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Dog Walking With Weapons

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Guest PiagetsMom

I think I'm going to look into the Halt spray. I don't know if I can purchase it locally, but if not, I know I can order it through Amazon. The problem with any of these things is that you've only got two hands (and especially with Maya, both of mine are pretty busy clicking and treating), and of course, how much reaction time you have in the event of an attack. I've had more than one experience with an "escapee" small dog, and everything happens so fast!

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Guest Clawsandpaws

I agree with GeorgeofNE. I don't carry anything on me when walking the dogs. Thankfully, I live in a neighborhood where everyone seems to respect leash laws or confines their dogs in fenced yards. Yes, I'm lucky. In all the years I have been walking our dogs, I've never felt a threat. Call me what you will, but I prefer not to live my life paranoid about the "what ifs."

I don't. Although she has valid points, I know that I am capable of wielding a weapon and maintaining control of my dog. It is a different situation because I know my dog will not fight back after the first warning growl/snap. Everyone is different with different abilities, even if the weapon ends up being useless in that person's hands, I would have rather tried. I have injured my hands/feet in fights before. I would have much preferred a good ol club of some sort.

 

I do not live my life full of paranoid what ifs... However, I do live my life knowing that it is not a safe place, for dog or human, and I would much rather be prepared. If something you carry gives you piece of mind, then by all means carry it, and then drop it if you think it would do more harm than good in a situation. I don't think there's anything wrong with either mindset, but my personal experiences in life push me to be prepared should I ever need it.

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I carry "something" with me when I walk the dogs, but with the area I live in is slowly being surrounded by some "not so good" areas. I have ran into some shady looking people while walking my dogs so I'm more concerned with protecting myself then worrying about loose dogs. Luckily we've never ran into any in our area, but I guess what I carry could work either way.....

Edited by BellaBean

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The problem with any of these things is that you've only got two hands (and especially with Maya, both of mine are pretty busy clicking and treating), and of course, how much reaction time you have in the event of an attack.

 

That's true... Halt! is on a little clip that you can connect to your leash or your belt loop, which helps matters a little bit.

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We live in a fairly urban environment so I was looking for something that fit the bill against loose dogs and undesirable people. The issue with spray is we always seem to have wind blowing and changing directions. I simply wouldn't have the time to take into account wind direction, where my dog is and all the "what if's" in an attack. I need to be able to just react. I ended picking up a baton that extends to 21" at the flick of a wrist. It would be a last resort measure if my feet can't do the job. I've only had one encounter with a loose dog that wanted a piece of my boy and a swift kick remedied the situation. I HATED doing it but I refuse to let my dog be on the receiving end of an attack. If you do go the spray route, try and find something that sprays a stream and not a mist. The mist goes everywhere in a light wind.

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Guest Adrianne

Yes, I'm lucky. In all the years I have been walking our dogs, I've never felt a threat. Call me what you will, but I prefer not to live my life paranoid about the "what ifs."

 

I used to be the same way, and Chevy paid for that. Call me paranoid now, but I saw how quickly it can happen in a neighborhood in which I've walked my dogs for over ten years.

 

IMG_4375.jpg

 

 

ETA: I know I'm speaking as someone whose dog was just attacked, and my emotions about it are quite raw. But this happened in the blink of an eye without any warning on what was, until that moment, a regular, normal, fun walk for my dogs.

Edited by Adrianne

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I'm not calling anyone anything. Just curious though... do you believe that carrying a spray, etc. would have helped you with something that happened in the blink of an eye? Crap happens. I'm not sure that carrying anything would necessarily help. I probably wouldn't have a chance to react while walking three greys at one time. I certainly would never put down anyone that feels safer carrying something if they believe it could help them.

 

ETA... Sorry if I upset anyone by saying that "I prefer not to live my life paranoid about the "what ifs." I was speaking about myself. I've been called many things including naive, sheltered, etc. I don't own a gun, I don't carry any weapons, etc. Perhaps me or my dogs will be attacked one day, but I'd like to live life thinking the chances of that happening are pretty slim.

 

Hope Chevy makes a full recovery and sorry for what you've been through.

 

 

I used to be the same way, and Chevy paid for that. Call me paranoid now, but I saw how quickly it can happen in a neighborhood in which I've walked my dogs for over ten years.

 

ETA: I know I'm speaking as someone whose dog was just attacked, and my emotions about it are quite raw. But this happened in the blink of an eye without any warning on what was, until that moment, a regular, normal, fun walk for my dogs.

Edited by winnie

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Chevy :kiss2 and Adrianne :bighug

 

I carry a dressage whip similar to this http://www.doversaddlery.com/wonder-whip-mushroom-cap-whip/p/X1-1406/?ids=qpyo1xjahxwq0o45b0bgag55 I've had to use it, and was relieved that I had it with me.

