crates aren't cruel, but honestly, I've never been able to get around that idea entirely. I know dogs often make "dens" for themselves, but that seems different than being locked in a fairly small space where they can't come and go as they please. I'm just not a huge fan. If we ever get another pup, I'll probably use babygates as opposed to crating if we need to confine for any reason.

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I also never bought one because I had the benefit of being off of work and home all the time when I got Teague so I could always supervise him. I thought I would see how he did before I got one, and I am happy I did because it would have been a waste of money. Having said that, there are many situations in which a crate (or some sort of confining) is necessary. If you are going to be working right away, or you have a dog that is insecure or destructive, a crate can definitely be helpful. I don't have an opinion on them one way or another, I think it depends on your lifestyle and the dog.

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Guest greyhound_in_LA

Im adopting a greyhound that is in a foster home on the 26th and I was wondering if a crate is required, no exceptions. I never crate trained any dog and I never liked the idea even though I know it really isn't cruel or anything like that.

 

I had a crate from previous dog, and my new greyhound has always been kenneled, so he is used to a crate as a den. I don't use the crate during the day when home, but the crate is open all the time, and he goes in it by choice at night to sleep all night. I don't shut the door. The only time I might use it now is when I am running the vacuum or steam vacuum, which is loudish.

 

The crate is really a safety spot just in case.

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The crate was invaluable to us when each of of our two first came home. With Joe, because he's a nosesy-pants and was getting into everything. With Brees, because Joe kinda wanted to eat her! It's mainly used as a den (door open) by Brees now, but Joe will go in when he's playing musical beds. I recently used it for Brees at night when we had a Shih Tzu staying with us that she sometime forgot wasn't a bunny.

 

Snowpuppy's point about crates at the vet is valid. Even you just crate the dog briefly at random intervals, it will make them less likely to flip out if they have to be crated for medical reasons. I think having one is a good idea. It may be a waste of money and space, but it may also be a great tool.

 

And then, there are dogs like Tricia's Murray. When she says he'd kill himself to get out of a crate, I believe her 100%. That *isnt't* the norm, but it happens. (And Murray is the best, best dog!)

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Guest CleverJason

Talk to the foster parents. My grey never once set foot in his crate...I guess he'd had enough of being cooped up for one lifetime. But they're extremely helpful during the transition if you get a dog that likes them.

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I never used a crate with my greyhounds in their early days, they were gated into the kitchen when unsupervised so any mess or damage was limited.

 

It was only due to the lurcher we had on foster that we got a crate. Pru was naughty unsupervised & i knew she had been crate trained by the rescue. Pru if left loose in living room with other 2 jumps the 4ft dog gate to get into the kitchen or upstairs.

A week or 2 after I got the lurcher's crate, my greyhound injured a spinal disc & was on crate rest for a month so had to buy a 2nd crate, she accepted it fine considering I didn't train her, but expect as a racer she'd had some time in similar while travelling or for magnetic treatment as was relaxed ( UK racers generally not kept crated but kennelled, often in pairs). I have to admit they're useful to have but do take up a lot of room & heavy to move about.

 

Bought ours cheap on an eBay store, suprisingly many secondhand ones were around same price probably as they paid double originally at the local pet stores, but I didn't have the time to hunt out a bargain.

Edited by moofie
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Congratualtions on your future new Greyhound! :)

 

Just my opinion that the valuable benefits of having a crate available are many, especially for a new dog. The wire crates fold down to about 3" deep if desired for travel or storage. If a cat (or other small animal) is part of your family, a crate is extremely important for most newly retired racers.

 

A new dog's safety is most important. Also great for house training, keeping dog safe when home workers, young children or other animals visit. All my dogs have been provided regular dog beds, plus the option of (open door) crates for 40 years. Crates have enabled our dogs (and cats) to travel with us safely to events, hotels, homes of friends or family (who may have unfamiliar or smaller animals), stay in pet-sitters' homes, veterinary hospitals, etc.

 

 

 

Our pups have been to the vet where anesthesia was required so they were crated and they were fine, even though we don't have crates here, so they're not used to them at all. I'm not convinced crate training is necessary just in case of the above scenarios.

 

Highly crate-anxious/stressed dogs' body temperature can elevate too high in the veterinary hospital even before surgery, and/or during recovery while dogs are recovering from anesthesia. A hound's highly elevated body temperature pre-surgery increases risk of hyperthermia during surgery, and during recovery. Some veterinarians will cancel surgery if a hound becomes too stressed/overheated in the kennel/crate pre-surgery.

 

It's safer for highly crate/kennel-stressed hounds to be scheduled first in-line for surgery, or to arrive later -- just in time for pre-surgical meds, and then picked-up ASAP from recovery (i.e., try to avoid leaving a highly crate sensitive hound waiting around at the veterinary hospital too long.) This lesson was provided to me by a veterinary hospital who handles thousands of Greyhounds for surgeries.

 

 

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Guest FreeholdHound

After 2 yrs Harry uses his crate every day for afternoon naps & sometimes sleeps in it at night. It's rotated in with his other beds (2) depending on his mood. Door open/closed he never cared. It does take up a lot of real estate , but I've covered the whole thing & we use it as a buffet for snacks when guests are over.

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If you get a crate, I would get the open wire one, so they can see you. we had the plastic closed one in the past and all our greys hated it. Crates are a must if you are getting a young dog as no blanket, book, CD, i.e. anything is off limits to their chewing when you are gone! Also the potty thing, dogs don't do their business where they sleep.


If you get a crate, I would get the open wire one, so they can see you. we had the plastic closed one in the past and all our greys hated it. Crates are a must if you are getting a young dog as no blanket, book, CD, i.e. anything is off limits to their chewing when you are gone! Also the potty thing, dogs don't do their business where they sleep.

Life stages is a great crate, about $70? and folds up easily for transport. Maryl sleeps in it every night and naps often during the day with the door open. I think she likes the "this is my space" feeling.

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