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7 Staples In My Head


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Guest Groundhog

New to Greytalk, and I'm upset on so many levels, so let me give you a background. My DH and I adopted our first Greyhound, Faye, 2 months ago. She's almost 3 years old. In the first couple of weeks we had her, she snapped at a houseguest who tried to pet her while she was in her bed, and at a toddler who did the same thing. Yes-now I understand what went wrong, and we didn't let that happen again. She bonded very quickly and has been a peach, no aggression at all. I could pet her and rub her belly and stick my hand in her mouth with no reaction. Yesterday it all went south, and it wasn't her fault, but I don't think we can keep her. I was sitting on our reclining sofa, reclined, yesterday morning. I didn't realize that she was asleep while partially under the footrest, and you can figure out what happened. We both jumped up and she bit my head and nose, without breaking the skin. I can't blame her for this at all, I would have done the same thing had I been a dog. We were both quite upset, and she wouldn't come near me most of the day. I felt TERRIBLE that the trust we had built up had been damaged, although she did allow me to walk her and feed her. After awhile she let me check her over and she didn't appear to be injured in any way,no broken skin, no tenderness anywhere else. At bedtime I was sitting on the floor next to her, talking gently and lightly petting her when without warning, she attacked and bit my head open. No warning growl, no body language that indicated that she was stressed or fearful. A trip to the ER ensued with 7 staples to close the gash. I feel terrible that a promising adoption of a lovely dog was derailed by an unfortunate circumstance, but I don't feel that I can safely keep her. We live in a neighborhood full of dogs and children and I'm afraid the inhibition of her bite reflex has been reduced to zero. I'm waiting for a return call from our adoption agency and thought I'd throw this out for some insight. My heart is broken.

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It sounds like she just doesn't enjoy being touched while she's laying down. As long as she's standing, she's probably safe around everyone. As for no warnings, she probably gave a few subtle ones that you didn't notice. Licking lips, tensing, freezing up, tail wagging in a certain way can all be signals that she's uncomfortable. Honestly, she's given you many warnings now, including that same morning. I'd say her inhibition isn't bad. Have you corrected her for growling? If so, that could be why she bit this time.

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Guest PiagetsMom

You will get far better insight or direction than I can give you, but I'm so, so sorry that this happened :grouphug I'm glad that you've called your adoption agency, and I hope they'll be able to advise you.

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Guest Doggone

There may be many people who will flame me for this, but how comfortable will YOU be around her in the future? To me, that should play a large part in your decision.

I'm new to greyhounds so they may be different, but in my experience with previous dogs, if the owner has trepidation around them, they sense it and any training re: aggression may be futile. In a dog with aggression issues (even mild ones), I have found that if a dog senses fear, they become more dominant, not less.

Good luck whatever you decide :).

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I'm so sorry that this happened to both of you. I hope the bites heal and that there will not be any physical scars although, I suspect that there will always be emotional ones.

 

As to why it happened, hard to tell .. maybe Faye was hurt, maybe skittish from the earlier incident, maybe it's still too early for her to trust anyone ...

 

One of my greys just doesn't like anyone within a certain "perimeter" of her. If's she's standing, she doesn't even like the boys to get close. If she is laying down, even I have to be aware that I don't get "within her zone". IMHO, Greyhounds do have a slightly different body language than other dogs and are very used to "warning" other dogs with growls when they get close and it's different than the growl when you try and take away a toy/treat.

 

It would take much work to get her to a place where someone is going to trust her and she will trust back and with that, an area full of kids is not the place to work on that. She's likely to do better with an experienced greyhound owner that has dealt with issues like this before.

 

Talk to the agency and see what they suggest.

 

Just a note .... all of my greyhounds were either returned or were going to be hard to place - so there are homes for the dogs that are returned for situations like this.

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Guest chickenpotpie

I for one am going to say I'm very sorry it didn't work out, and I'm also going to say something that maybe someone is just not going to like. I would not have a pet in my house that bit me like that. Sorry but no can do, so I totally understand where you're coming from. Do what you need to do. If it wasn't meant to be, better you know sooner than later .

