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Things To Check


Guest Addictivestyle
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Guest Addictivestyle

The adoption agency here let's a potential greyhound stay over at your home for a few days before adopting to make sure it's going to be a good fit before you actually adopt. This should be happening pretty soon for me, any ideas on things I should do/activities that would be good during this time period?

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Guest sireltonsmom

Please put painters tape eye level on any sliding glass doors for the visit. Raise the feeder - putting on a box or other temporary item is fine for now. I use a metal plant stand that is 14-16" high. Tight leash and just enjoy your adventure. Let us know how it goes.

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Adding to what Brandiandwe said about checking for red flags, if they are going to be home alone because everyone works outside of the home, I'd do a mini session of leaving them alone in the home. Some dogs are cool with being home alone, some like a TV or radio on. Some can get distressed, become destructive or very vocal, or have accidents. They aren't accustomed to being completely alone. If you have close neighbors (apt/condo) and the grey will be home alone because of work, that would be something you'd want to know if they can handle.

 

Also, unless you are meticulous about cleaning of counters, tables, etc... all the time be prepared for a counter surfer. Some don't ever try. Some are curious, but get the idea quickly that it isn't something you approve of. Some will help you in your goal to keep a clean, non cluttered home.

 

Houseplants within reach? Make sure they aren't poisonous. Again, not all greys are the same. Some ignore houseplants. Some think it is their personal salad bar. Some won't eat them, but take one look at the potted plant and think it is an indoor yard for them to dig, and possibly try to potty, in.

 

Most greys aren't very playful with stuffed toys right away. Some are as soon as they walk in.

 

Other than that, look to do things with them that you will continue to do with them.

Are you wanting a hiking buddy? Take them for a long walk. Not a full blown hike (some have to work up to that distance).

Are you wanting a jogging buddy? Same as the hiking, they may have to work up to the distance that you are used to, but a mini version to see how it goes is okay.

Are you wanting the poster child for "45mph couch potatoes" that will sleep most of the day like a 80 pound cat? Or are you wanting a more active hound to interact and play with?

 

Basically, try to do activities, even if they are scaled down for time, that your normal day will consist of. If you like to sit and watch a marathon of Netflix and not be interrupted, go for it! If you're out in the backyard working on projects or your garden every evening, do it! Be observant, but don't change your routine too much, as you're wanting to see if you and the grey fit in reality, not just for a sleepover.

 

ETA~ Yes! Painters tape, or even sticky notes to show where windows are can be very helpful, especially to a hound that has never been in a home environment before. They may not see the glass window pane right away, it's a hole in the wall.

Edited by Gryffenne
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Guest AbbyH

I'm a total newbie. We've had our first for just over two months. Still I can echo what I have read and heard many places. That is, you will not see your greyhound's true personality for around two months. For us it has all been for the better. Much of what we experienced in the beginning we now know was born of nervousness. She appeared calm, responded well to us and slept well but now she is much more so in all of those categories. I guess I'm saying that if it goes well early it will probably be even better over time. At least that has been our experience.

 

Also, if there are no serious red flags, you may want to forgive some minor problems and chalk them up to the fact that he/she has never been a pet before.

 

For them it is a little like an alien abduction.

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We're pretty new too, and the one piece of advice I'd give is that it's normal to feel like you don't know what to do. We didn't have a home visit and when we got Jake home he just stood in our kitchen looking at us and my husband and I were both like "what do we do now?" Just let him or her follow you around and go about your normal life, as Gryffenne said. Good luck!

Edited by NeedlenoseJake

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Photographer in Phoenix, AZ www.northmountainphoto.com

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If you don't have a fenced in yard for pottying, be aware that some greys are not used to pottying while on leash/attached to a human. It can truly be a tiring experience if you have to walk and walk and walk and try not to be there anytime they look like they might be thinking of pottying. Even if you do have a fenced yard, you might want to see if he/she will potty when on leash (just in case you travel or something happens to your fence and it is suddenly required). This may be a deal-breaker for some.

 

If you do have a fenced yard, walk the dog around the yard at first to introduce him/her to the area so he gets the lay of the land and watch the dog when he/she is out there. Check for any areas that might cause snagging or tripping if the dog should decide to zoom around. Holes, sticks, slippery areas can be dangerous to a dog who doesn't know the area.

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