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Adopting Greyhound - Is This Food Brand Suitable? (United Kingdom)


Guest Carla21
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Guest Carla21

I am looking into adopting a greyhound. it will be my first dog. i know that when you first get a greyhound, they reccomend that you feed them on the food that they've been eating in the kennels and new food should be added slowly. but for convience sakes, eventually i would like to switch them to a brand that they sell in petsmart.

 

Its called Supadog Greyhound and Lurcher 12.5kg

 

Can someone tell me if this brand is suitable ?

 

33483.jpg

 

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Guest Doggone

Just jumping in because I've haven't heard of this brand in the U.S. U.S. folks, is it available in the U.S. somewhere and if so, is it a good product? I'm interested in the responses you get.

 

Ditto :)..........I'd be interested in checking this out, too.

 

OP: Is there a website that you can check that lists the ratings of the UK dog foods? We have them here and I'd guess that they're also in other countries, albeit under different names.

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Guest Carla21

here is a write up on it. apparently it contains extra stuff for the greys. im sure it is fine for a greyhound its just iv never had a greyhound or a dog before so i wanted some opinions from greyhound owners on weather this is suitable or not

 

  • Helps stiff joints, great for overworked legs
  • Contains Omega 3 - Omega 3 is beneficial in helping temperature regulation and promoting a glossy coat and healthy skin
  • Help digestive health and beet pulp to aid healthy digestion
  • Protein is deliberately at a slightly lower level as required by pet Greyhounds and Lurchers Too much protein may cause anxiety and hyperactivity
  • Carbohydrate is a balance of maize and locally sourced wheat for sustainable energy
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The ingredients are:

Wheat, Chicken Meal (14%), Maize, Wheat Feed, Beet Pulp, Poultry fat, Yeast, Fish Oil, (Omega 3 and fatty acids 0.2%), Monocalcium Phosphate, Salt, Fructo-oligosaccharides, Glucosamine 400mg/kg, Yucca Extract.

Nothing spectacular imo relating to greyhounds other than maybe the beet pulp to firm things up. Personally, I think the "breed" diets are a bit of a gimmick, people see their breed on the front and want to buy it. But...not to say it won't work, only to beware of gimmicks and claims of magical ingredients. The only way to really tell, no matter what people say, is to try some out and see what works best, as greys seem to be super sensitive :)

 

 

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Guest Carla21

The ingredients are:

Wheat, Chicken Meal (14%), Maize, Wheat Feed, Beet Pulp, Poultry fat, Yeast, Fish Oil, (Omega 3 and fatty acids 0.2%), Monocalcium Phosphate, Salt, Fructo-oligosaccharides, Glucosamine 400mg/kg, Yucca Extract.

 

 

Nothing spectacular imo relating to greyhounds other than maybe the beet pulp to firm things up. Personally, I think the "breed" diets are a bit of a gimmick, people see their breed on the front and want to buy it. But...not to say it won't work, only to beware of gimmicks and claims of magical ingredients. The only way to really tell, no matter what people say, is to try some out and see what works best, as greys seem to be super sensitive :)

 

 

 

what band do you feed your greys?

Edited by Carla21
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what band do you feed your greys?

 

 

I make most of my dog food myself.

 

There are MANY threads on what people feed here, but honestly I don't know if they are overly helpful as people ALL have different opinions and philosophies on what they will feed and what not, as well as the fact that what one dog does well on might not work for another. Ten people will say 10 different foods and will argue their opinion for it. If this will be your first dog it may be helpful asking the rescue group what a lot of adopters feed and find success with, and if you like this food and it's convenient there is no harm in picking a bag up to try.

 

 

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Wheat the first ingredient is not a good idea.

"Then God sent the Greyhound to live among man and remember. And when the day comes God will call the Greyhound to give Testament, and God will pass judgment on man."

Persian Proverb

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Guest Scouts_mom

The only way you will really know is to try it. Does it make the dog's poop firm? Is the dog's coat nice and shiny? I have never seen that brand in the US. "Lurchers" is primarily a British term (except in the Greyhound community) so I suspect this food is only found in the UK. The group you adopt your dog from will be able to tell you what foods their people have found that work well with greyhounds.