 

I refuse to live in fear and distrust of a pet in my own house, and if it had not worked between us, she would have just had to go. Before Lucky came to us, I had a HORRIBLE fear of dogs that went back to my cousins 8th birthday when their German Shepard bit me and dragged me around like a rag doll.

 

It would be best for you to find the dog that works for your home life/situation.

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I'm sorry if this sounds harsh....

 

Honestly it sounds like she made herself very clear multiple times about not feeling comfortable being touched while she's laying down. This last incident she gave some warning before she launched at you and bite. A tiny freeze, tensing, hardening of the eye, etc. Us humans are not the best at listening to body language all the time.

 

It sounds like this is not the best match for you since you're active and cannot seem to give her enough space to feel secure and comfy. There will be a better suited home for her. Really wish it was before she had a bite history :( Hope you heal up quickly

 

Hopefully your adoption group can give you very closely monitored guidance to work through these issues. Or possible match you with an easier turn key pup. I think the males tend to be more easy going from what I hear. Luckily bounces don't tend to last long before getting a second try in a home. You may want to muzzle her in the house on a daily basis while you decide what to do. It won't hurt her at all and will help you relax around her.

Edited by JAJ2010

------

 

Jessica

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I wrote this post three years ago about our Murray. He's been here for five years and he is my heart dog, my son, my sun. Things can get better if you have a plan and if you can stick with it. There's no shame in returning a dog, though. Do what you need to do. I know how scary and sad it is to be in your situation.

 

murray had terrible sleep/space aggression when we adopted him. he was 5 when we brought him home. he had already been returned to our adoption group twice for biting while asleep. we were told that one of those times he was sleeping in a hallway at night and someone in the family tried to step over him and was bitten. we were both were bitten by murray in the first few weeks we had him. I was bitten over the eye. both times we did exactly what were knew we should not do....petting him on his bed as he was falling asleep. we knew that it would be important to define a place for him to sleep in the house. as his third home we felt a lot of self imposed pressure to make this work for murray. who would want to adopt a dog that bit people in three homes? we did not want to return him, but we couldn't live in fear of him. we committed ourselves to working with Murray. here's what worked for us.

 

we tried crating murray in the first few days that we had him. (not sure why we felt we had to crate him when we were gone....it just seemed like this is what people did when they newly adopted a greyhound.)he broke out on the first day. he tried to bite burke on the second day as burke tried to get him in there. clearly this dog wanted nothing to do with a crate. he was not at all destructive when we went to work, so there was no reason to crate him during the day. we abandoned that plan. we still needed to set some sleeping boundaries with him. we felt that he needed to go to his crate when sleeping/falling asleep. we really wanted him out in the living room with us in the evening, but murray continued to growl at us from his dog bed as we walked around him in our home.

 

our main challenge was getting murray to use his crate for sleeping. we set the crate up in our bedroom, covered it with a sheet to make it denlike, and took the door off. that one thing, removing the door, made all the difference for us. the crate was not a place where he would be locked in. he could come and go. early on, as murray would fall alseep in the living room we sent him to his bed. we would wake him up by calling his name and send him to the crate. sometimes, after a power nap, he would reemerge with us in the living room. some nights he stayed in his safe place for most of the night. anytime he growled at us, we gave him a stern BAH sound to wake him. then we sent to bed in his crate. gradually, over a period of months, he learned to trust us. he spent more and more time with us in the living room. sometimes he would put himself to bed when he was tired. it was funny to watch him get up, say goodnight, and go into the crate (something we never thought he would do!).

 

we have had murray for almost two years. we continue to be aware of his tendency for sleep aggression, but having that safe defined space for sleeping in our house seems to have worked for us and for murray. in the living room, two years later, we can sit on murray's bed with him and pet him. bee wiseman (who came home seven months after murray) can lay near murray on the dogs beds. (bee has her own crate in the bedroom so that both dogs have a safe, designated sleeping area in the house.) in the living room murray does not react at all as she walks near him or if she moves on the bed next to him. he does not seem to care if she is near him. the same goes for us.

