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Infected Wound


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Atticus got a large gash last week that needed several stitches. The vet had it bandaged when we came home and told us to come back and have it rewrapped if it got wet. It was draining a lot so we ended up going back the next day. The vet said it didn't look infected (the drainage was clear) and told us to keep it bandaged and dry. So we've been changing the bandage every day and its looked okay.

 

Today he went back for a checkup and the vet said it looked good, to leave it unbandaged so it could dry out. When I got home from work it looked fine. Later we noticed his e collar had rubbed it (its on his front lower leg) and it was oozing again, but it was clear. So I put a little neosporin on it, covered it with a sterile pad and wrapped it loosely with gauze to absorb the drainage.

 

I just took that off and now there's a little pus. Our vet is 30 minutes away and we have been there 4 times in the last week so I am reluctant to go back if this is something we can treat at home (also irked that our vet told us to bring him back for bandage changes instead of just showing us how to do it!). He is taking antibiotics and has about a week left on them. We are scheduled to get his stitches out in 6 days.

 

If it were my own arm I would wash away the pus, pat it dry and put neosporin on it. But I have been very reluctant to touch or mess with his wound at all and the vet said we shouldn't wash it.

 

Appreciate any advice!

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Does it still have stitches? If not I'd wash it gently with just water, pat dry and leave it alone. For a lot of wounds I just get them in the tub and slowly run water over the wound. No pressure and usually just use a cup and fill and pour over and over.

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Let your vet look at it. Your vet we be the best judge on how to care for this wound. He/she may want to change the antibiotic, check for pockets...... At the very least give them a phone --perhaps you can even send them a pic??

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If it were me, I'd use a manuka honey dressing. It can be magic for situations like this, and really dries out the wound nicely as well as having a strong antibacterial effect.

 

I'm not going so far as to recommend you do this, because it appears to be going against what your vet has told you, I'm just saying it's what I would do.

 

Here is the method: smear high UMF factor manuka honey (15 or above) on a non-stick dressing and cover the wound with it. It can be left for at least a day (or until the ooze shows through the dressing) before changing it. I used this method when DH's carpal tunnel stitch line got inflamed and leaked pus, and the infection disappeared overnight. The consultant he saw a few days later was most impressed.

 

Ideally the honey should be medical grade, but for surface wounds it's not super-important as long as it comes from an uncontaminated jar.

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The plural of anecdote is not data

Brambleberry Greyhounds My Etsy Shop

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When I got Ace (his owner died), he had 70 stitches in his lower leg from falling off the deck. The woman caring for him had taken him back for a bandage change at three day, but then didn't check it for ten days. It was an oozing mess by the time I got him to my vet. I used Manuka honey as described above, and it healed up great! A small pocket of infection should be an easy fix. This stuff is magic! Speak to your vet. Mine had never heard of it, but now tells everyone about it. She was amazed at the healing. Good luck!

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If it were me, I'd use a manuka honey dressing. It can be magic for situations like this, and really dries out the wound nicely as well as having a strong antibacterial effect.

 

I'm not going so far as to recommend you do this, because it appears to be going against what your vet has told you, I'm just saying it's what I would do.

 

Here is the method: smear high UMF factor manuka honey (15 or above) on a non-stick dressing and cover the wound with it. It can be left for at least a day (or until the ooze shows through the dressing) before changing it. I used this method when DH's carpal tunnel stitch line got inflamed and leaked pus, and the infection disappeared overnight. The consultant he saw a few days later was most impressed.

 

Ideally the honey should be medical grade, but for surface wounds it's not super-important as long as it comes from an uncontaminated jar.

Ditto. In fact double ditto. The stuff is remarkable.

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Guest greyaspet

You adopted Ace? Do you know where the other dog went? How is he doing? Long story about how I know about this and don't want to ramble so just curious about how he is and the other dog.

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Thanks all. Where can I buy the Manuka honey? I've never heard of this. I'm going to call the vet -- her advice not to mess with it was before it was infected. I just really don't want to drive there again and pay another unecessary vet bill for them to do something I can do at home.

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My vet recommended sugar. When I asked about honey he said, "Sure, but that's messier." Not saying manuka honey wouldn't be better. Just saying the sugar component may be the the primary active ingredient.

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I think real manuka honey is available in US only from its importer www.maunkahoneyusa.com At least that's the way it used to be.

What makes it work is not the sugar component / the primary active ingredient if you want to call it that is the UMF. The real deal does make a difference in effectiveness. Like everything else you get what you pay for. Buy a cheap knock off etc and you'll get poor(if any) results compared to the quality imported product. My thinking is that if I go to all the trouble to use it then clearly I need it and I darn sure want it to work so I only use the legitimate imported product and I have been rewarded with SUCCESS. To me its worth the extra$$ the good stuff costs.

