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Sa Issues And A Houdini Complex


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Guest jimmy_dee

Hi everyone! Brand new to this site and first time greyhound owner. I adopted my boy Otto around two months ago. He's less than two years old so relatively young to be retired (he only raced six times and apparently the concept of running in a straight line was too much for him haha). He's already the best dog I've ever had, totally calm when people are around, affectionate and perfectly happy both at play and lounging around the apartment. But ever since the very first day I've had him he's had severe separation anxiety issues. I've tried every remedy and alone training method I could find online and nothing works for him. He howls after only a few minutes of being alone. He was injuring himself in the first crate I had him in so i shelled out a little extra dough for a bigger, nicer crate. At first he would just rip up the bedding and never stop howling and crying. Eventually he completely destroyed the crate. Every zip tie and bungee cord I used couldn't keep him in. When he gets out of the crate he proceeds to destroy my blinds and scratch the heck out of my front door. He has even managed to escape the apartment a couple times. So I graduated to gating him in the kitchen. before too long he started chewing on the gate enough to pull it away from the wall and escape yet again. We've been to the vet and he's started on Reconcile. He's been on it for about a week and as of yet has had little effect. After escaping the apartment yet again yesterday I resorted to muzzling him to stop him chewing on the gate to escape (after I post this I will be going home for lunch to see how it worked). Even when he's alone with other dogs he still goes crazy.

 

What should I do? should i shell out the big bucks for an aluminum crate? should I consult a behaviorist? I'm at a loss as to what to do now and I need some help from experienced greyhound owners!

 

Thanks everyone!

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Guest kkaiser104

Other people will have better suggestions re:medication, but Teddi had pretty awful SA when he came home and the worst thing to do was crate him. I wouldn't shell out the bucks for another crate--I don't think that's the best plan. I would continue with alone training and trying to find something to get his mind off of your leaving. Have you tried frozen kongs, puzzle toys, etc.?

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Guest jimmy_dee

I have. I've used frozen kongs filled with peanut butter and he either ignores them or they only keep his attention for a little bit. Several times I've come home and they're right where I left them and he'll pick them up and start playing with them once I'm home. Yet other times it seems he freaks out then focuses his attention on the kong, and then proceeds to freak out again.

I'm just ultimately concerned for his safety. I'll replace the blinds as many times as it takes but my number one concern is for when he escapes the apartment

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My advice: a second Greyhound. It solved all my Grey's SA problems years ago. We have not had just one Grey for many years. We have no SA problems either.

 

I don't know if you're able to do that, but it would be the best fix, IMO.

 

ETA, remember that Greyhounds have never in their lives been without other Greyhounds around.

Edited by mom2four

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Guest kkaiser104

How exactly is he escaping the apartment?

 

If you've tried all of the typical things, your options are 1) drugs 2) time 3) a second grey. When Teddi's problems were the worst (a month after adoption), my roommate adopted a puppy and all was well. The SA came back when we moved to a new apartment (I now live alone) and after realizing how happy Teddi is with other dogs, I preadopted his littermate and he'll be home in the next few weeks.

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Guest jimmy_dee

I've considered it but these are my concerns: when left alone with my friends dogs he was still howling and freaking out. Additionally about a week ago I had to travel for my cousin's wedding. The place I adopted him from offers free boarding for any greyhound adopted from there when I need. So I told them about his issues and they said they would see how he acted with the other greyhounds. When I picked him up they said he was still showing extreme agitation at being devoid of human contact. Even when left alone with other greyhounds

He's escaping by jumping up on the door I guess and unlocking the door and then forcing it open. I don't know exactly how he does it as I've never seen it in person. Plus he doesn't do it everyday, just some days.

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Guest kkaiser104

I've considered it but these are my concerns: when left alone with my friends dogs he was still howling and freaking out. Additionally about a week ago I had to travel for my cousin's wedding. The place I adopted him from offers free boarding for any greyhound adopted from there when I need. So I told them about his issues and they said they would see how he acted with the other greyhounds. When I picked him up they said he was still showing extreme agitation at being devoid of human contact. Even when left alone with other greyhounds

He's escaping by jumping up on the door I guess and unlocking the door and then forcing it open. I don't know exactly how he does it as I've never seen it in person. Plus he doesn't do it everyday, just some days.