 

inside our house the world feels safe to murray. now he spends most of his time out in the living room with us when we are home. we are able to step over or step on his bed when he is on it. we haven't had any growling in over a year. murray is, and will always be, a fearful dog. i'm sure with time your problem will ease as she settles in to the routine in your home. it's amazing how far murray has come in his time with us. with time, came trust. he trusts us, and he is a far less fearful dog now than in those early months when we adopted him.

 

FWIW those crates are long gone (sadly, so is Bee Wiseman), but we are still very respectful of Murray's sleeping/lying down space. He's a completely different hound now. We are so glad that we stuck with him. It took a while, but he turned out to be a fantastic dog. Best of luck to you and Faye. :goodluck

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Tricia with Hopper the terrier mix and Kaia the wolfhound-schnauzer mix
Always missing Murray MaldivesBee Wiseman, River, and Holly
 Oaks Holly 
“You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows.“ -Bob Dylan

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First and foremost I am sorry this has happened to both you and Faye. A dog bite can be very emotionally trying and I understand your reaction and thought that it may best if she is returned. I agree with others that Greys sometimes seem to display subtle warning signs that are hard to pick up on and am sure they are not the only breed as many dogs have bitten their owners for a variety of reasons. The #1 thing that should always be considered when bringing home a Grey is they are not necessary like other dogs at first, they come froma very different environment and will take time to adjust. They are used to communicating to other Greys via lip curling, growling and yes biting and they will do the same to us if we are not careful and watchful. I believe one can work through this type of issue with their Grey however you must be committed to doing so as it will take time and patience. I hope whatever you choose to do, you are able to have a Grey that will suit your lifestyle and will be able to enjoy for many years as it's obvious from your post, you do care for Faye.

Kyle with Stewie ('Super C Ledoux, Super C Sampson x Sing It Blondie) and forever missing my three angels, Jack ('Roy Jack', Greys Flambeau x Miss Cobblepot) and Charlie ('CTR Midas Touch', Leo's Midas x Hallo Argentina) and Shelby ('Shari's Hooty', Flying Viper x Shari Carusi) running free across the bridge.

Gus an coinnich sinn a'rithist my boys and little girl.

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I'm so sorry you were hurt, physically and emotionally. I hope your adoption group will help you decide what to do, and that your dear Faye will find a good new home if you choose to give her up.

 

I wouldn't say she has no bite inhibition. I would say that she felt threatened and trapped. Sometimes it is hard to read an individual dog's signs -- the "I'm not liking this" look can be very subtle.

 

 

My very first greyhound had a slightly different but also scary problem -- occasionally he would startle up from a sound sleep with a snarl and a giant snap. Fortunately he never connected with anything. Our rule for nieces, nephews, visiting children, AND adults, including myself, was quite simply, DO NOT PET, PESTER, BEND OVER, COZY UP TO, ETC. THE DOG WHILE HE IS LYING DOWN. Sometimes they sleep with eyes partly open, so best just assume that if the dog is lying down, he might be sleeping. That one small rule kept us all safe and kept an otherwise exceptionally gentle dog in our home.

Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
We miss Reko Batman (Trouper Zeke x Marque Louisiana), 11/15/95-6/29/06, Rocco the thistledown whippet, 04/29/93-10/14/08, Reko Zema (Mo Kick x Reko Princess), 8/16/98-4/18/10, the most beautiful girl in the whole USA, my good egg Joseph aka Won by a Nose (Oneco Cufflink x Buy Back), 09/22/2003-03/01/2013, and our gentle sweet Gidget (Digitizer, Dodgem by Design x Sobe Mulberry), 1/29/2006-11/22/2014, gone much too soon. Never forgetting CJC's Buckshot, 1/2/07-10/25/10.

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Guest Groundhog

Thank you all for the input, I appreciate it very much. I spoke with our adoption coordinator and have made the sad decision to return Faye. They were understanding and are confident they will find a more experienced greyhound home for her. I fell in love with her and it will take a long time to heal emotionally, but after weighing all the pluses and minuses I know I'm doing the best for her and me.

