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Lab Testing For TBD


Burpdog
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Thanks to MagickDolphin for the following:

 

ProtaTek Labs does a tick panel that includes erlichiosis, babesiosis, rocky mountain spott fever, lymne disease and valley fever for $53. This price is for greys ONLY.

 

Anyone who has done any tbd testing knows what a great price this is.

 

Your vet can send directly to:

 

ProtaTek Labs

574 East Alamo Street, Suite #90

Chandler, AZ 85225

Phone: 480-545-8499

Fax: 480-545-8409

 

www.protatek.com/ProtaTek_Reference_Lab/Greyhounds/body_greyhounds.html

 

I'm sure your vet will charge for shipping and drawing the blood, but even so it's an unbelievable price!

 

IMO every grey should have one done :)

Diane & The Senior Gang

Burpdog Biscuits

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That really is an unbelievable price, Diane, thanks for posting it.

Greyhound angels at the bridge- Casey, Charlie, Maggie, Molly, Renie, Lucy & Teddy. Beagle angels Peanut and Charlie. And to all the 4 legged Bridge souls who have touched my heart, thank you. When a greyhound looks into you eyes it seems they touch your very soul.

"A dog is the only thing on earth that loves you more then he loves himself". Josh Billings

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  • 3 weeks later...
Guest Iberia's Mom

Very good price! I am going to discuss this with our vet at the next visit. My dogs have no symptoms of any kind but I believe in erring on the side of caution! They have not been tested, to my knowledge, for these things.

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  • 3 weeks later...
Guest wmparker66

I realize that this testing is expensive. You would think that if it became a standard test before adopting out ex-racers, the cost could be driven down considerably. I spoke to the local facility here in Jacksonville about adding this test before adoption, and they said it would drive up the adoption price by $50.00. Currently, it costs $180 to adopt a racer here. This fee includes nutering/spaying, a vet visit, and 6 months of Heart Worm meds. I would definately be willing to pay the extra amount for piece of mind.

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Guest jananice

The problem with TBD is sometimes by the time the symptoms manifest themselves, the treatment is much more difficult. Our group has a once-a-year thing that we can sign up for and get low cost tick disease testing (all greys). THey've arranged it through one of the Banfield places. I know of two or three people whose dogs tested positive for both babesia and erlichia with no symptoms. Treated and eradicated in both cases as far as I know.

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Cobabana: I think it's a good thing to do. As I said in another thread, on the dogs of mine that haven't had one, it's the first test we do when they get sick. IMO it would be much better to plan the test. As jananice said, some do not show symptoms. On future dogs that come into my house, it will be done immediately :)

Diane & The Senior Gang

Burpdog Biscuits

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Guest trberry5

Having greys tested before adoption is a tricky thing. People who don't fully understand the diseases might pass on a positive dog.

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Guest mleg2001
With the prevalence of TBD in retired racers it seems like a good idea...

I seen one of the reports and the incidence rate was extremely high. I seen it just before or shortly after adopting Sunny. So when I took him in for his first checkup, my first request was to have a tick panel done.

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Guest judechet

I have used this lab in Arizona mainly because they have a national reputation for being very accurate in their results. The agency in Florida from which I adopted my last four greys recommended my vet send the test to them. Two were positive and treated with ease.

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Guest jjbryant81

I am a newbie and don't understand this health issue. Is it regional? We live in Illinois. Please explain what this disease is and how a dog gets it. Thanks!

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It is not regional because the dogs travel and I think all the states and Canada have ticks. There are tick borne diseases (hence the initials TBD), caused by a tick biting a dog (or human). This is not confined to greyhounds--any breed can come down with them (as well as humans). There is erlichiosis, babesios, rocky mountain spotted fever and lyme disease. I think there are more, but those are the prevelant ones. There are some threads in this section that have links to sites that explain TBDs. Let me know if you cannot find them and I'll help you :)

Diane & The Senior Gang

Burpdog Biscuits

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Guest mleg2001

Ticks and tick disease is a universal problem, lyme disease is a growing problem in Ontario, there has even been 1 report of babesia occurring here as well. Since ticks will even use birds as their host, these diseases can be spread long distances. Ticks, native to South America are being found on birds here when they are captured in the bird sanctuaries for indentification and banding.