 

Continued prayers for Chevy and his peeps.


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Guest Adrianne

I'm not calling anyone anything. Just curious though... do you believe that carrying a spray, etc. would have helped you with something that happened in the blink of an eye? Crap happens. I'm not sure that carrying anything would necessarily help. I probably wouldn't have a chance to react while walking three greys at one time. I certainly would never put down anyone that feels safer carrying something if they believe it could help them.

 

ETA... Sorry if I upset anyone by saying that "I prefer not to live my life paranoid about the "what ifs." I was speaking about myself. I've been called many things including naive, sheltered, etc. I don't own a gun, I don't carry any weapons, etc. Perhaps me or my dogs will be attacked one day, but I'd like to live life thinking the chances of that happening are pretty slim.

 

Hope Chevy makes a full recovery and sorry for what you've been through.

 

Your words didn't upset me, and I'm not offended, and I didn't think you were calling me paranoid. But the truth is, I am paranoid now. This is something I don't wish on anybody. The worst feeling was the helplessness of watching it all unfold and being able to do absolutely nothing. And yes, I agree that spray would have been totally useless in this situation. But I'm not planning on carrying spray; I'm going to carry something heavy duty that I can swing or deliver a jolt of electricity.

 

My point was, and perhaps I could have worded it better, that I have just taken for granted that me and my dogs were safe on our walks. I've been walking my dogs around this neighborhood for eleven years, and nothing had ever happened. I wasn't on a new route, I didn't do anything out of the ordinary. Through circumstances beyond my control, this happened. And my only weapon was my voice, because I wasn't carrying anything else. These dogs didn't come after me, they came straight for Chevy, and there wasn't a thing I could do about it because I wasn't prepared. Again, that overwhelming feeling of helplessness has changed my way of thinking about this.

 

ETA: I absolutely believe in differences of opinion, and to each his own. I don't think my way is the only way, but it's the way I'm going to go. And thank you for the healing thoughts for Chevy.

 

ETA: One more thing because my brain is scattered this morning. I'm sure me carrying something in the future is going to benefit me as well as my dogs. How can I make them feel comfortable and safe on our walks if I don't feel comfortable and safe on our walks. Unfortunately for me, from here on out, this attack will be in the back of my mind.

Edited by Adrianne

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I have had several encounters with loose dogs, although they are fairly rare in my neighborhood. Luckily, most were more curious than aggressive, and I was able to run them off with shouts and foot stamping. I like the walking stick as it would be a way to fend them off from a bit of a distance. All that being said, the one time there was an actual fight, the other dog slipped through an open gate, charged down the driveway, and the fight was on before I could do anything. I was very lucky that the owner was right there, and we were able to seperate the dogs pretty quickly with no serious injuries. Fletcher is big for a greyhound, and very leash aggressive. He WILL fight. But, he still has that paper thin greyhound skin.

 

I guess what I am saying is, I like having something that could prevent an incident, but if a dog is determined to attack, there probably isn't much I could do to prevent it. Other than carrying a gun and shooting the other dog, which I am not sure I could do.

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Guest FinnsMom

Chevy :kiss2 and Adrianne :bighug

 

I carry a dressage whip similar to this http://www.doversaddlery.com/wonder-whip-mushroom-cap-whip/p/X1-1406/?ids=qpyo1xjahxwq0o45b0bgag55 I've had to use it, and was relieved that I had it with me.

 

Continued prayers for Chevy and his peeps.

 

I like this idea. While we don't have a lot of off leash dogs in the area, we do live by a wooded area that people walk their dogs in and think that the city leash laws are nonexistent once they walk into the trees. They take two steps off the sidewalk and take the leash off and let the dogs go. I think I'd be just as tempted to use the whip on the owner as on any dog that came at Finn.

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With 3 dogs, even hooked onto a 'hands-free' shoulder belt, having a can/bottle of spray would be useless for me.

I used to carry a large stout stick...I'd leave it in the ditch (we're very rural!) and pick it up just before we got to the 'bad dogs' house.... then put it down when we got past there into our 'safe' zone,

Then do the same thing on our way back.

 

The day we were attacked I did not have the stick..we had not seen the dog in a few days and with my heavy winter mittens on, holding 3 leashes + a big stick is not easy.

When he came charging at us I tried to drag the dogs behind me and I just started kicking at his head.

Now I am barely 5' and 110# and this was a beeg out-of-control male Bernese Mountain Dog...but, the adrenaline kicked in and I nailed him in the head quite a few times and he ran off.

The 'only' damage done was a few holes in NIgels heavy weight coat.

 

Thankfully I had my big winter boots on...if it had been summer, he would have easily bitten through a shoe.

 

The dog is no longere there (owners chose to euthanise him :( ) and all the other dogs down that road are very friendly, but I still have large stout sticks placed at various places along the side of the road.

