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Did Adding A Second Greyhound Help The First's Separation Anxiety?


Guest LunaTheGreyt
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Did adding a second greyhound help the first's separation anxiety?  

11 members have voted

  1. 1. Did adding a second greyhound help the first's separation anxiety?

    • Yes - totally solved all SA problems for all dogs involved
      5
    • Somewhat - lessened first dog's SA, but didn't completely solve the problem
      1
    • No - first grey remained anxious as ever
      2
    • No - I have 2 greys with SA now
      0
    • Other (leave a comment)
      3


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I voted Other.

Gracie was our first greyhound and the presence of our calm mix breed dog did nothing to help Gracie relax. Neither did alone training. We endured weeks of hell and destruction before we put her on Clomicalm. The dose is gradually increased and finally got her understand/accept the alone training. Then we could begin gradually decreasing the dose. Beginning to end was maybe 5 months. Gracie's confidence grew and she became a therapy dog.

DAPP, music, melatonin, lavender, kongs. None of those had any affect.

 

Hada the podenco maneta, Georgie Girl (UMR Cordella), Lulu the podenco andaluz, Rita the podenco maneta
Angels: Charlie the iggy,  Mazy (CBR Crazy Girl), Potato, my mystery ibizan girl, Allen (M's Pretty Boy), Percy (Fast But True), Mikey (Doray's Patuti), Pudge le mutt, Tessa the iggy, Possum (Apostle), Gracie (Dusty Lady), Harold (Slatex Harold), "Cousin" Simon our step-iggy, Little Dude the iggy ,Bandit (Bb Blue Jay), Niña the galgo, Wally (Allen Hogg), Thane (Pog Mo Thoine), Oliver (JJ Special Agent), Comet, & Rosie our original mutt.

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Guest LunaTheGreyt

I voted Other.

Gracie was our first greyhound and the presence of our calm mix breed dog did nothing to help Gracie relax. Neither did alone training. We endured weeks of hell and destruction before we put her on Clomicalm. The dose is gradually increased and finally got her understand/accept the alone training. Then we could begin gradually decreasing the dose. Beginning to end was maybe 5 months. Gracie's confidence grew and she became a therapy dog.

DAPP, music, melatonin, lavender, kongs. None of those had any affect.

 

Yeah, I'm just wondering because Luna's been on the max dose of Clomicalm for her weight for about 2 weeks and I haven't seen much improvement. (She fooled me for a few days but we're back to making tons of noise now.) I've had her for a little under 3 months...will give it another month before I consider switching meds (or potentially adopting #2). None of those other things worked for her, either.

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She'll need to be on the Clomicalm for at least a month before you see a change. Just don't stop it cold turkey.

 

Hada the podenco maneta, Georgie Girl (UMR Cordella), Lulu the podenco andaluz, Rita the podenco maneta
Angels: Charlie the iggy,  Mazy (CBR Crazy Girl), Potato, my mystery ibizan girl, Allen (M's Pretty Boy), Percy (Fast But True), Mikey (Doray's Patuti), Pudge le mutt, Tessa the iggy, Possum (Apostle), Gracie (Dusty Lady), Harold (Slatex Harold), "Cousin" Simon our step-iggy, Little Dude the iggy ,Bandit (Bb Blue Jay), Niña the galgo, Wally (Allen Hogg), Thane (Pog Mo Thoine), Oliver (JJ Special Agent), Comet, & Rosie our original mutt.

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Guest LunaTheGreyt

She'll need to be on the Clomicalm for at least a month before you see a change. Just don't stop it cold turkey.

 

She's been on it for about a month and a half total (started out on 50 mg, now on 100 mg). Will give it some more time, and definitely wean off slowly if necessary. (I know from experience that going cold turkey with meds like that is a BAD idea!)

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Boy I feel like gloom and doom in all your posts... :lol

 

Our trainer's cardinal rule is that it's NEVER a good idea to add a second dog for the purpose of solving behavioral problems with the first. You run the risk of ending up with double the problems and double the responsibility. For dogs with SA, it's important to consider meds and alone training. But I would definitely keep working with her in other ways to make her a more confident, well adjusted dog. If you haven't taken a basic obedience class, do it! Take her places. Do new things together. Then if YOU want to add a dog in the future because you're at the right place in your life and the stars align, do it for that reason.

 

I do believe that SA is one of the most frustrating behavioral problems. It's tempting to consider adding another dog and then having the problem 100% go away, but I assure you, it doesn't often work that way.

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Guest LunaTheGreyt

Boy I feel like gloom and doom in all your posts... :lol

 

Our trainer's cardinal rule is that it's NEVER a good idea to add a second dog for the purpose of solving behavioral problems with the first. You run the risk of ending up with double the problems and double the responsibility. For dogs with SA, it's important to consider meds and alone training. But I would definitely keep working with her in other ways to make her a more confident, well adjusted dog. If you haven't taken a basic obedience class, do it! Take her places. Do new things together. Then if YOU want to add a dog in the future because you're at the right place in your life and the stars align, do it for that reason.

 

I do believe that SA is one of the most frustrating behavioral problems. It's tempting to consider adding another dog and then having the problem 100% go away, but I assure you, it doesn't often work that way.

