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Weird And Annoying Vet Visit


Guest AngelPup
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Also, I do realize the dangers of raw hide, but I thought there were some that were safe--like molded, American-made, rawhide. And what about American-made bully sticks? I really just want to find a good chewy that will keep him occupied, satisfy his need to chew (Nylabone just isn't doing it), and help keep his teeth clean and in good order. I did buy a bone that can be stuffed with peanut butter/cheese spread, but it's VERY hard and I read somewhere that a dogs teeth can chip or crack chewing on them.... Wow, never gave it a second thought when giving my other dogs chew treats. I just don't want him to get sick or give him something that is likely to hurt him.

 

I give my guys lots of different animal-based chewies. Knee and knuckle bones, rawhide rolls, pig ears, etc. If your dog is an aggressive chewer, there can be risks with them chipping teeth. But I've had absolutely no problems, and my guys' teeth look excellent. It's a personal decision- I wouldn't worry too much about it.

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I just started giving our girl bully sticks because no matter what we do, she has horrendous teeth.

Not tarter, just a dark film that she gets on them.

It's working. Little by little it's starting to scrape the film away. I let her chew one for about 2 hours

every other day.

 

No rawhides here though - our first girl almost choked to death on one, and our second girl cracked a tooth

and had to have it pulled and a bone graft put in after chewing on a Nylabone.

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I just switched vet's today--Murphy has a follow up appointment with the new vet about his UTI this afternoon. The first vet we tried, there were always problems with the office staff, their hours were insufficient, but most importantly I got the impression they cared about the dogs, but they were "just dogs" if you know what I mean. I realized after the situation with Murphy's lump and the way it was handled, I wasn't ever going to really trust them.

 

So I'm very hopeful about the new vet--the practice came recommended by someone who has a similar relationship with her dogs to ours and the receptionist was very helpful, the hours are much better. The practice has about 1/2 dozen vets, but Murphy is scheduled to see the vet who currently sees most of their greyhound clients.

Beth, Petey (8 September 2018- ), and Faith (22 March 2019). Godspeed Patrick (28 April 1999 - 5 August 2012), Murphy (23 June 2004 - 27 July 2013), Leo (1 May 2009 - 27 January 2020), and Henry (10 August 2010 - 7 August 2020), you were loved more than you can know.

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Vet sounds like her bedside manners needs a major attitude adjustment. I never had a vet who used the word "nasty" when referring to my animals. If I had-that would be our last visit. Regarding stairs, I live on the 3rd floor of a building that does not have an elevator. All my greyhounds-past and present have learned the stairs in a few days. They bound up and down without a problem. I give my guys all kinds of animal bone chews, including bully sticks, spiral flossies, antlers and twice a week raw beef bones, (just not the weight bearing heavy bones, these can chip their teeth). I also every once in a while give them a Kong with peanut butter-which they too love. I never had any problems with any of these items. I also don't like vets who push products and unnecessary vaccinations-some are overly careful and tend to overdo it. Other then a yearly rabies vax, which is required by law-I titer my dogs and never had a problem. I would definitely go back to your regular vet.

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Guest AngelPup

Thanks for all the great feedback everyone. RhodyGreys recommended some great grey-savvy vets and one is in my area, so I'm going to check them out. The only thing I don't like about my old vet is their office hours--basic daytime with no evening hours. I'm done with this vet. I want our entire family, especially Brady, to have a positive experience at the vet's.

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Guest Bean_Scotch

I go to a few different in vets, depending on the need.

 

The vets offices around here are around 500.00 PER dental. I have 5 dogs. NOT happening....

 

I take my dogs 2hrs away to a vet to get their dentals, and if necessary any vaccinations while we're there. It's about 150.00 per dental. I go here once a year, usually around tax refund time. I'll see all but one vet. She put down one of my dogs, and besides jabbing him with a needle making him bleed and scream, whereby which we had to muzzle him, before she euthanized him and didn't have a care in the world. If I could take her and chuck her up against a wall I would. This was the first time I EVER had to put down a dog and it was a horrible experience.