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Guest dobiegrey

the stuff that made the difference in Betty's huge wound was Vetericyn VF three time a day than down to two it is wonderful stuff

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You adopted Ace? Do you know where the other dog went? How is he doing? Long story about how I know about this and don't want to ramble so just curious about how he is and the other dog.

Hey greyaspet...tried to pm you but didn't work

I took in Ace and CeeCee as fosters two weeks after I had to put down my two thirteen year old greys in the same day. I adopted both last month. They are doing great. Pm me and we can chat.

 

Apologies to the OP for going off topic. Hope your pup is doing well!

the stuff that made the difference in Betty's huge wound was Vetericyn VF three time a day than down to two it is wonderful stuff

For lesser wounds that don't require honey, I also use this. I used it for the final week on Ace's leg. I first used this on a horse, and was amazed at how quickly the wound healed. Some people use it on themselves, too!

I think real manuka honey is available in US only from its importer www.maunkahoneyusa.com At least that's the way it used to be.

What makes it work is not the sugar component / the primary active ingredient if you want to call it that is the UMF. The real deal does make a difference in effectiveness. Like everything else you get what you pay for. Buy a cheap knock off etc and you'll get poor(if any) results compared to the quality imported product. My thinking is that if I go to all the trouble to use it then clearly I need it and I darn sure want it to work so I only use the legitimate imported product and I have been rewarded with SUCCESS. To me its worth the extra$$ the good stuff costs.

You can get imported manuka honey in health food stores in NJ. It is expensive, but worth it. I think you can also now get it on Amazon.
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I called the vet and she called in a prescription for a different antibiotic. She suggested putting him in a long sleeved t-shirt (in addition to wearing the e-collar) so the would could breathe but he couldn't get at it. She said not to put any ointment on it so it could dry out.

 

Of course right after I spoke to her I called my boyfriend (I was at work and he was home with the dog) who removed the bandage and said there was no longer any pus. So I filled the prescription but haven't started giving it to him since it already looks better.

 

I think the problem was that his e-collar doesn't really fit well and since the wound so low on his leg he could still lick it.

 

Anyway, thanks for all the replies! I may get some manuka honey for future scrapes.

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Looks like you already got this issue resolved, but here's my $0.02. I never wait when it comes to signs of infection. Someone else on GT told me that her dog had happy tail, and the vet's office patched it up with gauze and vet wrap. After a day or so, the dog's tail was seeping and appeared infected. The vet's office said it was fine, just wait out the weekend and come back Monday... The dog ended up losing his entire tail. Tissue can become necrotic, and that creates a whole slew of other problems. So if you suspect infection (pus, weird smell, excessive draining), it's best to get it taken care of ASAP.

 

Oh, another thing to watch out for is wrapping the bandages too tightly. One of my dogs had an issue keeping his dressings on so I figured I'd just wrap it a little tighter. Worst decision ever. If the tissue is losing blood supply, it can become infected and die within a matter of days/hours.

 

Hope Atticus is doing better. :)

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Looks like you already got this issue resolved, but here's my $0.02. I never wait when it comes to signs of infection. Someone else on GT told me that her dog had happy tail, and the vet's office patched it up with gauze and vet wrap. After a day or so, the dog's tail was seeping and appeared infected. The vet's office said it was fine, just wait out the weekend and come back Monday... The dog ended up losing his entire tail. Tissue can become necrotic, and that creates a whole slew of other problems. So if you suspect infection (pus, weird smell, excessive draining), it's best to get it taken care of ASAP.

 

Oh I agree. I had a human friend who had a similar injury to Atticus last year. His got infected and he waited too long to check it out. Had to have another surgery and multiple antibiotic switches to clear it up. It looks like I may have over reacted this time (at least we didn't drive all the way back to the vet!) but -- better safe than sorry!

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Check Whole Foods Market for Manuka honey. You also can order it through Amazon.

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Kathy and Q (CRT Qadeer from Fuzzy's Cannon and CRT Bonnie) and
Jane (WW's Aunt Jane from Trent Lee and Aunt M); photos to come.

Missing Silver (5.19.2005-10.27.2016), Tigger (4.5.2007-3.18.2016),
darling Sam (5.10.2000-8.8.2013), Jacey-Kasey (5.19.2003-8.22.2011), and Oreo (1997-3.30.2006)

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My vet recommended sugar. When I asked about honey he said, "Sure, but that's messier." Not saying manuka honey wouldn't be better. Just saying the sugar component may be the the primary active ingredient.

