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Guest IrskasMom

Said Person is not on GreyTalk and I don't want NO Flames or harsh Words. On Sunday June 29 I last seen this Pup and he was limping slightly . He has been limping for quite some time but it was of and on . He was taking , because of my urging , to the Vet twice and then on Tuesday July 1 he was seen by an Orthopedic Specialist that confirmed my Suspicion ( the horrific Word "Osteo Sarcoma " ) My Question to her was "what did he ( the Specialist ) recommend for his Pain Regiment / Management " . She ignored my Question . By Wednesday Night , I saw his passing on Facebook .It was more then a Shock to see this . I am devastated .First of all , I loved him so very much and personally , I thought , he was not there yet. But I want to say , everybody is different in their Grief and prospect of Pain . Was it the right Time or right Thing to do by him . Please tell me , as I had always to this Day second Thoughts about my Irska. Now I have second Thoughts about this said Pup.

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Everyone is different. Without being privy to the visit with the specialist, I can only speculate.

 

She may have ignored your question because the answer was too painful, or she didnt want criticism knowing that the next day was The Day. :( Her pup's cancer may have been too far progressed, inoperable, something else compounding the issue, etc... for anything but being helped across the bridge.

Edited by Gryffenne
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Really depends on the owner and the dog.

 

Honestly, if one of mine were diagnosed with osteo, I might not even bring the dog home again. If I did, it would likely be only to have a few days of ice cream and steak dinners before saying goodbye.

Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
We miss Reko Batman (Trouper Zeke x Marque Louisiana), 11/15/95-6/29/06, Rocco the thistledown whippet, 04/29/93-10/14/08, Reko Zema (Mo Kick x Reko Princess), 8/16/98-4/18/10, the most beautiful girl in the whole USA, my good egg Joseph aka Won by a Nose (Oneco Cufflink x Buy Back), 09/22/2003-03/01/2013, and our gentle sweet Gidget (Digitizer, Dodgem by Design x Sobe Mulberry), 1/29/2006-11/22/2014, gone much too soon. Never forgetting CJC's Buckshot, 1/2/07-10/25/10.

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The x-rays might have showed a hairline break or showed that a catastrophic break was impending. And the problem with pain meds is that they make dogs feel good enough to romp and play--which can lead to a horrendous break for a dog with osteo. If you have to spend your dog's last days keeping it on leash and restricting it from running and playing as it wants, is it worth it for the few extra days? Sometimes it is--when you can supervise your dog and spoil your dog rotten. But if you have a job, you'll live in horror of coming home to find your dog broke its leg while you were gone and suffered in pain for an unknown number of hours--or bled out or died of shock if an artery was damaged by the break.

 

My girl broke her leg in my living room--and at least I was home when it happened. We had no suspicion that she had cancer, and cancer didn't show on the x-ray, but what else breaks the leg of a dog like that? I'd have done anything to spare her that break and the pain and fear she suffered in the next 24 hours (because we didn't suspect cancer, they operated the next day to implant a pin in the bone; she threw a blood clot and died in surgery). I'd have done anything--including letting her go earlier than someone else might think is right.

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Kathy and Q (CRT Qadeer from Fuzzy's Cannon and CRT Bonnie) and
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Missing Silver (5.19.2005-10.27.2016), Tigger (4.5.2007-3.18.2016),
darling Sam (5.10.2000-8.8.2013), Jacey-Kasey (5.19.2003-8.22.2011), and Oreo (1997-3.30.2006)

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There is no cure for osteo. Amputation may or may not be an option for various reasons. After having lost my heart dog, Faye Oops, to this dreaded disease, I believe that you're never wrong letting them go a day too early.

Laura with Celeste (ICU Celeste) and Galgos Beatrix and Encarna
The Horse - Gracie (MD Grace E)
Bridge Angels Faye Oops (Santa Fe Oops), Bonny (
Bonny Drive), Darcy (D's Zipperfoot)

 

 

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Everybody is different. Osteo does not go away and maybe she wanted to save her dog from tremendous pain. I've lost all of my greyhounds to osteo and was always told that no matter how much of their pain we witness, the dog is experiencing much more than we will ever see.

Edited by robinw

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Xavi the galgo and Peter the cat. Missing Iker the galgo ?-Feb.9/19, Treasure (USS Treasure) April 12/01-May 6/13, Phoenix (Hallo Top Son) Dec.14/99-June 4/11 and Loca (Reko Swahili) Oct.9/95 - June 1/09, Allen the boss cat, died late November, 2021, age 19.