 

If I just need vaccinations, I take them to a vet just down the street that I probably wouldn't trust with anything else. I'll see anyone. Any vet can vaccinate a dog.

 

If I have a mysterious limp, issue, etc. I take them to the expensive Greyhound vet in town. I'll only see 1 vet in this practice. The Greyhound one.

 

I purcahse ALL my HW meds/Flea preventatives online. My dogs have never had parasites or tested positive for Heartworms. I use Interceptor Spectrum and Certifiect. Frontline Plus is a joke, and my dogs got hookworms while on Heartgard.

 

www.bestvaluepetsupplies.com is where I get my HW/Flea/tick stuff from. Super service.

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Guest DeniseL

I take my dogs 2hrs away to a vet to get their dentals, and if necessary any vaccinations while we're there. It's about 150.00 per dental. I go here once a year, usually around tax refund time. I'll see all but one vet. She put down one of my dogs, and besides jabbing him with a needle making him bleed and scream, whereby which we had to muzzle him, before she euthanized him and didn't have a care in the world. If I could take her and chuck her up against a wall I would. This was the first time I EVER had to put down a dog and it was a horrible experience.

 

 

I had almost this same experience :( When it was time for my love Maya to go to the bridge, I knew it was THE TIME. I had planned on our reg vet coming to the house, but she could not come until the following night, and I could not watch her suffer. We raced to the office and the attending vet that was there was just horrible. It was late, but they rushed me into a room and he basically wouldn't even talk to me. I was HYSTERICAL and he was cold and callus. He made me pull out my credit card in the exam room and pay before he would do anything. Mind you I had been using that same practice for many years. Luckily he was also efficient and Maya went painlessly. (Although I was def not the peaceful and comforting mommy that I swore I would be, I was a MESS, sobbing on her as she left, hopefully I will do better when the time comes again) Bedside manner is everything. Especially when it is a rough diagnosis or when you have to let go. I never went back to that practice again. The vet that helped us that day was the "head vet" and I don't think I would ever want to see him again.

 

The vet we go to now is awesome. In fact, all three vets that are there are awesome. I am so happy with them. I never feel rushed and they always have the time to fit us in. They dote on all the hounds, especially Izzy. And our regular vet is very grey savy and knew all about galgos. And they don't rush you. He explains everything in depth. Thankfully, they email you discharge notes, because I can never retain everything he says lol

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Guest Maire

I'm very luck since I moved to Omaha from St. Louis....my new Vet here has 2 greyhounds of her own ! :pepper

I agree to go with your gut reaction from the first visit.

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Just want to make a quick comment about something Bean_Scotch made "any vet can vaccinate a dog"--while that's true it's the exam during the vaccine visit that important. I can't begin to tell you how many times with pick up health problems during routine exams. Recently we had a woman come into the clinic for "just a vaccine"--explained we need to do an exam-while she protested she finally agreed (if she wanted just vaccine she could have gone to Petco). Well, much to her surprise we diagnosed lymphoma in her dog. He did not get the vaccine. Just an FYI.

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Just want to make a quick comment about something Bean_Scotch made "any vet can vaccinate a dog"--while that's true it's the exam during the vaccine visit that important. I can't begin to tell you how many times with pick up health problems during routine exams. Recently we had a woman come into the clinic for "just a vaccine"--explained we need to do an exam-while she protested she finally agreed (if she wanted just vaccine she could have gone to Petco). Well, much to her surprise we diagnosed lymphoma in her dog. He did not get the vaccine. Just an FYI.

 

Just wanted to second tbhounds' message about the importance of routine physical exams. Vaccinations should not be the focus of regular 'wellness' visits. Rather, the focus should be on assessing the pet's overall health status, including a thorough physical exam, labwork if indicated, as well as addressing any ongoing concerns which may not have been perceived as important enough to prompt a vet visit in itself.