 

Sugar is also good and was used in field hospitals during WW2 when antibiotics were not available. However, it's not the primary active ingredient in Manuka Honey. As Racindog says, it's the UMF, which stands for 'Unique Manuka Factor'. It used to be that nobody knew what it was, but I read recently that it has been discovered to be methylglyoxal, which is present in most honeys, but the Manuka nectar is extremely rich in a compound which can be converted to methylglyoxal, and so it's present in Manuka honey in concentrated amounts.

 

There is also hydrogen Peroxide in pretty much all honey, which adds to the 'disinfectant' effect of a honey dressing. Sugar is good, honey is good, but Manuka honey is way better!

 

If you're interested there's quite a nice explanation here.

 

Like everything else you get what you pay for. Buy a cheap knock off etc and you'll get poor(if any) results compared to the quality imported product. My thinking is that if I go to all the trouble to use it then clearly I need it and I darn sure want it to work so I only use the legitimate imported product and I have been rewarded with SUCCESS. To me its worth the extra$$ the good stuff costs.

 

We can buy Manuka honey in supermarkets, chemists (pharmacies) and health food stores here. But as you say, it's important to remember that you get what you pay for. One of the big brands here is Comvita, which is nearly always the most expensive available, but you get a quality product. The higher the UMF, the higher the price, too. The good news is that it does not 'go off'. It might crystallise, but it's good to the bottom of the jar, no matter how long you keep it.

 

If you use it to dress wounds, though, it is still important not to contaminate your supply, and it's probably better to buy medical grade if you can. I kind of cheat. If it's a deep wound, I use honey 'ointment' which I buy online from the New Zealand Honey Shop. All it is is Manuka honey, but it's sterilised and qualifies as 'medical grade'. :)

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The plural of anecdote is not data

Brambleberry Greyhounds My Etsy Shop

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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

Why don't you use his muzzle with a poop guard instead of the big clunky ecollar? Just a thought it would probably make him a bit happier since he should be used to wearing a muzzle. Or is Atticus not a retired racer?

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Why don't you use his muzzle with a poop guard instead of the big clunky ecollar? Just a thought it would probably make him a bit happier since he should be used to wearing a muzzle. Or is Atticus not a retired racer?

 

He is and we have one that he is relatively comfortable wearing. I've never heard of a poop guard and don't have one. I thought about using the muzzle but he would still be able to lick it through the large holes, and even if he couldn't he could rub it against the wound and break the scabs. Even the e-collar, which is smooth, has a little lip that rubbed it a little too much when he lay with his head on his paws.

 

We've had him in a long-sleeved t-shirt all weekend and that has worked for the most part. If we're in the room with him we can leave the e-collar off and he doesn't bother it (with occasional discouragement from us). Yesterday we noticed that one of the stitches had come out, and as of this morning about half of them have. It's not draining but the scabs broke and it is wet where the stitches came out. It doesn't look infected and our appt. to get the stiches out is Wednesday so I'm not terribly worried. But my BF is going to call the vet this morning anyway.

 

We're going on vacation in two weeks so I'm just anxious that this won't be healed up by then.

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You could order a poop guard here. Short-term, you can cover the holes of the muzzle with duck tape. You might leave a strategically located hole open so he can get water, but cover the ones he'd get his tongue through to lick.

 

Cut the toes off an old sock--or cut a sleeve out of an old sweatshirt--pull the tube of fabric up over his leg, and tape the tube above the wound. That would keep the muzzle from scraping the wound (esp. the sweatshirt, which would be heavier fabric), but still let air get to the wound.

 

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My first girl once squabbled with her brother and got nipped in the crease of her elbow. Little wound, the size of the tip of my little finger, but by the time we got to the ER (it was Friday night, of course), it had stretched and torn enough to warrant 4 stitches. She never left the wound alone, and you can see the scar she left herself. On the vet's advice, I left her muzzled (with poop guard) with the wound uncovered. In retrospect, I wish I'd tried a sweatshirt sleeve with enough padding to deflect the muzzle.

15060353021_97558ce7da.jpg
Kathy and Q (CRT Qadeer from Fuzzy's Cannon and CRT Bonnie) and
Jane (WW's Aunt Jane from Trent Lee and Aunt M); photos to come.

Missing Silver (5.19.2005-10.27.2016), Tigger (4.5.2007-3.18.2016),
darling Sam (5.10.2000-8.8.2013), Jacey-Kasey (5.19.2003-8.22.2011), and Oreo (1997-3.30.2006)

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