 

Can you use an ex pen or gate just to block the door? Or another lock? I have to deadbolt my door or Teddi opens it and waits for me. He doesn't go anywhere...just watches.

 

I think part of the new dog philosophy is they have to be able to bond with another dog. Teddi's SA wasn't instantly cured--but when Sammy had been home a new weeks it went away because he was very close with Sammy. The same thing is true with my parents greys--he was still very anxious until he really knew them and fit in with the pack and then he was much happier.

Could you foster for your group? That would give you a better idea.

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Guest jimmy_dee

 

Can you use an ex pen or gate just to block the door? Or another lock? I have to deadbolt my door or Teddi opens it and waits for me. He doesn't go anywhere...just watches.

 

I think part of the new dog philosophy is they have to be able to bond with another dog. Teddi's SA wasn't instantly cured--but when Sammy had been home a new weeks it went away because he was very close with Sammy. The same thing is true with my parents greys--he was still very anxious until he really knew them and fit in with the pack and then he was much happier.

Could you foster for your group? That would give you a better idea.

I actually called maintenance for my building and they're gonna come look at the door. I'm gonna try getting another lock on it too. Fostering is something I haven't considered though. I'll look into it

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The basic concept of alone training is that the dog is never left alone long enough to become agitated. That's the concept. It works very poorly in real life because how many of us have weeks to months of never leaving the house for more than an hour or two? It sucks. That said....

 

Do you have the financial ability to take him to doggy day care? Or a friend/family member/home daycare setting where he could be baby sat and have a human with him all day? If yes to either of those here is what I would do.

 

When you work or have to leave the house at all you send him to his day care. When you are home you work on alone training. You can crate him, gate him, leave him loose, it doesn't matter. I'll use the crate to explain but it all basically works the same on different scales. You crate your dog and give him his Kong. You step back for two seconds and go back and let him out. You take away his Kong as soon as you let him out. Put him back in, give him his Kong, wait 5 seconds and let him out. Put him back in, Kong, wait 15 seconds. You alternate how long he is in the crate so that it is random, but working up to increasingly longer times (2 seconds, 5 seconds, 10 seconds, 4 seconds, 15 seconds, 30 seconds, 10 seconds, etc.). If the dog becomes anxious at all you're going too fast... back off to less time. Eventually you start stepping out of sight for a split second and coming right back. Then you're working the time up on being out of sight. Eventually you're leaving the room. Then you're leaving the house and standing outside the front door. Then you're just going around the block. Then you're going to the movie rental store and back. If the dog gets anxious at any point you're going too fast!

 

You can see why this isn't feasible in real life and why you need the pet sitter. Medication can help but you still need to do all the steps in the training. Playing around with how you confine can help a bit as well. Maybe he's a LITTLE better gated instead of crated.

 

Remember to practice at all sorts of times of day. In the morning is not always when you leave. And you might not always leave in the morning. Get up early on Saturday and go through your whole routine as if you're going to work. Take a random day off work and sleep in as if it is a weekend. The goal is to make your routine and your absence boooooring!

 

Ultimately some dogs do end up needing a home where someone is home most of the time. But I'd say most dogs can learn to be okay with being alone, some just take more work than others.

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So sorry you are going through this. You will get the best advice here.

 

PLEASE be aware that some dogs should never, ever be crated. Some will destroy all their teeth trying to chew their way out of a metal crate. And when their teeth are gone they will wear their paws down to a raw bloody mess trying to dig their way out. A muzzle may save some teeth but not the feet. Be careful.

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Guest jimmy_dee

The basic concept of alone training is that the dog is never left alone long enough to become agitated. That's the concept. It works very poorly in real life because how many of us have weeks to months of never leaving the house for more than an hour or two? It sucks. That said....

 

Do you have the financial ability to take him to doggy day care? Or a friend/family member/home daycare setting where he could be baby sat and have a human with him all day? If yes to either of those here is what I would do.