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Honestly, the best food is what works for YOUR dog. And they're all different. Obviously as pet owners we want to try to feed our dogs the highest quality nutrition based on the opinions we have formed through research, word of mouth, speaking to our veterinarian, advertisements, etc. But your dog might have other ideas.

 

Prime example... I'm a veterinarian so I am very leery of "pet store foods". The Blue Buffalo commercials drive me absolutely bonkers (want to talk about a gimmick... that whole commercial is full of them... but I digress). I always feed a veterinary brand of food. Summit eats Hill's J/D and Kili took me several foods to find something that worked which ended up being Purina Veterinary Pediatric. Well the last month and a half I have been battling diarrhea/soft stool issues with Kili. I've done all her basic work up and she's clean (no parasites, etc.). So I finally decided to try switching her food. Couldn't really come up with a puppy food in any of the veterinary lines that had absolutely zero chicken in it (most had at least a small amount) so I sucked it up and went to the pet store. Only thing they really had with no chicken that was a true puppy food (not an "All Life Stages" food) was Taste of the Wild. I'm not a huge fan of TOTW personally. But I bought the food. I'm switching her over, and so far (fingers crossed) so good. Killed me a little inside to buy TOTW at the pet store. But if that's what works for her then that is really the only part that really matters in the end.

 

So pick something that you're comfortable with, that's in budget, and just give it a try. If it doesn't work you try something else. Sometimes it takes a couple of foods to get it right, and that's ok.

Kristie and the Apex Agility Greyhounds: Kili (ATChC AgMCh Lakilanni Where Eagles Fly RN IP MSCDC MTRDC ExS Bronze ExJ Bronze ) and Kenna (Lakilanni Kiss The Sky RN MADC MJDC AGDC AGEx AGExJ). Waiting at the Bridge: Retired racer Summit (Bbf Dropout) May 5, 2005-Jan 30, 2019

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Guest Carla21

Honestly, the best food is what works for YOUR dog. And they're all different. Obviously as pet owners we want to try to feed our dogs the highest quality nutrition based on the opinions we have formed through research, word of mouth, speaking to our veterinarian, advertisements, etc. But your dog might have other ideas.

 

Prime example... I'm a veterinarian so I am very leery of "pet store foods". The Blue Buffalo commercials drive me absolutely bonkers (want to talk about a gimmick... that whole commercial is full of them... but I digress). I always feed a veterinary brand of food. Summit eats Hill's J/D and Kili took me several foods to find something that worked which ended up being Purina Veterinary Pediatric. Well the last month and a half I have been battling diarrhea/soft stool issues with Kili. I've done all her basic work up and she's clean (no parasites, etc.). So I finally decided to try switching her food. Couldn't really come up with a puppy food in any of the veterinary lines that had absolutely zero chicken in it (most had at least a small amount) so I sucked it up and went to the pet store. Only thing they really had with no chicken that was a true puppy food (not an "All Life Stages" food) was Taste of the Wild. I'm not a huge fan of TOTW personally. But I bought the food. I'm switching her over, and so far (fingers crossed) so good. Killed me a little inside to buy TOTW at the pet store. But if that's what works for her then that is really the only part that really matters in the end.

 

So pick something that you're comfortable with, that's in budget, and just give it a try. If it doesn't work you try something else. Sometimes it takes a couple of foods to get it right, and that's ok.

 

ok. when i first get him i will stick to what theyve been feeding him then ill probably just ask the shelter about different brands or ask my vet. the main reason i chose that one is becase its the only greyhound one they have at petsmart, and i wanted something that would be easy to pick up once i ran out. if i switch to something else i will probably have to order it online everytime i run out or keep going bak to the shelter which is 30 minutes from me. but yeah anyway ill have a talkk with the shelter when i get him. thanks for your help

 

Wheat the first ingredient is not a good idea.

 

is wheat not good for them?

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Pinned at the top of this forum is a thread called Grades for Dog Kibble. It provides a system for grading dog kibbles by the order of their ingredients, which may be helpful for you in becoming familiar with what people believe are the most important components for a dog kibble. The first listed ingredient is in the greatest quantity, and then lower and lower down the list. There is also a web site, although it is a U.S. one, called Dog Food Advisor, http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/

 

It reviews various dog foods, and its explanations of what qualities it values, and what qualities it does not, is very enlightening. Generally you would not want a grain as the first ingredient in kibble; it should be a meat (and not meat byproduct) ingredient.