 

Haha, don't worry about it! I just like hearing others' stories and experiences. I'm 95% certain I won't be adding a second dog anytime soon. She is super well-adjusted in all other aspects...has traveled to the beach for 2 weeks with me and my family, pet stores, ice cream stands, walked anyplace within a 3-mile radius of my apartment, to other people's houses, has met tons of strangers of all ages, dogs of all sizes, cats...and is fine with all of it. Perfect angel who sleeps 20+ hours/day (if I don't go anywhere). Her anxiety only manifests itself when she is alone...and you're right, it is extremely frustrating. :\

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Greyhound's transitional S.A. was helped tremendously by adding another Greyhound, and hound #1 became much more playful and content with a canine companion.

 

Just so happened that hound #2 arrived with separation anxiety (genetic). The calm hounds that followed helped hound #2 a little bit, but hound #2's focus is on humans' absences. The Greyhounds that followed do not have S.A.

 

I believe animals (especially canine pack animals) often thrive having a well-behaved compatible buddy, especially if their human works full-time. As a pet parent of multiples (for decades) retired racing Greyhounds are the easiest breed I've ever had in multiples. They are already used to living in mass. Even though Greyhounds are nearly perfect (through my adoring, rose colored glasses), every pet (cat, dog or whatever) is a unique responsibility whose behavior can change requiring extra time and care. Going from one dog to two dogs is fairly easy and not much more time consuming. Three or more is a good bit more daily work and time. Exercise requirements can change as they age. (We walk in shifts.)

 

If you are considering a second hound, first ask yourself if you really want a second Greyhound. You are the human responsible for both dogs care and well-being, and like children, both dogs should be considered your priority. My suggestion would be to inquire if fostering with intent to adopt is an option (to watch behavior compatibility in your home/lifestyle situation). Another idea if you aren't ready to make a full commitment is to simply continue fostering hounds while your hound is adjusting to retirement. That would help another hound or two find a forever home. Many adoption groups pay for their foster dogs' food, supplies and medical expenses, so you would be providing your hound with a friend without long-term financial obligations.

 

 

 

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Our trainer's cardinal rule is that it's NEVER a good idea to add a second dog for the purpose of solving behavioral problems with the first.

 

 

 

Then if YOU want to add a dog in the future because you're at the right place in your life and the stars align, do it for that reason.

 

 

I would say it very much depends on the behavioural problem and I don't really consider SA to be a behavioural problem. It's an emotional/instinctive response to being suddenly thrust into a situation that terrifies them. Their normal social support structure and 'safety net' is gone and without it they lose confidence and they feel very vulnerable.

 

I think of it like this: How would you feel if a foreign person with very poor English skills kidnapped you and took you to a place with no way to communicate except through this person who could understand you only a little? This person takes care of your basic needs, but you can't explain how you feel, what you want, what you need, etc, and you can't escape. Then they go out, locking the door behind them, and don't tell you where they're going or when they'll be back. I think many of us would panic immediately. Maybe we'd shout, hoping to attract attention, maybe we'd start trying to find a way out, whether it meant breaking doors or windows or whatever.

 

For some dogs with SA, all they need is the support of a companion, and they can cope. Then they have a mini 'pack' in their companion and this gives them a little more confidence. Some dogs need more help than that.

 

I do accept that the dogs I've had have had fairly mild SA compared to some (even though, at its worst, Jim's frantic shrieks and the wrecked, poop-plastered bathroom we came home to didn't seem very mild at the time), and I do accept that some dogs, like some people, need medication to get through the psychological 'ordeal' of being adopted.

 

Most definitely I would try 'alone training' first. And, yes, I too would only recommend getting a second dog if you really WANT another dog. I think those two things go without saying. :)

 

 

3GreytJoys: I'm not sure what you meant by 'genetic' SA. In a sense, SA is genetically programmed into every dog on the planet. Could you explain further?

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The plural of anecdote is not data

Brambleberry Greyhounds My Etsy Shop

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When we adopted out second pup, it was for us more than our first, Charlie. In the end though, Charlie loved having Jack around as they would run together after squirrels in the backyard. Jack was less excited about Charlie as he was a 'bull in a china shop' Grey whereas he was more delicate so the running quickly stopped when Charlie would bump him. Doesn't really answer your question but I do know a lot of SA pups enjoy having a second around and it really reduces their anxiety.

Kyle with Stewie ('Super C Ledoux, Super C Sampson x Sing It Blondie) and forever missing my three angels, Jack ('Roy Jack', Greys Flambeau x Miss Cobblepot) and Charlie ('CTR Midas Touch', Leo's Midas x Hallo Argentina) and Shelby ('Shari's Hooty', Flying Viper x Shari Carusi) running free across the bridge.

Gus an coinnich sinn a'rithist my boys and little girl.

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I voted Other.

Gracie was our first greyhound and the presence of our calm mix breed dog did nothing to help Gracie relax. Neither did alone training. We endured weeks of hell and destruction before we put her on Clomicalm. The dose is gradually increased and finally got her understand/accept the alone training. Then we could begin gradually decreasing the dose. Beginning to end was maybe 5 months. Gracie's confidence grew and she became a therapy dog.

DAPP, music, melatonin, lavender, kongs. None of those had any affect.

Deja vu! When Doodles came to live with us Carl actually got worse for a while, lots of civilization. Now I have two howlers.

Sunsands Doodles: Doodles aka Claire, Bella Run Softly: Softy aka Bowie (the Diamond Dog)

Missing my beautiful boy Sunsands Carl 2.25.2003 - 4.1.2014

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