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:bighug it is hard to lose a dog you love, whether it is yours or someone else's (there are GT dogs that I still miss, and I never even met them in person) Each person, each dog, each situation is different, and I have to believe that the owner knows their dog and their situation better than anyone else, and respect their decisions.

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The x-rays might have showed a hairline break or showed that a catastrophic break was impending. And the problem with pain meds is that they make dogs feel good enough to romp and play--which can lead to a horrendous break for a dog with osteo. If you have to spend your dog's last days keeping it on leash and restricting it from running and playing as it wants, is it worth it for the few extra days? Sometimes it is--when you can supervise your dog and spoil your dog rotten. But if you have a job, you'll live in horror of coming home to find your dog broke its leg while you were gone and suffered in pain for an unknown number of hours--or bled out or died of shock if an artery was damaged by the break.

 

My girl broke her leg in my living room--and at least I was home when it happened. We had no suspicion that she had cancer, and cancer didn't show on the x-ray, but what else breaks the leg of a dog like that? I'd have done anything to spare her that break and the pain and fear she suffered in the next 24 hours (because we didn't suspect cancer, they operated the next day to implant a pin in the bone; she threw a blood clot and died in surgery). I'd have done anything--including letting her go earlier than someone else might think is right.

 

I agree with every word of this. So sorry to hear about your girl, KF. It would be one of my fears. :(

 

Really depends on the owner and the dog.

 

Honestly, if one of mine were diagnosed with osteo, I might not even bring the dog home again. If I did, it would likely be only to have a few days of ice cream and steak dinners before saying goodbye.

 

Again, I agree. In fact, two of our dogs were diagnosed with inoperable cancer and we chose not to bring them home again. I only wish that I had known sooner for both of them so that I could have spared them some suffering.

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Guest PiagetsMom

Really depends on the owner and the dog.

 

Honestly, if one of mine were diagnosed with osteo, I might not even bring the dog home again. If I did, it would likely be only to have a few days of ice cream and steak dinners before saying goodbye.

 

These are my feelings as well. I've always asked my DH, in the event that I ever find myself in this position, to remind me of those feelings - because I've been down the road of a broken leg at home, and I do not want to go down that road again. Better a day too soon, than a day too late.

Edited by PiagetsMom
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I agree with Batmom.

 

You CAN cut your dog's leg off, irradiate him, fill him with chemicals, and HOPE you get another year or 18 months. Or you can accept that osteo is a painful, progressive disease and put an end to the dog's suffering.

 

People like to write about what a "fighter" their dog is. The dog has no choice. The dog isn't given the option to refuse the treatment. It's the owners who fight. I think, given a choice, most dogs would opt to go sooner rather than be subjected to all the treatment.

 

I'm not saying it's wrong if you choose aggressive treatment. But I wouldn't.

 

George had an ultrasound a year or so ago. I told the vet if she found cancer, to call me while he was still under because my intention was to put him to sleep without ever waking him. I personally think it's a kinder option. Dogs cannot possibly understand why all the things that need to be done in an aggressive course of action are being done. The fear, pain, and stress--is it worth it TO YOUR DOG? I doubt it.

 

Just my 2 cents.


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Susan,  Hamish,  Mister Bigglesworth and Nikita Stanislav. Missing Ming, George, and Buck

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All the above.

 

In addition, as much as we don't want to consider it, the cost of aggressively treating cancer is staggering (close to $20,000 dollars for our boy) and many people simply can't.

 

You have to consider a lot of factors in a very short amount of time when your dog is diagnosed with osteo, especially if there's a catastophic leg break involved. It's stressful and scary and really overwhelming. No matter what *I* think should be done, I would never presume to second guess anyone else who has to make this decision for their dog and their family.

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Really depends on the owner and the dog.

 

Honestly, if one of mine were diagnosed with osteo, I might not even bring the dog home again. If I did, it would likely be only to have a few days of ice cream and steak dinners before saying goodbye.

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I had Tucker put down at the visit where the diagnosis was confirmed. He limped off and on, and was treated for a sprain. He was fine again for a week or so, then began to limp and knuckle under. Rads showed well advanced osteo in his shoulder. The vet was surprised that the bone could still support him. My vet agreed that he was not a good candidate for amputation. This was a dog who was terrified at the vet. His stress level stayed high for hours after he came home from a routine check. Shaking, panting, refusal to eat. He would also vomit every time he went for a car ride.