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A classic case of not enough research, knowledge, etc. prior to adoption and followed up with a lack of caution and awareness. That said, for your situation I think a dog that can roll with the odd mistep or two by the owner would be better for you. There are lots of those. At the very least Faye is obviously of the less forgiving sort and should be returned. At worst she could be considered quite dangerous in her current situation.

 

Don't take it hard, try not to be emotional about it, don't think that you failed. We all make mistakes. There are easier going versions out there, work with your group to get one of these.

 

FWIW I have a dog who to a fault is obsessively, madly in love with me, and I would never think of bending, stepping over him when he is down - not ever. When he is down I approach him on my belly or very low, and only did so after months of gaining his trust. It is a matter of simple respect for his life experience. He is granted this respect always. Regardless of the dog you end up with you should consider this approach.

 

Good luck, don't fret.


Thank you all for the input, I appreciate it very much. I spoke with our adoption coordinator and have made the sad decision to return Faye. They were understanding and are confident they will find a more experienced greyhound home for her. I fell in love with her and it will take a long time to heal emotionally, but after weighing all the pluses and minuses I know I'm doing the best for her and me.

 

Good move IMO. Don't give up on Greys. There is the perfect dog waiting for you. In the meantime I recommend you read as much as you can on this forum and also search Greyhound Articles Online and read everything there (it will take weeks)

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Thank you all for the input, I appreciate it very much. I spoke with our adoption coordinator and have made the sad decision to return Faye. They were understanding and are confident they will find a more experienced greyhound home for her. I fell in love with her and it will take a long time to heal emotionally, but after weighing all the pluses and minuses I know I'm doing the best for her and me.

 

 

Just wondering what happened after the ER visit. Did they call the police and did the police try to remove Faye? Please call The Lexus Project if anything like this is happening. They provide legal defense for dogs, and especially greyhounds... they have 6 of them.

 

I beg you Groundhog, please email thelexusproject@optonline.net or call 516.319.4249 and speak with Robin, even if this is not the way it's going down.... she can offer other help/advice. This is their website for more info http://www.thelexusproject.org/index.php

 

Thank you and I hope you get well soon (physically & emotionally).

 

Claudia

Image removed, not within Signature Guidelines.

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Guest FreddyGirl

As per Robin of the Lexus Project.

Get the dog out of the jurisdiction immediately if not sooner. Animal control will seize the dog and try to kill her. Do NOT give the dog to Animal control under any circumstances.

 

AGAin, get the dog out of the jurisdiction and have the group call Robin immediately.

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I'm so sorry this happened. I get the sense from some of the responses that it sounds like only greys do this, but believe me, this happens to owners of all breeds. I have a scar from a Springer Spaniel we adopted in 1977.

 

It may have something to do with inexperience, but many of us here have reported being bit, and in most cases we did something we knew we shouldn't do. I'm sure Faye will find a good home, the problem doesn't sound insurmountable, Faye and her new family will have some work to do but it can all work out in the right home under the right circumstances.

 

I hope you don't write off greys forever, I've not had to deal with space aggression only resource guarding, but our 2 current greys don't display any forms of aggression at all. We can pet them on their beds, lay with them on their beds, take high-value treats out of their mouth without incident, bend over them, hug them, etc. without any forms of aggression. Please note I don't necessarily do anything I've listed often, e.g. hug them or make them uncomfortable so that they would react.

 

If you want to know what not to do, it would take forever to list, but in general some greys do not like someone bending over top of them, be disturbed while sleeping and/or laying on their bed, or hugging. There are excellent books as well, Patricia McConnell's "The Other End of the Leash" is excellent and you can learn a lot about dog behaviour of any breed.