 

I did not know that lower protein levels were desirable for greyhounds. I wonder if it is true.

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Guest Carla21

Pinned at the top of this forum is a thread called Grades for Dog Kibble. It provides a system for grading dog kibbles by the order of their ingredients, which may be helpful for you in becoming familiar with what people believe are the most important components for a dog kibble. The first listed ingredient is in the greatest quantity, and then lower and lower down the list. There is also a web site, although it is a U.S. one, called Dog Food Advisor, http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/

 

It reviews various dog foods, and its explanations of what qualities it values, and what qualities it does not, is very enlightening. Generally you would not want a grain as the first ingredient in kibble; it should be a meat (and not meat byproduct) ingredient.

 

I did not know that lower protein levels were desirable for greyhounds. I wonder if it is true.

 

thanks for your advice. but i think i will just ask at the kennel and the vet which food they reccomend and i will just have to look around for the easiest way to buy more when i run out. i dont like the idea of having to order it online everytime i run out. i would much rather be able to pick it up locally at a store.

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I've been through several UK brands including the real VAT-free Greyhound bags.

Iams green bag i found to be good for firming loose poops but you have to go through a couple of weeks of room-emptying gas toots.

What works well now is one i get from the local garden centre, a Turkey & Rice kibble called Super Premium. It comes in sliver bags with blue paw prints. Same as the one in the link but badged for the garden centre and around £20 per bag.

http://www.hungryhounds.co.uk/home/turkey-rice-super-premium-hypoallergenic/

it looks very similar to James Wellbeloved or Burns to me.

 

Wheat is best avoided, chicken often too. Turkey, Duck and Fish are better meat sources for dogs who cannot tolerate high percentages of poultry protein. Transition from one brand to another over a week and don't think you're done with testing it until after a further fortnight.

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http://www.whichdogfood.co.uk/

Is useful to compare and gives info on ingredients. I personally wouldn't feed the supadog one but know lots do and are happy with it. In that price range is Autarky salmon (chicken isn't as good) and Skinner's field & trial duck or salmon & rice which are better ingredients wise and are VAT free . I order online with free delivery so that increases options on whats stocked locally My greyhounds have done well on both, but it can be trial & error as to what suit's I've one grey that gets toxic farts & sloppy poops on any chicken kibble.

Edited by moofie
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I did not know that lower protein levels were desirable for greyhounds. I wonder if it is true.

The greyhound groups tend to advise feeding <20% protein for retired greys. I personally feel its a bit simplistic and doesn't take into account the quality of the protein source or quantity fed.

 

I occasionally feed a wet food which is labelled as 12% protein but if you remove the moisture content to compare properly with kibble its actually much higher.

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I'm pretty sure the Burgess Supadog was one I tried for Doc, when I first adopted him. (Seven years ago - where did the time go?!) But it wasn't a great success - I gave up after the first bag, because he didn't like it much, and all the fillers it made him poop a lot.

 

As others have said, the important thing is to find a product that suits your individual dog, and that may take a bit of experimentation. The whichdogfood website link that moofie gave is useful for comparing ingredients, though I see its 'expert' only gives Doc's dry food one star! That's Gusto, a cheaper line from the firm that makes Autarky. I'm sure it contains more cereals than some would countenance, but he enjoys it, and it suits his constitution... I have always added some wet stuff to it however, as the rescue suggested - greyhounds get used to fairly sloppy food in their racing days. These days that is usually a block of minced meat or tripe from the pet shop, as he is an old boy and needs the extra protein. If tinned food is more convenient, Butchers' Tripe would be my suggestion - the original formula 'tripe loaf' one - cheap, readily available, doesn't contain any cereals.

Clare with Tiger (Snapper Gar, b. 18/05/2015), and remembering Ken (Boomtown Ken, 01/05/2011-21/02/2020) and Doc (Barefoot Doctor, 20/08/2001-15/04/2015).

"It is also to be noted of every species, that the handsomest of each move best ... and beasts of the most elegant form, always excel in speed; of this, the horse and greyhound are beautiful examples."----Wiliam Hogarth, The Analysis of Beauty, 1753.

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