I had four large dogs, including a hyper hundred pound golden. I worked full time. The dogs used a doggie door during my time outside the house. There was no room in my 900 sf house to isolate one dog. I was terrified that he would break a leg and be in pain alone for hours. It could happen in the house without the others around. It could happen when two tried to go through the door or down the steps together. There was no way to predict or prevent a break. I loved my dog too much to chance it. He didn't deserve to have his last hours spent in agony. It was my choice, but that was how I felt about the choices available. My vet was supportive of any decision. This was years before the osteo club, and not many people on here were discussing their dealings with osteo.

I did post on here that I lost him to osteo with no specifics. I have sent private messages to those speaking about it, and who seemed to be leaning towards a similar decision. More than one thanked me for helping them make the choice. I never felt guilty for my decision, but I didn't put myself out there for people who would want me to feel guilty, because I made a personal decision. In the above situation, I would probably have responded the same way. Let me get away from this person and deal with my sorrow on my own.

I read the osteo thread every week, and feel for everyone who has to deal with this disease! I cry over dogs I have never met. Please don't judge others for how they show love and compassion for their dogs.

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I am so glad I read this thread. Bonnie is our first dog, and just like everyone else, I dread the thought of her being diagnosed with osteo, but after reading Robin's response about dogs hiding their pain well, I now know how I would handle it. We all make decisions that we can live with, and hopefully those decisions also align with what's best for the animal.

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Guest IrskasMom

After reading all your Post's and your Opinions , I finally got over his ( Pup ) sudden Passing. My Heart is still broken . I have his Collar with My Irskas Collar and Ashes in my Family Room . Maybe I am to emotional . You all helped me .

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Guest iconsmum

I agree with Batmom.

 

You CAN cut your dog's leg off, irradiate him, fill him with chemicals, and HOPE you get another year or 18 months. Or you can accept that osteo is a painful, progressive disease and put an end to the dog's suffering.

 

People like to write about what a "fighter" their dog is. The dog has no choice. The dog isn't given the option to refuse the treatment. It's the owners who fight. I think, given a choice, most dogs would opt to go sooner rather than be subjected to all the treatment.

 

I'm not saying it's wrong if you choose aggressive treatment. But I wouldn't.

 

George had an ultrasound a year or so ago. I told the vet if she found cancer, to call me while he was still under because my intention was to put him to sleep without ever waking him. I personally think it's a kinder option. Dogs cannot possibly understand why all the things that need to be done in an aggressive course of action are being done. The fear, pain, and stress--is it worth it TO YOUR DOG? I doubt it.

 

Just my 2 cents.

 

 

 

 

it's a good 2 cents. I agree with you. The pain of the loss is something I can deal with separately by locking myself away to cry, but my only consideration has to be for the dog. I'm one of those who wouldn't amputate either. There always comes a day when my world hurts like hell and that's the unavoidable part of the whole dog thing.

Edited by iconsmum
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Guest iconsmum

Said Person is not on GreyTalk and I don't want NO Flames or harsh Words. On Sunday June 29 I last seen this Pup and he was limping slightly . He has been limping for quite some time but it was of and on . He was taking , because of my urging , to the Vet twice and then on Tuesday July 1 he was seen by an Orthopedic Specialist that confirmed my Suspicion ( the horrific Word "Osteo Sarcoma " ) My Question to her was "what did he ( the Specialist ) recommend for his Pain Regiment / Management " . She ignored my Question . By Wednesday Night , I saw his passing on Facebook .It was more then a Shock to see this . I am devastated .First of all , I loved him so very much and personally , I thought , he was not there yet. But I want to say , everybody is different in their Grief and prospect of Pain . Was it the right Time or right Thing to do by him . Please tell me , as I had always to this Day second Thoughts about my Irska. Now I have second Thoughts about this said Pup.

 

ANYONE who "knows" :) you from your presence here knows that you would only have been motivated by the love you had and clearly still have for that dog.

I think "Second" thoughts are just your brainwaves looking at the opposite side of the coin after the passing of time; that always happens, but it's not relevant....somewhere up there Irska is still loving you.

Edited by iconsmum
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