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  • 3 weeks later...
Guest ccps27

The agency we adopted our grey from highly recommended this test and gave us a coupon to use at either of two vets in the area to have the test done for $55. Not thinking that my vet would be much more, since he is a grey vet affiliated with another adoption agency, I had him do the panel and it was $88 and $5 for the draw. Oh well, live and learn. It is worth it though to know she is okay and not a carrier.

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Guest Truitt

Thank you so much for all the helpful info.

I've had GHs for 4 yrs. now. We have a very Greyt Vet. & i'm setting here and wandering out of all the work done on our 4 babies... has this been done ?

I'll let you know in a little while.... gotta make a phone call.

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  • 4 weeks later...

This is a VERY important test, and should be done to all greys. I do agree that the added cost will turn away potential adopters, and a positive test can have the same effect. The group I got 4 of my hounds from, offered the test as an option for cost at a miracle deal price. The risk of TBD was explained, as well as the ambiguity or lack of symptoms in a positive dog. I had a dog that almost died from chronic ehrlichiosis, and had been incorrectly diagnosed and treated for epilepsy for a year and a half, by an otherwise very knowledgeable vet. IMO offering the test at a reduced price after adoption, with a thorough briefing on the risks of ignoring TBD is a good way to do it.

 

Teri and the greyherd

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  • 2 months later...

Thanks for the info...when I can finally adopt it will be the first thing that I have done :)

Kristin in Moline, IL USA with Ozzie (MRL Crusin Clem), Clarice (Clarice McBones), Latte and Sage the IGs, and the kitties: Violet and Rose
Lovingly Remembered: Sutra (Fliowa Sutra) 12/02/97-10/12/10, Pinky (Pick Me) 04/20/03-11/19/12, Fritz (Fritz Fire) 02/05/01 - 05/20/13, Ace (Fantastic Ace) 02/05/01 - 07/05/13, and Carrie (Takin the Crumbs) 05/08/99 - 09/04/13.

A cure for cancer can't come soon enough.--

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Guest greyrose
The problem with TBD is sometimes by the time the symptoms manifest themselves, the treatment is much more difficult.  Our group has a once-a-year thing that we can sign up for and get low cost tick disease testing (all greys).  THey've arranged it through one of the Banfield places.  I know of two or three people whose dogs tested positive for both babesia and erlichia with no symptoms.  Treated and eradicated in both cases as far as I know.

so many vets around the country are not familiar with TBDs. TBDs mimic so many other diseases that by the time symptoms occur, unknowledgeable vets are treating your dogs for everything under the sun, except the correct cause which equals a lot of unnecessary dollars thrown at the disease with no results. also, if steriods are used before finding out the symptoms are caused by TBD, the steriods may interfere with the correct treatment for tick disease.

 

I had one dog (who went to the rainbow bridge from other causes) that was positive to babesia. I didn't get a chance to treat her. two of my four greys have tick disease. one had babesia, was treated with Imizol then tested negative a year after treatment. one has babesia and erlichia, was treated with Imizol and is still positive to both diseases. her babesia titer was cut in half a year later but her erlichia titer went up. dr. suzanne stack said that her bone marrow might be dumping the erlichia cells into her blood stream in an effort to rid the body of the disease. she said she rarely worries about a dog after treatment with Imizol. our still positive dog was treated with a lengthy dose of Doxycycline and we plan to re-test her once again in the spring and see where her titer is. In the meantime, she has no symptoms but at least we know what we have should something start happening. our other two dogs tested negative.

 

I will caution folks not test a dog too soon off the track. our rose was tested within a few months of retirement and tested negative. a good friend suggested testing her again 9 months later which I did and she came out positive to babesia. the thought is that she was recently affected/bitten and her body didn't have time to build up noticeable antibodies before the first test. for this reason, not to mention the expense is why many groups are unable to test all of the dogs coming through their system. even if groups do test all of their dogs, if the dog was recently retired before testing, I would test them again a year later just to be on the safe side.

 

 

The problem with TBD is sometimes by the time the symptoms manifest themselves, the treatment is much more difficult. Our group has a once-a-year thing that we can sign up for and get low cost tick disease testing (all greys). THey've arranged it through one of the Banfield places. I know of two or three people whose dogs tested positive for both babesia and erlichia with no symptoms. Treated and eradicated in both cases as far as I know.
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  • 1 month later...

I test any greys that come into my care. In the future, if I were able to do adoption and placement on a larger scale, I would probably end up just putting each dog on a 2 week course of doxycycline just in case they were Lyme positive, since that is the most common TBD, at least in the greys I encounter here.

 

Lynn

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