A new dog moved onto the road last fall and I have had to hold a large stick up once or twice to fend him off...even though he 'seems' friendly....


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With 3 dogs, even hooked onto a 'hands-free' shoulder belt, having a can/bottle of spray would be useless for me.

I used to carry a large stout stick...I'd leave it in the ditch (we're very rural!) and pick it up just before we got to the 'bad dogs' house.... then put it down when we got past there into our 'safe' zone,

Then do the same thing on our way back.

 

The day we were attacked I did not have the stick..we had not seen the dog in a few days and with my heavy winter mittens on, holding 3 leashes + a big stick is not easy.

When he came charging at us I tried to drag the dogs behind me and I just started kicking at his head.

Now I am barely 5' and 110# and this was a beeg out-of-control male Bernese Mountain Dog...but, the adrenaline kicked in and I nailed him in the head quite a few times and he ran off.

The 'only' damage done was a few holes in NIgels heavy weight coat.

 

Thankfully I had my big winter boots on...if it had been summer, he would have easily bitten through a shoe.

 

The dog is no longere there (owners chose to euthanise him :( ) and all the other dogs down that road are very friendly, but I still have large stout sticks placed at various places along the side of the road.

A new dog moved onto the road last fall and I have had to hold a large stick up once or twice to fend him off...even though he 'seems' friendly....

You are a good protective greyhound mom. You did the absolute right thing.....they trained me to always remember and act on "kill the head and the body will die." I like Phillipine fighting sticks too. I did have to come down hard on a big ole dog that tried to attack my greyhound Goldie one day (along with another rogue that I hit squarely with a side kick). I hit him right between the ears and it knocked him straight down on the ground and he "recovered" and ran off. Unfortunately in Louisville it was fairly common to be threatened or attacked by loose dogs. This was not the worse incident we had. But it is so bad here that last year a Louisville police dog was even attacked by a loose dog as he and his officer/handler were walking back to their unit. I don't remember what happenned- the police dog wasn't hurt-the officer might have shot the attacker-the Louisville police are known for being trigger happy anyway.

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Pepper spray -

But then again, I'm lucky. Both my husband and I have always taken our dogs out together.

I hold the spray and he has control of our dogs. It's been nice walking all winter here, there's never

many dogs out. Now that the weather is warming up, the dogs are coming out in droves. Just two

last night off leash already. One puppy that ran up to us and was fine. Three blocks down we could

see a Doberman running loose - turned around and immediately walked the other way, hoping it wouldn't

come running after us.

 

If people could only realize what heartache a loose dog can bring....not only to ours all the time, but to theirs

too.

Waaaaay too many idiots in the world for me.

:(

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My dog was attacked by a pit. Three grown adults (me, my husband, and the dog's owner) could not beat that dog hard enough to get her off of my greyhound's neck. There was no way I could have stopped her with my foot, or a bat, or citronella spray, or pepper spray. We now carry a stun gun (legal in California). I will never again listen to my dog screaming and have no way to stop it.


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OK, I came back from our morning walk, and after trying to juggle three dogs and a walking stick (and a poop bag, eventually) I decided I needed another alternative. The only loose dogs we saw were a couple of Chihuahuas that were quickly corralled by their owner and we were far enough away that Fletcher didn't react. I am thinking stun gun. I have been reading reviews, and more than one person has said just the noise has been enough to frighten an aggressive dog and prevent an attack. Plus, if the dog does attack, I can zap him without hurting my dog or myself. I like the idea of a baton (the distance thing again) but don't want an additional alarm. Going to do some more research.

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Guest RMarie

OK, I came back from our morning walk, and after trying to juggle three dogs and a walking stick (and a poop bag, eventually) I decided I needed another alternative. The only loose dogs we saw were a couple of Chihuahuas that were quickly corralled by their owner and we were far enough away that Fletcher didn't react. I am thinking stun gun. I have been reading reviews, and more than one person has said just the noise has been enough to frighten an aggressive dog and prevent an attack. Plus, if the dog does attack, I can zap him without hurting my dog or myself. I like the idea of a baton (the distance thing again) but don't want an additional alarm. Going to do some more research.

 

I, too, am considering a stun gun. But, what if the attacking dog is in contact with my dog...will using the stun gun on that dog hurt my dog?

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Guest Vers

Adrianne, thank you for starting this thread but I'm so sorry for the circumstances that's brought your question here. My hounds have been attacked twice; they were incredibly lucky and had relatively minor injuries because both times they were wearing coats, but the attacks shook me very badly and changed Simba for a long time.

 

In my opinion, to decide what to carry, you need to know what type/temperament of dogs are likely or possible. Many dogs can be dissuaded with a big voice, a big stance or a big stick. Dogs a step more aggressive, pepper spray, bear spray or possibly Halt could work (I don't believe vinegar or citronella can do anything at all if a dog is actually aggressive). Those dogs can also be discouraged with a riding crop, sjambok, walking pole or similar, and if they get too close hitting or kicking them is likely to drive them off.