Jan with precious pups Emmy (Stormin J Flag) and Simon (Nitro Si). Missing my angels: Bailey Buffetbobleclair 11/11/98-17/12/09; Ben Task Rapid Wave 5/5/02-2/11/15; Brooke Glo's Destroyer 7/09/06-21/06/16 and Katie Crazykatiebug 12/11/06 -21/08/21. My blog about grief The reality is that you will grieve forever. You will not get over the loss of a loved one; you will learn to live with it. You will rebuild yourself around the loss you have suffered. You will be whole again but you will never be the same. Nor should you be the same, nor would you want to. Elisabeth Kübler-Ross

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Guest Groundhog

No police were involved, this happened in my home with my dog. She's a wonderful dog and will make someone very, very happy, but it can't be me. I don't think I can get another dog for a very long time.

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Sounds like there is no reason to contact Lexus Project. The owner and the group are doing fine.

 

I'm so sorry that this happened to you. I have been bitten but not that severely. I'm glad that the group is working with you. Will they be picking her up this evening?

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~Beth, with a crazy mixed crew of misfits.
~ Forever and Always missing and loving Steak, Carmen, Ivy, Isis, and Madi.
Don't cry because it's ended, Smile because it happened.
Before you judge me, try to keep an open mind, not everyone likes your taste.

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Guest Groundhog

We're returning her on Saturday morning, and I've been in contact with the people who originally fostered her and they expressed interest in fostering her again. It would go a long way in making Fay more comfortable and easing my heartache about returning her.

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No police were involved, this happened in my home with my dog. She's a wonderful dog and will make someone very, very happy, but it can't be me. I don't think I can get another dog for a very long time.

 

Maybe not necessary, but keep the above advice in mind and the telephone numbers handy just in case. Sometimes going to the ER with a dog bite sets things in motion with animal control that are beyond your control.

 

I know that when I saw a doctor for my dog bite, I had to beg and plead for the doctor NOT to file mandatory paperwork with animal control. He had to fill it out but gave it to me to file and....well, oops...

Valerie w/ Cash (CashforClunkers) & Lucy (Racing School Dropout)
Missing our gorgeous Miss
Diamond (Shorty's Diamond), sweet boy Gabe (Zared) and Holly (ByGollyItsHolly), who never made it home.

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As per Robin of the Lexus Project.

Get the dog out of the jurisdiction immediately if not sooner. Animal control will seize the dog and try to kill her. Do NOT give the dog to Animal control under any circumstances.

 

AGAin, get the dog out of the jurisdiction and have the group call Robin immediately.

DITTO. Do this ASAP, especially if you live in a state that has a euthanize-after-one-bite regulation.

Donna
Molly the Border Collie & Poquita the American-born Podenga

Bridge Babies: Daisy (Positive Delta) 8/7/2000 - 4/6/2115, Agnes--angel Sage's baby (Regall Rosario) 11/12/01 - 12/18/13, Lucky the mix (Found, w 10 puppies 8/96-Bridge 7/28/11, app. age 16) & CoCo (Cosmo Comet) 12/28/89-5/4/04

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I wrote this post three years ago about our Murray. He's been here for five years and he is my heart dog, my son, my sun. Things can get better if you have a plan and if you can stick with it. There's no shame in returning a dog, though. Do what you need to do. I know how scary and sad it is to be in your situation. murray had terrible sleep/space aggression when we adopted him. he was 5 when we brought him home. he had already been returned to our adoption group twice for biting while asleep. we were told that one of those times he was sleeping in a hallway at night and someone in the family tried to step over him and was bitten. we were both were bitten by murray in the first few weeks we had him. I was bitten over the eye. both times we did exactly what were knew we should not do....petting him on his bed as he was falling asleep. we knew that it would be important to define a place for him to sleep in the house. as his third home we felt a lot of self imposed pressure to make this work for murray. who would want to adopt a dog that bit people in three homes? we did not want to return him, but we couldn't live in fear of him. we committed ourselves to working with Murray. here's what worked for us.

we tried crating murray in the first few days that we had him. (not sure why we felt we had to crate him when we were gone....it just seemed like this is what people did when they newly adopted a greyhound.)he broke out on the first day. he tried to bite burke on the second day as burke tried to get him in there. clearly this dog wanted nothing to do with a crate. he was not at all destructive when we went to work, so there was no reason to crate him during the day. we abandoned that plan. we still needed to set some sleeping boundaries with him. we felt that he needed to go to his crate when sleeping/falling asleep. we really wanted him out in the living room with us in the evening, but murray continued to growl at us from his dog bed as we walked around him in our home.