 

It's also about educating owners on maintenance issues like weight, diet, dental care, behavior, and informing them of the signs to monitor for that may indicate problems as a pet ages. These are all topics that may be covered at a good yearly wellness visit, all tailored to the needs of the individual case, and vaccinations may or may not even be a necessary part of the package (or may need to be delayed or avoided based on the physical exam findings).

 

While an extremely experienced and observant owner may not benefit as much from a thorough wellness visit like this, the majority of owners will, and there are also many problems which may be detected on a thorough medical exam which would not be obvious at home. Things like the development of a heart murmur, or enlarged lymph nodes, like in the example tbhounds gave.

 

I do understand the perspective of those who choose to use different vets or even vaccine clinics for certain services. But it is also beneficial to have a single primary vet or clinic who knows your dog well and is familiar with your dog's entire medical history.

Jennifer &

Willow (Wilma Waggle), Wiki (Wiki Hard Ten), Carter (Let's Get It On),

Ollie (whippet), Gracie (whippet x), & Terra (whippet) + Just Saying + Just Alice

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Many vets have taught me the same thing about avoiding bones, Bully Sticks, rawhide, pigs ears, hooves, antlers, etc. (I concur.)

 

I've read/seen many news reports about risks of ordering medications on-line (for pets or humans). Here are a few things to consider before buying medications on-line:

 

1. Buyer beware: No guarantee the medications are the correct drug, or the correct dosage. (Often with questionable origin, shipping, and poor storage practices. Outside of country is higher product risk along with increased shipping/handling risk.)

 

2. Drug manufacturers list specific "controlled temperatures" (and environment) in which medications must be stored to be safe and effective. Mail order packages often sit in peoples' hot metal mailboxes (oven-baked by sun all day, or frozen cold in winter), or packages sit on a porch in hot/cold/humid/rainy weather while people are at work all day. These conditions and temperatures often far exceed safe temperatures for medications.

 

3. Drug manufacturers can't guarantee uncontrolled, unregulated, illegal on-line products.

 

I'm surprised that vet made a comment about not bothering to try to teach your hound stairs. That's too bad. (All of our hounds, our fosters, and most other adopters who have stairs have successfully taught their Greys to walk up/down stairs within a very short time. It usually takes one training session here, but watching other hounds speeds training.)

 

We also have a hound with a big bite out of his ear that happened prior to his retirement (possibly unneutered males fighting during a kennel turnout). Even so, he's been a wonderful welcoming canine host to our other fosters and hound visitors at home. Our vet doesn't always get to see his most affectionate behavior; he had some scary medical experiences in his past life.

 

Good luck with whomever you decide to see. I agree that trusting your vet and having a good relationship with her/him is very important. :)

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Guest AngelPup

Many vets have taught me the same thing about avoiding bones, Bully Sticks, rawhide, pigs ears, hooves, antlers, etc. (I concur.)

 

I've read/seen many news reports about risks of ordering medications on-line (for pets or humans). Here are a few things to consider before buying medications on-line:

 

1. Buyer beware: No guarantee the medications are the correct drug, or the correct dosage. (Often with questionable origin, shipping, and poor storage practices. Outside of country is higher product risk along with increased shipping/handling risk.)

 

2. Drug manufacturers list specific "controlled temperatures" (and environment) in which medications must be stored to be safe and effective. Mail order packages often sit in peoples' hot metal mailboxes (oven-baked by sun all day, or frozen cold in winter), or packages sit on a porch in hot/cold/humid/rainy weather while people are at work all day. These conditions and temperatures often far exceed safe temperatures for medications.

 

3. Drug manufacturers can't guarantee uncontrolled, unregulated, illegal on-line products.

 

I'm surprised that vet made a comment about not bothering to try to teach your hound stairs. That's too bad. (All of our hounds, our fosters, and most other adopters who have stairs have successfully taught their Greys to walk up/down stairs within a very short time. It usually takes one training session here, but watching other hounds speeds training.)