 

When you work or have to leave the house at all you send him to his day care. When you are home you work on alone training. You can crate him, gate him, leave him loose, it doesn't matter. I'll use the crate to explain but it all basically works the same on different scales. You crate your dog and give him his Kong. You step back for two seconds and go back and let him out. You take away his Kong as soon as you let him out. Put him back in, give him his Kong, wait 5 seconds and let him out. Put him back in, Kong, wait 15 seconds. You alternate how long he is in the crate so that it is random, but working up to increasingly longer times (2 seconds, 5 seconds, 10 seconds, 4 seconds, 15 seconds, 30 seconds, 10 seconds, etc.). If the dog becomes anxious at all you're going too fast... back off to less time. Eventually you start stepping out of sight for a split second and coming right back. Then you're working the time up on being out of sight. Eventually you're leaving the room. Then you're leaving the house and standing outside the front door. Then you're just going around the block. Then you're going to the movie rental store and back. If the dog gets anxious at any point you're going too fast!

 

You can see why this isn't feasible in real life and why you need the pet sitter. Medication can help but you still need to do all the steps in the training. Playing around with how you confine can help a bit as well. Maybe he's a LITTLE better gated instead of crated.

 

Remember to practice at all sorts of times of day. In the morning is not always when you leave. And you might not always leave in the morning. Get up early on Saturday and go through your whole routine as if you're going to work. Take a random day off work and sleep in as if it is a weekend. The goal is to make your routine and your absence boooooring!

 

Ultimately some dogs do end up needing a home where someone is home most of the time. But I'd say most dogs can learn to be okay with being alone, some just take more work than others.

I will continue to try and alone train with him but I really don't have the means to leave him at doggie day care or anything while I'm at work. I've tried your method but not on that small of a scale so I will modify it

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IMHO, adding another dog is not the solution... you could end up with TWO dogs with problems and TWO big financial commitments instead of just one. And it sounds like Otto really needs your undivided attention right now. As the others have said, I'd continue with a strict alone training program in combination with the meds. If that doesn't work, it may be worth considering that not every dog is right for every home (and vice versa). :(

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Guest kkaiser104

I will continue to try and alone train with him but I really don't have the means to leave him at doggie day care or anything while I'm at work. I've tried your method but not on that small of a scale so I will modify it

 

The method Krissy describes is what I used with Teddi. It took weeks and weeks to get him to the 10 minute mark, and that's when my roommate got her dog, so we didn't have to go past that. But being patient is the key. Another thing that you want to do is to carefully watch when he becomes anxious. Teddi used to get anxious when I got in the shower in the morning, because he knew that meant I was leaving soon. You can try mixing up the routine, doing it randomly throughout the day and then not leaving, etc.. I used to get up early on days when I didn't have to go to school, shower, get ready, and then just sit around all day with Teddi. That teaches them that you aren't always going to leave them when you do that routine.

 

Have you tried other high-reward treats? Teddi always gets a bully slice (like a bully stick but much smaller) when I leave.

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Guest jimmy_dee

Well I'm definitely committed to keeping him. He's literally 100% perfect in every other regard. He's exactly the dog I wanted to get when I adopted. I just feel bad having him get so anxious when he's alone (and for my neighbors). But today I gated him in the kitchen, muzzled him, and put two dining room chairs behind the gate so he won't try and jump over. That kept him in the kitchen so the immediate crisis of him escaping is averted for now. Plus he is really kinda young still (not even two) so I'm confident he'll eventually learn to cope. Even when he gets out of the kitchen he doesn't deficate in the house out of nervousness anymore so he is making progress.

 

On a side note has anyone else ever adopted one that is as young as him? He's only a year and half and only raced 6 times. Most of the other dogs that I looked at were at least 3. The next youngest I think was two.

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The Reconcile won't have an immediate effect. It will need time to build up in his system. I hope today was a turning point for him. Once we started Clomicalm for my Gracie it took over a month to see results. By the 4-5 month we were able to wean her off of it. She was 2 at the time and flunked racing before even getting to a track.

 

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Congratulations on your adoption of Otto! :) Although your boy is young, we get a lot of early retirees (Otto's age) in Greyhound adoption programs. In general, we consider that Greyhounds mature into adults by about age 3, but each hound is different.

 

I agree that a second dog is not helpful in certain S.A. cases. Certain dogs are most fearful of their human leaving. Much good advice already provided re: alone training, and temporary medication as a helpful aid to open the dog's mind allowing more successful alone training. Tiny increments leading up to the first 30 minutes of success is usually most important and takes the most alone training time.

