Jump to content

New Owner Questions - Safe Play And Excitement


Guest Katherineaz
 Share

Recommended Posts

Guest Katherineaz

We have now had our first Grey for a few weeks and she is really coming out of her shell. To back track, she had been adopted before us and lived with a gal for a year who ran an assisted living home. She was returned to the group for a couple reasons, nothing that we have seen since having her.

 

My questions are playing and her excitement. I am tall and have an a boxer/lab years ago, but Prada’s play (or excitement) makes me nervous and I’m not quite sure how to handle it. In the mornings she is FULL of energy and bounces up and down running into me, same when I come home from work, or we get ready to go for a walk. On these instances I would like to keep her from bouncing. I try “Prada NO”, turn away from her but doesn’t work much. Are there some commands I should be teaching and working on with her?

 

Then “play” – she’s just so big (around 70 lbs.) and fast that I get a little nervous. Normally she loves throwing her stuff toys around, but I’m not sure how else to engage a safe play that won’t involve me getting run to the ground.

 

Just new to the Greyhound and really trying to understand her so I know how best to work with her. I love her SO much and she’s a sweetheart, just want to keep her and I safe. Thanks for any tips or ideas.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not exactly sure what your concern is. Are you worried about being knocked down if she bowls into you? Or are you afraid of her overly enthusiastic play that she's going to go over the top and nip you?

 

In my experience your best bet is to stand still when a greyhound comes running at you. Most of them have good brakes and great maneuverability. I've never had one of my own dogs run into me accidentally. With my puppy I engage in personal play at times (running around, stomping, jumping at each other, etc... playing without a toy basically) and she will in those cases jump up at me and if she gets really excited she will nip at my arms, sometimes a little too hard which I don't appreciate. In which case I just cut the play session short until she settles and then we try again. Or I might substitute a game of tug for the personal play so she can have something to put her mouth on.

 

Even my big 75lb male barreling at me at full speed doesn't worry me. He'll go around or stop in time. He always does. :)

Kristie and the Apex Agility Greyhounds: Kili (ATChC AgMCh Lakilanni Where Eagles Fly RN IP MSCDC MTRDC ExS Bronze ExJ Bronze ) and Kenna (Lakilanni Kiss The Sky RN MADC MJDC AGDC AGEx AGExJ). Waiting at the Bridge: Retired racer Summit (Bbf Dropout) May 5, 2005-Jan 30, 2019

Like us on Facebook!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Katherineaz

I'm not exactly sure what your concern is. Are you worried about being knocked down if she bowls into you? Or are you afraid of her overly enthusiastic play that she's going to go over the top and nip you?

 

In my experience your best bet is to stand still when a greyhound comes running at you. Most of them have good brakes and great maneuverability. I've never had one of my own dogs run into me accidentally. With my puppy I engage in personal play at times (running around, stomping, jumping at each other, etc... playing without a toy basically) and she will in those cases jump up at me and if she gets really excited she will nip at my arms, sometimes a little too hard which I don't appreciate. In which case I just cut the play session short until she settles and then we try again. Or I might substitute a game of tug for the personal play so she can have something to put her mouth on.

 

Even my big 75lb male barreling at me at full speed doesn't worry me. He'll go around or stop in time. He always does. :)

Sorry, I guess should I discourage the jumping or how do I get her to settle down when it's not play time?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest widowcali

When I get home from work, I have 2 Greys and an Irish Wolfhound who are very happy to see me. When I walk through the door, I have to push at them with my body to keep them from jumping on me. That seems to do the work. Also, I do not act with any excitement at seeing my babies after a long day. I've found that, if I remain calm and make sure I body block them from leaping on me, they calm down after a few minutes.

 

The Greys are getting older, so their play time involves torturing a stuffy for a few minutes or doing a few turns around the yard. But the IW is still young. Luckily, I have nephews and nieces that play with her. She has learned that nice play gets her pets and lovings and rough play gets her ignored for a few minutes and toys put away.

 

I would try something like what I explained. Remember, they are always happy to see you, no matter how long you were absent. You just have to make your comings and goings as non-excitement inducing as possible.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I assume you've tried simply ignoring her? If she's trying to get you to play by leaping around and jumping at you, either stand completely still and ignore her until she quiets down or walk away from her and busy yourself doing something else. Once she's calmer and not jumping around (she doesn't have to be completely still - just more "down" than "up" :lol) you can initiate play or pets.

 

To discourage jumping, you could try a quick, sharp "Eh Eh" (instead of "no"). For some dogs, it works if you take a step toward them when their front feet leave the ground. You don't want to push her or anything, just make it harder for her to stay up on her back legs so that she's more likely to keep all four on the floor. And as silly as it might sound, picture in your head exactly what you want her to be doing and try to "project" that onto her. Not in a psychic way, obviously, but just think "This is what I want to see...This is what I will see..." It won't magically fix the problem, but it'll help your mentality when you have a crazy lanky dog flying around :P

 

If she ever does get too excited and gives you a little nip, STOP whatever you're doing with her. Don't touch her, don't try to hide your arms, just put your arms by your sides and stop. If she keeps nipping, try "Eh Eh" or "No" in a "serious" tone (not angry, but an "I mean business" voice).