 

We also have a hound with a big bite out of his ear that happened prior to his retirement (possibly unneutered males fighting during a kennel turnout). Even so, he's been a wonderful welcoming canine host to our other fosters and hound visitors at home. Our vet doesn't always get to see his most affectionate behavior; he had some scary medical experiences in his past life.

 

Good luck with whomever you decide to see. I agree that trusting your vet and having a good relationship with her/him is very important. :)

 

Thanks for the information and advice. It all makes sense to me and seems very reasonable. While I'd like to keep things as inexpensive as possible. It's not worth being penny wise and pound foolish. For a few extra bucks, I'll stick with getting meds at our vet's office.

 

I don't like rawhides, but I always thought the other, tougher natural items were safe (as long as they're from the US). I haven't even given him the hard bone I bought that can be stuffed because I'm afraid he will crack a tooth. He does seem to like his blue Nylabone with the nubs on it to clean his teeth, but doesn't appear to be a major chewer.

 

As far as the vet commenting on greyhounds being nasty to each other. Yes, I can imagine that there are scuffles, but that could happen with any breed--especially when they are in tact, and much more with some 'fighting/guarding' breeds. Personally, I've never seen a breed get along so well together as greyhounds. I think the main reason I was becoming annoyed with this vet was because she didn't really have many (or any) POSITIVE things to say. I can easily come up with many more positives about Greyhounds than negatives.

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Just wanted to second tbhounds' message about the importance of routine physical exams. Vaccinations should not be the focus of regular 'wellness' visits. Rather, the focus should be on assessing the pet's overall health status, including a thorough physical exam, labwork if indicated, as well as addressing any ongoing concerns which may not have been perceived as important enough to prompt a vet visit in itself.

 

It's also about educating owners on maintenance issues like weight, diet, dental care, behavior, and informing them of the signs to monitor for that may indicate problems as a pet ages. These are all topics that may be covered at a good yearly wellness visit, all tailored to the needs of the individual case, and vaccinations may or may not even be a necessary part of the package (or may need to be delayed or avoided based on the physical exam findings).

 

While an extremely experienced and observant owner may not benefit as much from a thorough wellness visit like this, the majority of owners will, and there are also many problems which may be detected on a thorough medical exam which would not be obvious at home. Things like the development of a heart murmur, or enlarged lymph nodes, like in the example tbhounds gave.

 

I do understand the perspective of those who choose to use different vets or even vaccine clinics for certain services. But it is also beneficial to have a single primary vet or clinic who knows your dog well and is familiar with your dog's entire medical history.

Working primarily with one vet, while getting to know her partners for emergencies, has always worked well for me. Not only does your vet get to know your dog(s), but they get to know you. How much medical information do you want, what's your level of understanding of medical information vs. what do you need explained, what role would you like your vet to play in helping you make difficult decisions, etc., what else has happened to your pets in the past that might make it difficult to make a particular decision.

Beth, Petey (8 September 2018- ), and Faith (22 March 2019). Godspeed Patrick (28 April 1999 - 5 August 2012), Murphy (23 June 2004 - 27 July 2013), Leo (1 May 2009 - 27 January 2020), and Henry (10 August 2010 - 7 August 2020), you were loved more than you can know.

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Guest houndog990

I agree with bedside manner not in sync with yours. I love my tell-it-like-it-is vet. However my friend finds her harsh and unemotional. At the end of the day you need to feel confidence with your vet and it sounds like you don't have that with this one.

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Guest iconsmum

i'm in Ontario and I find that lots, if not most vets have very little to say about greyhounds that comes from firsthand information. So up here you get a lot of kneejerk reaction to them passed off as fact to the owner...vet: "oh, poor thing, now you're. safe" (huh?) "those marks on his hide are from rough treatment" (?) "they're ALL so quiet and calm" (mine can outbark a terrier) etc... so maybe it's just a bit of bs'ing.