 

Glad you're working to prevent Otto from getting loose from the confines of your apartment. That is very serious and could be life-threatening. Many Greyhounds escape out a door or window and are killed by cars, or are never found. (See GreyTalk's Amber Alert section.) Please try to install a second lock up high on your door leading out of your apartment (closer to top of door). Also, ensure you don't leave windows wide open. If windows must be open for air circulation, please use strong metal window locks allowing only 3"- 4" of open window that your hound can't push open to escape. Their determined needle noses are stronger than we think. Greyhounds being sighthounds are also more likely to see wildlife moving outside and try to escape out windows. Couple that with separation anxiety and it's a far greater risk. They have no sense of heights either.

 

Leaving a new, anxious dog alone for 8 hours is really way too long. The more anxiety builds, panic takes over. Leaving your blinds raised a couple of feet so he can see outside may help save the blinds. Keep in mind that some highly anxious dogs are simply not able to hold their urine and bowels. (Like people needing to urinate more frequently when nervous.) Better elimination timing for Greyhounds is every 4 hours (to maximum 6 hours) during the day. Some highly anxious dogs can't even last 4 hours. (Btw, good that Otto's potty accidents have stopped now. Hopefully, that good luck will continue with temporary calming medication. If not, please remember to avoid any punishment for a hound having accidents inside (potty accidents or house damage). Any action stemmed from fear should never be punished. Punishment compounds dogs' fear/anxiety for a looong time.

 

Stay in touch with your vet. It does take time for long-term medications to build in the dog's system. Sometimes dosages need to be increased gradually, per vet's recommendation. Vet may be able to couple his medication with a shorter-acting med too.

 

Understandably, many people can't afford to hire a dog sitter/walker. Some dog owners arrange to come home at lunch daily. If that's not possible, and no Greyhound savvy friends/neighbors/family are available, please ask your adoption group for help. Another Greyhound group member might be retired at home and be willing to welcome your hound into their home during your work week for a while. Some people trade pet-sitting time. Perhaps you could offer to watch their hound during their vacation.

 

I'd agree with muzzling + a tall baby-gate for Otto instead of a crate. When dog is not muzzled, stuffed Kongs are wonderful as one of the safer options when a dog is left unsupervised. During training and beyond, be sure to pick up the Kong every time you enter the room. That "special" treat should be reserved for use only during your absences. Kong should be thoroughly washed out + dried daily. I'm not a fan of leaving any choking hazards like toys, rawhide, bully sticks, or tennis balls for dogs who are left unsupervised. If a Greyhound is not muzzled, besides Kongs, large, hard Nylabone "Durachews" can be very helpful as a stress reliever. (Bacon, liver or other flavors are good, but "original flavor" is not flavored.) Peanut butter can be spread on Durachews to increase interest also. (I do not recommend any softer Nylabone products. They can break apart and be ingested too easily with strong Greyhound chewers.)

 

"Through a Dog's Ear" calming music works well, especially for muzzled hounds who can't lick or chew any dog safe item. The CDs are great if you have a multi-CD player, but their player device plays/repeats for multiple hours. It really does help relax dogs (and people), but needs to be played frequently at first when you are home relaxing with your hound too: www.icalmdog.com

 

Yes, a positive method certified animal behaviorist could be very helpful. Ask your adoption group for a Grey savvy recommendation. Anything you can do to avoid his direct access to the door from which he sees you leave should help.

 

A nanny/animal video cam is often helpful to watch hounds' actions/timing in their individual situation.

 

Just curious what kind of crates you were using previously? Good luck, and enjoy your time with Otto! :)

Edited by 3greytjoys
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Guest jimmy_dee

3greytjoys,

 

Thanks for the awesome advice! I have been coming home most days at lunch to let him out and that seems tp help him (although I can't make it everyday). One of the things I've noticed is he seems to be content after escaping one level of confinement. When he was breaking out of the crate daily he would still cry and howl, but he would never try to break out of the baby gate. But since he finally did in the crate for good he starts off gated in the kitchen and will try to escape! He's very complicated haha. The crate I had was a Four Paws wide crate. Plenty tall and plenty wide and he would love to lay in it if I was in the room but the second I'd leave he'd whine.