our main challenge was getting murray to use his crate for sleeping. we set the crate up in our bedroom, covered it with a sheet to make it denlike, and took the door off. that one thing, removing the door, made all the difference for us. the crate was not a place where he would be locked in. he could come and go. early on, as murray would fall alseep in the living room we sent him to his bed. we would wake him up by calling his name and send him to the crate. sometimes, after a power nap, he would reemerge with us in the living room. some nights he stayed in his safe place for most of the night. anytime he growled at us, we gave him a stern BAH sound to wake him. then we sent to bed in his crate. gradually, over a period of months, he learned to trust us. he spent more and more time with us in the living room. sometimes he would put himself to bed when he was tired. it was funny to watch him get up, say goodnight, and go into the crate (something we never thought he would do!).

we have had murray for almost two years. we continue to be aware of his tendency for sleep aggression, but having that safe defined space for sleeping in our house seems to have worked for us and for murray. in the living room, two years later, we can sit on murray's bed with him and pet him. bee wiseman (who came home seven months after murray) can lay near murray on the dogs beds. (bee has her own crate in the bedroom so that both dogs have a safe, designated sleeping area in the house.) in the living room murray does not react at all as she walks near him or if she moves on the bed next to him. he does not seem to care if she is near him. the same goes for us.

inside our house the world feels safe to murray. now he spends most of his time out in the living room with us when we are home. we are able to step over or step on his bed when he is on it. we haven't had any growling in over a year. murray is, and will always be, a fearful dog. i'm sure with time your problem will ease as she settles in to the routine in your home. it's amazing how far murray has come in his time with us. with time, came trust. he trusts us, and he is a far less fearful dog now than in those early months when we adopted him.

FWIW those crates are long gone (sadly, so is Bee Wiseman), but we are still very respectful of Murray's sleeping/lying down space. He's a completely different hound now. We are so glad that we stuck with him. It took a while, but he turned out to be a fantastic dog. Best of luck to you and Faye. :goodluck

Tricia, I've never seen that post about Murray before. He sounds like a totally different dog than the laid-back guy I know!

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I'm very sorry about your scary and sad situation. I understand. Although a completely different circumstance, I was severely bitten as a child by a different breed of dog requiring over 75 stitches across my head.

 

If you do get any other dog in the future, please remember the golden rule: Let resting dogs lie. This means any dog resting, whether eyes are open or closed. Best to wait for the dog to be standing up before petting (without bending over dog, and not petting on top of dog's head - both can be seen as a threat to dogs). Better to allow a dog to approach a human when dog is ready for attention. This rule is especially important within the first couple of years while the dog is adjusting to a new life and learning to trust new people. (In addition to other signals mentioned, dogs often yawn as a stress signal, but like previously mentioned, if a dog has been punished for a "warning growl" in his/her past, they may be more likely to skip a growl for a bite.)

 

One of our hounds is an absolute sweetheart 99% of the time, but even after years in retirement, she often awakens herself from a bad dream with sleep aggression. We know to provide her plenty of her own resting space. No one is allowed to approach/invade her bed or resting space.

 

I agree that you are doing the best thing for your family, and for this Greyhound by placing her into a more Greyhound experienced home.

 

 

The following is an excellent article about racing Greyhounds' life before retirement, written by the late, Kathleen Gilley.

 

"This breed has never been asked to do anything for itself, make any decisions or answer any questions. It has been waited on, paw and tail. The only prohibition in a racing Greyhound's life is not to get into a fight-------or eat certain stuff in the turn out pen.

 

Let us review a little. From weaning until you go away for schooling, at probably a year and a half, you eat, grow and run around with your siblings. When you go away to begin your racing career, you get your own "apartment," in a large housing development. No one is allowed in your bed but you, and when you are in there, no one can touch you, without plenty of warning.