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I'm very happy to say that our vets here are excellent - knowledgeable and willing to listen or research when I ask/tell them about things I've read about on GT and elsewhere. I always run new-to-me info by my primary vet and she always takes the time to either explain (or find out about) things I have asked her about. I feel that she loves them almost as much as I do! She's worth her weight in gold! The other vet in the practice is new/younger but is also excellent about explaining what's going on (I use her mainly for the cat). This is a small town and we are very lucky to have both of them here!

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Guest AngelPup

You are definitely VERY lucky to have such a great vet. It can be hard to find a good any-kind-of doctor, so when you get one, stick with them!

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The "new" vet knows crap about greys. Not really uncommon - my vet here didn't know a grey from a straw hat - but if you went there because you were told they knew about greys - you were misled.

 

I'd switch back if you liked your previous vet. Even if she wasn't a grey expert - if she cared for your dog - all good.

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I would not go back either. I used to take mine to a vet that did well with them, then there was an emergency with a dog in one of the kennels. I recommended calling this vet and the office said that they did not deal with greyhounds. This was an emergency and they still would not see her. I never went back.

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Guest GreyLaw

I do have to agree that bedside manner is a HUGE PLUS with me, but I did learn through a very heartwrenching experience with my last greyhound that sometimes the more "gruff" or "seasoned" vets are great as well. I'd always felt that one of the vets at the practice was too gruff, and therefore never went to him. When my girl was diagnosed with pancreatitis, the 'nicer' vet just never was able to cure her, because I think that she was too wrapped up in trying to be nice and doing what she thought I wanted, rather than what my girl needed. As a very kind gesture, she sent the 'gruff' veterinarian (who is also my neighbor and owned the practice) to my house to see my girl on his way home when Meadow just wasn't recovering after 2 weeks of IV therapy. When she first went in, we had suspected that she had osteo, but the nice vet was NOT able to read the xray well enough to see it. Then the pancreatitis ensued from the meds she was on for the ?osteo?.... Well, the "gruff" vet came to my house, sat down, felt her shoulder, and immediately told us to get her back to the practice the next morning first thing. He saw her, xrayed her shoulder, and immediately diagnosed her with Osteo in her shoulder, and told us that the pancreatitis should have been cured by now and couldn't believe the other vet didn't keep our girl for the full 48 hour protocol. We had to put her to sleep the next morning due to the severity of the Osteo, but are forever grateful to the 'gruff' vet for FINALLY giving us the answers we needed.....

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Grey savvy for day to day care is way overrated. As long as you educate yourself and your vet is willing to be grey educated any competent vet can easily learn to take care of normal greyhound care. My old vet at VCA Lakewood didn't know a lot about greys but he learned from dealing with my dogs and fosters and reading suggested articles he is now on the preffered vet list for one of the big adoption groups here. GFNC has a nifty wallet size card that lists the big differences between greys and other breeds.

 

My main vet went to Ohio State and Dr. Cuto was his mentor. However, I am equally as comfortable taking Buddy to the vet that owns the practice. Dr. Joe graduated from another OSU - Oklahoma State.

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Guest AngelPup

Thanks for all the responses. I think the main thing that bothered me was the fact that she didn't seem to like greyhounds... or maybe she was just a matter-of-fact type. I don't really know her enough to say. I think I'm just used to my previous vet who always seemed happy to see my pup and got down on her level and gave treats. She also took the time to discuss in length what to expect (when I first adopted my previous dog), what to look for, etc., etc. The appointment also seemed a lot more in-depth and she always clipped her nails before we left. This new vet, knowing this was my first greyhound didn't really cover any of the things I thought she would (bloat, heat/cold intolerance, etc.). Plus they seem MUCH more expensive.

 

I have another appointment on Monday for the 2nd Lyme booster and another fecal exam and will go one more time for the 3rd and last booster, but after that I'm trying another vet that is closer to home and was recommended by a fellow-greyhound owner. While I did love my last vet, their office hours aren't convenient for me.

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