Edited by jimmy_dee
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Great that you're able to come home frequently at lunch. That could reduce the number of work days needed for a pet-sitter. Another benefit of having someone else watch him during some of your work days is he's less likely to hyper-attach to only one person. One of the first things I recommend for couples working with a dog experiencing S.A. is to share their dog's care duties (feeding, walking, etc.). (Children should not be permitted to walk Greyhounds due to strength differences.) It's actually harder for a single owner to deal with a dog with intense separation anxiety because the dog relies on that sole person for everything. The dog is terrified to see you leave for what feels like an eternity... Aside from instinctual pack concerns, he knows that one specific human is responsible for his every basic need in life, especially his access to eliminate where he's "supposed" to go. These transitions can be tough for a pack animal who was suddenly removed from a lifetime surrounded by and taking cues from other Greyhounds, plus kennel helpers nearby much of the time or at least every four hours for daily caretaking duties.

 

I understand Otto begins whining immediately to let you know his displeasure about being left alone, and that is normal for many new dogs. (Like a crying baby at nap time.) After a while, many dogs will learn their new routine and begin to quiet down. Many dogs also whine, howl, or bark as desperate communication when they desperately need to eliminate. (Video cam helps determine timing issues.) Letting your neighbors who stay home during your work week know you are working hard to resolve the noise may help too.

 

Just to clarify my mention of a second lock near top of door. That's assuming the original lock by the door handle is fixed to be secure enough to not allow Otto to push open the lower part of the door.

 

If you're not already doing so, try leaving a radio turned on to a "talk" only station.

 

I understand re: contentment after escaping a level of confinement, especially a crate or ex-pen. Sometimes, a cage phobic dog is so delighted to be left out of a crate, ex-pen, etc. sometimes they try a little harder to handle human departures (even though they still feel extremely anxious). An option ONLY IF you can secure the structure of the apartment door and windows, and gate or block off the door from paw damage, you might try a SHORT duration test leaving him with his muzzle on while you exit the apartment (out of his sight) for a little while. Nice if you can quietly watch him through a window (away from the door so he doesn't see you). If you're concerned about him lifting his leg in the apartment (when not in the kitchen enclosure), he could wear a Greyhound belly band with pad inside for short durations.

 

This smart boy needs mindful stimulation. Instead of spending more money on a stronger crate, I highly recommend both of you enrolling in positive method, reward based obedience training. It will help communication between you and Otto at home, and work his extremely intelligent brain. Ask your adoption group for a Greyhound savvy, positive, reward method trainer. Greyhounds are a highly sensitive breed, and do best with a trainer who understands working with their natural behavior. I'd bet your boy is SUPER eager to please, and would benefit greatly from building his self confidence through obedience training.

 

What is Otto's morning routine and timing?

Edited by 3greytjoys
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Guest jimmy_dee

He generally gets up when I do. So weekdays he'll be up around 7 like me and on the weekends he's fine not going out til past 9 sometimes. I usually take him on his is last walk of the day right before I go to bed. So around 1030 on weekdays and even later on the weekends. So after we walk first thing in the morning I'll feed him and then he'll go lie back down while I'm getting ready. The cue that gets him all riled up is when he hears me pick up my keys. To him it either means I'm leaving or we're going for a walk.

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Good that you noticed Otto is relaxed prior to hearing your keys. An important part of alone training is watching his reactions to subtle departure cues. He may begin panting, looking worried, or gluing himself to your side more closely. Since he's being leash walked (vs. being let out in a fenced back yard), it's normal for him to be on extra high alert hearing your keys. He certainly doesn't want to sleep through or miss an outing with you! :) Whenever you are home, pick up and jingle your keys then put them down, then continue puttering around/relaxing inside the apartment (so Otto will settle/relax). Do that frequently every day/evening. Your solo departure cues should be done so often and/or at different times of day/night that they become completely boring to Otto. When it's time for a real outing with Otto, provide a different clear signal just for him: Call Otto's name (okay to add a brief whistle sound) so he's clear when it's his turn to go along. Eventually, he will learn the difference.

 

Not sure of your typical walk duration, etc. so I'll elaborate an example. Many dogs need a minimum of two morning outings before a human's departure. Not every outing needs to be a long exercise walk. Just one long walk, plus 1 or 2 separate "business outings" are fine before departure.