 

And don't use her name when you discipline - just the sound or word you choose to mean "Knock it off". Names should be reserved for happy times :)

Edited by Roo

Mom of bridge babies Regis and Dusty.

Wrote a book about shelter dogs!

I sell things on Etsy!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It sounds like she's happy and trying to get energy out. Unless its time to sleep, I don't want to discourage my dogs from playing. They play so little as it is. Have you tried keeping some toys by the door and throwing them away from you when she gets crazy? Even handing it to her might work as a good distraction.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Scouts_mom

If you are looking for ways to play with her some suggestions are:

 

Flying stuffies (person throws stuffies to the ceiling, dog pounces on them when they come down),

 

Chase (my house's rooms are arranged in a circle so I can "chase" the dog, until he turns the tables and "chases" me. this is done at a fast walk, not a grey. run)

 

Greyhound retrieving (person throws toy, dogs runs after it and may pick it up and return it to the person, or may move it to another part of the yard. Dog laughs at person going around yard collecting the toys.)

 

Lunge pole (a stuffy is tied with a couple of feet of string to a lunge whip, or other stick--I use a bamboo pole. Person holds pole like a fishing pole and makes the stuffy move, or swings it in a circle. Dog attacks stuffy.)

 

That's all I can think of at the moment.

 

Oh, my Angel Tia and I had stamping contests. She would playbow and slap the ground with her front legs. I would stamp back. And we would repeat and repeat and so on.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If she's jumping and happy when you get home, have some toys next to the door you can re-direct her energy to, then engage her yourself when she is calmer.

 

Out in the yard, it's much the same theory. Re-direct her to some activity that doesn't involve you directly. Throw a ball or stuffy, make her a sand pit to dig in, take her for long walks, etc.,.

 

You can teach her a command to help her settle. Many people use a "sit" or "down" command. I tell my guys "In the kitchen!" because our entrance is very small. They all learn to run into the kitchen and stand by the treat cabinet so they can get their "coming home" treat.

Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

35764734494_93de5b5963_b.jpg

Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Walter is usually pretty excited when I get home. At that point he's been home for 6-7 hours so my goal is to calm him down, and get him outside for a walk to pee. Sometimes he just doesn't care if we go out right away and he will run and get a toy and chew it while I change into comfy clothes. Sometimes I use my Teacher Voice and say NO really loud, throw his collars on and send him down the stairs to wait by the door(I live in an upstairs apartment). At that point, we go outside and he pulls a bit and he's excited.

 

When he first came home (a little over two years ago) I had never seen a greyhound play before and it was a little unnerving. He has only knocked me down once at a dog park, but never since then. I also taught him not to step on my feet! He used to nip a bit, but that stopped with Teacher Voice, "No"s. I think its as much of a learning curve for the grey as it is for their human. You will get gradually more comfortable and your grey will realize that certain things aren't cool. I still stay out of his way when he plays with his toys, I encourage him by grabbing the toy and saying "get it get it get it" in a high pitched voice. For me I am most concerned with my toes being stepped on or being scratched.

7218108076_e406044464_t.jpg 7004700518_27fa752995_t.jpg Walter (Windy Walker) and Ernie (PG Ernest) @WalterWallerson and IG: WalterandErnie 7150803233_d0700ccbdc_t.jpg 7004711314_ceba54665a_t.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Katherineaz

If she's jumping and happy when you get home, have some toys next to the door you can re-direct her energy to, then engage her yourself when she is calmer.

 

Out in the yard, it's much the same theory. Re-direct her to some activity that doesn't involve you directly. Throw a ball or stuffy, make her a sand pit to dig in, take her for long walks, etc.,.

 

You can teach her a command to help her settle. Many people use a "sit" or "down" command. I tell my guys "In the kitchen!" because our entrance is very small. They all learn to run into the kitchen and stand by the treat cabinet so they can get their "coming home" treat.

Thank you! I like the idea of having her maybe go to the kitchen and wait for me, and then reward her. It's hard to get in the house and put all of my stuff down, I can see this helping!!

When he first came home (a little over two years ago) I had never seen a greyhound play before and it was a little unnerving. He has only knocked me down once at a dog park, but never since then. I also taught him not to step on my feet! He used to nip a bit, but that stopped with Teacher Voice, "No"s. I think its as much of a learning curve for the grey as it is for their human. You will get gradually more comfortable and your grey will realize that certain things aren't cool. I still stay out of his way when he plays with his toys, I encourage him by grabbing the toy and saying "get it get it get it" in a high pitched voice. For me I am most concerned with my toes being stepped on or being scratched.

Thank you! I am just not use to so much energy coming at me so fast and strong! LOL! I am starting to build up my confidence each day as we are getting to know each other better.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...