 

If it's a mildly aggressive to curious dog, I think it was Patricia McConnell? Here it is -- How to Stop an Approaching Dog. I believe the method of spraying treats over an area could stop all but highly aggressive dogs, but then I'm right back to not having a solution to the worst part of the problem.

 

The issue I face is that certain dogs are truly intent on harm and attacks happen unbelievably quickly (we were attacked from behind last time) if you can't discourage the dog before it's made contact. Some dogs will actually become more aggressive if they're kicked, etc. (sorry to call on bully breeds as an example, but I have to -- pain increases their arousal and therefore their aggression). Many accounts have stated nothing will stop an APBT in attack mode but a bullet. I will not carry a gun, and to complicate things further in the winter months the majority of our walks are in the dark.

 

I still haven't found a solution I'm completely comfortable with, but I walk with a stun baton and pepper spray (both legal here, but 70% of the time, the weather/wind/daylight/speed of attack would keep me from using the spray). Sometimes in the dark I also carry a 6 D-cell maglite; it's got some heft -- I'd frankly rather use the stun gun since it's less likely to be lethal. Whenever we can, we walk with friends and their dogs for more protection/deterrence/witnesses.

 

Above all else, I wish to all hells that people would train/leash/contain their dogs with the highest degree of responsibility so this type of harm wouldn't happen to any of us and we could walk in peace.

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Y'all are scaring to me. It's hard to grasp mostly white bread suburban GTers imagining slitting dogs throats.

 

I don't carry anything because as Remalocha said, juggling 3 leashes, poop bags and a weapon would be difficult, much less switching leashes betweeen hands before I could use said weapon. Unlike those of you that could cooly shoot a dog I don't think even if I was gun/concealed weapon trained (which I can't be) I strongly doubt that I could shoot accurately into a group of fighting dogs and be sure to miss mine. By the time the dogs are engaged it's too late for pepper spray...and like Adrianne said it happens in the blink of an eye. If the pack attack on Poodle had been outside the dog park and I had a stun gun I'd still have been trying to stun five different dogs and miss him as they all writhed and twisted. You guys have stronger nerves than me. In Adriannes case as well as Poodles they were freak cases that happened so fast not much would have helped.

 

My neighbors ride bikes and while I don't remember what store they went to the salesperson asked what kind of dogs they were having trouble with. They said "dobermans" and he sold them some Halt but cautioned it would not work on mad as hell pit bulls, and sometimes mad as hell dogs of other breeds.

 

In general the best defense for me is a strong offense. I lived and walked home and to my car in the early morning hours in downtown Chicago long enough to have "get the big picture" ingrained in me. Keep an eye out ahead, on each side and even behind you. You can avoid a lot (but not all) problems by paying attention. Something is off ahead cross the street or turn back, read dog body language Thankfully we don't have that many loose dogs (ummm..except for the german shepherds that followed us home, the pom on my porch, my neighbors dogs that used to come here in storms, the setter that was one of the sires of Lassie's puppies two doors down, the black pit bull that stayed here quite a while, and...) or creepy people around here - and I live in the not so great part of town. Poodle was AWOL and a loose dog for about 5-10 minutes yesterday. My neighbors corralled him but I'd hate to think of a greyhound owner using a stun gun of him if he'd barrelled up to their dog because it reminded him of his greyhound brothers.


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Guest Vers

Pam, you are absolutely correct that most self-defense tools aren't all much help once a fight has started, and that an aware offensive is a better bet than any defense. I've walked a mile out of my way many times to avoid certain owners and their dogs and always try to have another route or turn to take wherever we walk. That said, there's no harm in waving a stick and shouting, and if the worst case does happen, at least I have something to aid in the defense of my hounds that's better than my bare hands.

 

Poodle's safe; we're not talking about friendly off-leash dogs here who you can either shout down or tell by body language that they really mean no harm.

 

Me, I'm trying to keep my dogs safe in case we are attacked a third time. I won't go so far as to say by any means necessary, but if you know how much I love my dogs, you know I can be a mean and proper Mama Bear about keeping them unharmed.

Edited by Vers

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I want to prevent trouble if at all possible, so I like the idea that the sound of a stun gun will scare an aggressive dog off. If the worst happens and a fight actually starts, it seems like the best way to break it up with minimal damage. There are no guarantees, I know that.

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An air horn would probably work for a lot of dogs. Dog hearing is so much better than ours, and obnoxious loud noise like an air horn would probably make most run away (I know it would me!) Apparently, though, there is something about the "electrical" sound a stun gun makes that is particularly effective. It would be a lot harder to use with multiple dogs, I have only ever had to deal with one loose dog at a time. I just don't know...

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