 

Assuming Otto has no paw pad soreness or injuries, and he's already built up walking endurance by now, I'd suggest his first morning walk be at a rapid pace for good exercise for approximately 30 minutes (gradually build up to 40-45 minutes). Let him fully eliminate first thing, and be careful to stop several times for eliminations with a bit of enjoyable sniffing along the way. Once home, try to let him rest until he's no longer panting before feeding breakfast to reduce risk of bloat*. Later, about 10-15 minutes before your final departure, provide him a full elimination outing for business purposes, but please don't rush this important elimination outing. Great if Otto learns a special place for his final outing is all about business. (Some dogs hold back a reserve for marking when they think they're going on a fun, meandering, sniffing pee-mail, doggie walk. A fun doggie walk is usually better at night.)

 

*Ideally, to reduce risk of "bloat" in dogs, it's best to avoid excessive exercise 1 hour before a meal, or 2 hours after a meal (most important if dogs are running hard). Many people don't take that much extra time in the mornings, thus my suggestion for longer walk first thing in the morning before breakfast.

 

Good luck with Otto's progress, and please feel free to ask questions along the way. Many people here have been where you are with Otto.

 

(Btw, once you post 50 times, you can PM (private message) on GT. A few sections don't count, like Cute and Funny, Off Topic, and maybe Soap Box -- if I recall correctly.)

Edited by 3greytjoys
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Guest Trammell

Well I'm definitely committed to keeping him. He's literally 100% perfect in every other regard. He's exactly the dog I wanted to get when I adopted. I just feel bad having him get so anxious when he's alone (and for my neighbors). But today I gated him in the kitchen, muzzled him, and put two dining room chairs behind the gate so he won't try and jump over. That kept him in the kitchen so the immediate crisis of him escaping is averted for now. Plus he is really kinda young still (not even two) so I'm confident he'll eventually learn to cope. Even when he gets out of the kitchen he doesn't deficate in the house out of nervousness anymore so he is making progress.

 

On a side note has anyone else ever adopted one that is as young as him? He's only a year and half and only raced 6 times. Most of the other dogs that I looked at were at least 3. The next youngest I think was two.

I adopted Loni when she was 18 months - she too has terrible crate anxiety. I have thought that maybe it had to do with her coming straight from the farm, leaving her momma and not being crated (who really knows though?). I tried the crate, and then I thought she would hurt her teeth (video taped). So I stopped crating her, but tried using baby gates (she body slammed them), so then I stopped confining her. Her SA didn't immediately go away, but eventually it did (although she must be in the same room as us if we are home, she is not happy if she can't be in the same room). However, I have two small dogs that she could see when she wasn't crated. One of them is a houdini, so I muzzled Loni in case my little Houdini broke out :P She still has to be in the same room as us when we are home, but she is fine now when left home. I moved just a couple of months ago, and now prop up some gates to keep her out of the room that my foster is being crate in. I wanted her to be able to knock them over vs body slam them and injure herself. She hasn't knocked over the gates, but she can see the front door, the little dogs, and can go out the doggie door to go potty. Mine HATES being walked, lol, unless she is jealous someone else is going on the walk. Mental stimulation can tire a dog just like physical exercise, maybe try doing a quick training session in the mornings, or playing with toys if your pup likes that. It could help to wear him out and make him sleep more during the day. Maybe after some time of not being confined to a small area and realizing that you are coming home he will settle down? I second the foster idea, you could see if having a dog there on a regular basis would help, and you wouldn't be making a life long commitment to a second dog. But take other people's more experienced (and wonderfully detailed) advise rather than my trial and error :P

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If the sound of your keys is a trigger, why not pick them up several times a day and just put them back down a few minutes or so later so he no longer associates that noise with your leaving?

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Guest LunaTheGreyt

My Luna is 2.5 and developed moderate S.A. after a week with me. I've tried literally everything to ease it in the 2.5 months I've had her, but I'm now convinced that time, consistency, and the help of 50 mg clomipramine twice daily will be the only things that really help. I installed baby gates in my kitchen which only heightened her anxiety, so I allow her to roam my condo (bathroom and bedroom closed off) -- she has to wear her muzzle though, because she has destroyed blinds in the past.

 

I highly recommend care.com when it comes to finding affordable pet care. Through that site I found a girl who works from home and loves having Luna come over when I'm going to be gone for extended periods, and she only charges me $50/week for basically 40 hours of care. I'm hoping that when I return to work in a few weeks (I'm a teacher) Luna will be calm enough to sleep the day away at MY house, but it's nice to have the option.

 

S.A. is a tough nut to crack and I wish you the best of luck with your boy!

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