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My girlie is only 55 lbs (soaking wet) and my current foster is 75 lbs. When she runs after a toy, he will run after her and start bumping and mouthing at her head and neck (muzzled). She immediately freezes until he stops and then runs back to me to hide. I'm not sure how to correct him. She really hates physical play from another dog. I really think it's because she's so small.

 

Thoughts?

 

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Time outs. As soon as he makes any contact at all, without saying anything you remove him from the area and put him in a crate for 30 sec. If you need to, leave a leash with the handle loop cut off dragging so it's easier to grab him. Time out doesn't need to last more than 20-30 sec, then let him back out and tell him to "go play" if you want. Repeat ad nauseum.

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Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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I will definitely try that. Biggest issue is that my yard is about 1/2 acre so they get far away from me quickly. Maybe I will try a rope on his collar.

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Guest Lillypad

Feel NeylasMom has the best advice. Did the time out when a dog I was sitting would chase the cat. It did the trick. Just walked up to her didn't say a word and in the crate she goes. About the size of your yard could you make it smaller for training. Prehaps snow fencing. I discovered snow fencing and I love it. I have used it to section off a part of the yard for potty spot training. Got tired of pee holes all over the lawn, now she goes in one spot, thanks to the temporary fencing.


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They only interact this way when Tiera runs. If I reduce the size of the yard, she won't run. I am picking up some rope today, I figure I can make a 20' lead and that should do it. Thanks!

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An alternative, which is even easier, is never let them run at the same time. If your foster is going to be after her, it would just be easier to prevent any ability to perform the pushy behavior (which has got to be fun for him, and every time he does it he's self-rewarding even if you eventually catch him and stop it).

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I agree with Fruitycake. I would simply keep play times separate, especially if the hound is a temporary foster.

 

IMO, a long rope (or leash) hanging from the collar of a running Greyhound risks very serious injuries. Dogs trip themselves, tumble and crash badly when dragging leashes/lines. If coupled with a collar (especially a martingale), a Greyhound could choke or break his/her neck. Even if a human were able to get to the dog in time to attempt to release collar/neck pressure, the dog's neck and throat could be damaged.

 

(We even remove martingale collars for fenced group Greyhound play dates to prevent other dog's paws, nails, or teeth from getting caught in their playmate's martingale D-ring.)

 

If a short rope is required for some reason, maybe a 4 inch rope could be fastened to the (non-choking) side hardware of the collar (or harness) but it wouldn't help capture a 30-40 mph speeding Greyhound anyway. Probably much easier to separate zoomie play so each hound is comfortable. :)

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We plan to keep him, so separate play isn't an option. I NEVER have martingales on except for walks. Rope is tied non-slip and loose. The fact the Tiera immediately stops interacting with him is helping more than anything I have done. His face when she stops is priceless - "hey! Come back! Please?". Yesterday evening was great. I could see him holding back from bumping her and he mouthed without touching her. :yay

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest iconsmum

Time outs. As soon as he makes any contact at all, without saying anything you remove him from the area and put him in a crate for 30 sec. If you need to, leave a leash with the handle loop cut off dragging so it's easier to grab him. Time out doesn't need to last more than 20-30 sec, then let him back out and tell him to "go play" if you want. Repeat ad nauseum.

 

 

I like this answer: "without saying anything" rocks!

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Guest Jupiter

I think your dog is doing a good job training the foster on her own. By stopping play, she's saying to him loud and clear "If you do that I won't play with you" and he'll eventually get that message. I'm dealing with a similar situation with my 8yo Honey girl and our new huge 4yo foster Hank. I'm trying to let them sort some of this stuff out on their own, and Honey gives Hank the cold shoulder when she's had enough of his antics. I've also been trying to give Honey some playtime just on her own, in addition to them playing together. Sometimes, with certain things, dogs learn from other dogs better than from humans!

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An alternative, which is even easier, is never let them run at the same time. If your foster is going to be after her, it would just be easier to prevent any ability to perform the pushy behavior (which has got to be fun for him, and every time he does it he's self-rewarding even if you eventually catch him and stop it).

This :nod

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