Someone hears a vehicle drive up, or the kennel door being unlocked. The light switches are flipped on. The loud mouths in residence, and there always are some, begin to bark or howl. You are wide awake by the time the human opens your door to turn you out. A Greyhound has never been touched while he was asleep. You eat when you are fed, usually on a strict schedule. No one asks if you are hungry or what you want to eat. You are never told not to eat any food within your reach. No one ever touches your bowl while you are eating. You are not to be disturbed because it is important you clean your plate.

You are not asked if you have to "go outside." You are placed in turn out pen and it isn't long before you get the idea of what you are supposed to do while you are out there. Unless you really get out of hand, you may chase, rough house and put your feet on everyone and everything else. The only humans you know are the "waiters" who feed you, and the "restroom attendants" who turn you out to go to the bathroom. Respect people? Surely you jest.

No one comes into or goes out of your kennel without your knowledge. You are all seeing; all knowing. There are no surprises, day in and day out. The only thing it is ever hoped you will do is win, place or show, and that you don't have much control over. It is in your blood, it is in your heart, it is in your fate-- or it is not.

And when it is not, then suddenly you are expected to be a civilized person in a fur coat. But people don't realize you may not even speak English. Some of you don't even know your names, because you didn't need to. You were not asked or told to do anything as an individual; you were always part of the "condo association?; the sorority or fraternity and everyone did everything together, as a group or pack. The only time you did anything as an individual is when you schooled or raced, and even then, You Were Not Alone.

Suddenly, he is expected to behave himself in places he's never been taught how to act. He is expected to take responsibility for saying when he needs to go outside, to come when he is called, not to get on some or all of the furniture, and to not eat food off counters and tables. He is dropped in a world that is not his, and totally without warning, at that.

Almost everything he does is wrong. Suddenly he is a minority. Now he is just a pet. He is unemployed, in a place where people expect him to know the rules and the schedule, even when there aren't any. (How many times have you heard someone say, He won't tell "me when he has to go out. What kind of schedule is that?) Have you heard the joke about the dog who says "My name is No-No Bad " Dog. What's yours? To me that is not even funny. All the "protective barriers are gone. There is no more warning before something happens. There is no more strength in numbers. He wakes up with a monster human face two inches from his. (With some people's breath, this could scare Godzilla.) Why should he not, believe that this someone for lunch? (I really do have to ask you ladies to consider how you would react if someone you barely knew crawled up on you while you were asleep?) No, I will not ask for any male input.

Now he is left alone, for the first time in his life, in a strange place, with no idea of what will happen or how long it will be before someone comes to him again. If he is not crated, he may go through walls, windows or over fences, desperately seeking something familiar, something with which to reconnect his life. If he does get free, he will find the familiarity, within himself: the adrenaline high, the wind in his ears, the blood pulsing and racing though his heart once again--until he crashes into a car.

Often, the first contact with his new family is punishment, something he's never had before, something he doesn't understand now, especially in the middle of the rest of the chaos. And worst of all, what are the most common human reactions to misbehavior? We live in a violent society, where the answer to any irritation is a slap, punch, kick, whip, or rub your nose in it. Under these circumstances, sometimes I think any successful adoption is a miracle.

He is, in effect, expected to have all the manners of at least a six-year old child. But, how many of you would leave an unfamiliar six-year old human alone and loose in your home for hours at a time and not expect to find who knows what when you got back? Consider that if you did, you could be brought up on charges of child abuse, neglect and endangerment. Yet, people do this to Greyhounds and this is often the reason for so many returns.

How many dogs have been returned because they did not know how to tell the adopter when they had to go out? How many for jumping on people, getting on furniture, counter surfing, separation anxiety, or defensive actions due to being startled or hurt (aka growling or biting)? So, let's understand: Sometimes it is the dog's fault" he cannot fit in. He is not equipped "with the social skills of a six-year old human. But you can help him."

End quote.

 

 

Again, I agree that you are doing what's best for this girl and your family by placing her in a Greyhound experienced home soon. I wish you a speedy recovery, physically and emotionally.

Edited by 3greytjoys
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