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Guest alafair

New Adopted Retired Racer Boy Keeps Peeing In The House

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Guest alafair

We just adopted 2 greyhounds a boy and girl; Jack and Gia and Jack keeps peeing on my furniture and luckily I have Ikea washable slip covers and hard wood floors but this is so annoying I have a doggie door to the garage lined with potty pads which he will use but will still go on my furniture. I dont know what to do either. They say you have to catch them in the act and startle them and immediatly take them where you want them to go but I never catch him in the act. I need a solution.

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Do you crate him when you're not home? Do you take them outside? Attach him to you and if he shows any signs of needing to go out, bring him out. Signs include pacing, circling, sniffing intently. If you can't watch him, crate him.

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First, I wouldn't teach him to go in the garage, even on potty pads. He needs to understand that outside is the place to pee, and I'd imagine giving him an indoor option is really confusing him. Second, it sounds like you're giving him too much access way too soon. Until he's fully housetrained (meaning no accidents at all in a month or more), he needs to be in your sight at all times. That may mean you need to attach him to you with a long leash at first. If you watch him carefully you can also just block him into whatever room you're in with x-pens and/or baby gates. Take him out often at first (every few hours) and give lots of praise for peeing outside. When you're not home, either crate him or use the baby gate to block him into a small (hopefully easily cleanable) space. Also, make sure you're cleaning up the pee with an enzyme cleaner like Nature's Miracle. Otherwise, he'll still be able to smell it and he'll keep going back to the same spots.


Valerie w/ Cash (CashforClunkers) & Lucy (Racing School Dropout)
Missing our gorgeous Miss
Diamond (Shorty's Diamond), sweet boy Gabe (Zared) and Holly (ByGollyItsHolly), who never made it home.

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Guest TheModernMutt

He needs to understand that outside is the place to pee, and I'd imagine giving him an indoor option is really confusing him.

 

 

 

This. A hard surface is a hard surface, pee pad or not. If he is a retired racer, he should have a pretty good idea of what "outside" feels like whether it be grass or sand. If you aren't allowing him access to an outside area, he is confused and peeing wherever he needs to. I'm sure he is holding it as long as he possibly can poor thing.

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Guest karilynn

I agree with the advice that has been given. When I read "pees in the garage" I immediately knew that was the issue. A garage may be a OK place for him to pee in your eyes, but he's a dog, he can't tell the difference between a garage and the inside of your house. People place high expectations on their dogs sometimes and it always ends in disappointment, especially disappointment in the dog who doesn't know any better, which I find sad. Also, he's new to you and he's been given way too much freedom if you can't catch him in the act. If you're going to teach him housebreaking 101, he needs a confined space when you are not able to supervise him, like a crate or an x-pen. He needs to be let out often at first, on a schedule. And then back in the confined area if you're leaving or unable to supervise. Dogs really are intelligent, but you're expecting this dog to know things that a dog simply cannot know and you're annoyed by the fact that he isn't getting it. He wont get it until you provide him more structure and help him understand what is expected of him in a way that is reasonable and realistic. A dog is only ever as successful as you set him up to be. It's a lesson I had to learn the hard way.

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Guest alafair

They are walked 2 to 3 times a day and taken outside before bed to potty. The reason for the garage/potty pads is I wanted them to have an a alternate place to go if they need it but if you all think that is a bad idea I guess I shouldnt have that. I cant crate them, I feel it is cruel. I do baby gate off parts of the house and have old towels and blankets draped where he might lift his leg. I am using an enzymatic spray cleaner for urine.

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Guest TheModernMutt

Crate training isn't cruel, you should really research it and make yourself familiar with the process. If your greyhound is a retired racer, he is more than comfortable in a crate.

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They say you have to catch them in the act and startle them and immediatly take them where you want them to go but I never catch him in the act.

 

As others have mentioned, this is the main problem. To housetrain a dog, you need to prevent accidents, supervise closely enough that the dog never has a chance to potty inside without being corrected, and reward the dog every time he uses the bathroom outside. The more consistent you are about accomplishing those key points, the faster the dog will learn.

 

Obviously none of us are perfect, and you might miss the occasional accident, but if your dog is having a lot of accidents and you never catch him in the act, you're giving your dog way too much freedom and not nearly enough supervision. Every time he pees in the house without being seen and corrected, he's learning that it's ok to to relieve himself inside.

 

A crate is probably the best tool to help housetrain a dog. You're the one who believes it's cruel, not your dog. But if you absolutely refuse to use a crate, you should still gate him into a smaller area whenever you can't supervise. But unless that area is as small as a crate, expect that he will probably have accidents in there. And he'll probably continue to potty there when he needs to go and you're not around to see the signs and let him outside.

 

I'd suggest trips outside to potty at least 4-5 times a day, and make sure he actually pees each time. With a boy, you may even need to make sure he pees 3-4 times before going back inside if he's a marker.


Jennifer &

Willow (Wilma Waggle), Wiki (Wiki Hard Ten), Carter (Let's Get It On),

Ollie (whippet), Gracie (whippet x), & Terra (whippet) + Just Saying + Just Alice

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They are walked 2 to 3 times a day and taken outside before bed to potty. The reason for the garage/potty pads is I wanted them to have an a alternate place to go if they need it but if you all think that is a bad idea I guess I shouldnt have that. I cant crate them, I feel it is cruel. I do baby gate off parts of the house and have old towels and blankets draped where he might lift his leg. I am using an enzymatic spray cleaner for urine.

 

It actually is a safe alternative, not cruel at all. My female LOVES to be crated but since she is completely trustworthy I don't have any crates up...but I've had her for 5 years. I tried crating my current foster and he has SA, so it was not an option for him...however, he doesn't pee on furniture when I'm gone.

 

Crating makes it so you don't have to worry about them eating anything...I didn't think my boy Pop would shortly after we got him, so we left him out of the crate and came home to him having eaten an entire bottle of fish treats. Just make sure you take their collar off before putting them in a crate.

 

Besides, you won't be cleaning up a mess from your couch...and leashing him to you until he learns is another good idea.


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Marble, Noah, Eden, Raya (red heeler), Cooper & Trooper (naughty kittens)

Missing my bridge angels: Pop, Zelda, Mousey & Carmel

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Crating is not cruel. Getting frustrated with a dog who has NO CLUE what you want of him (which far too often leads to the dog being returned--I'm not saying you suggested that, but trust me. Stick around for a while...) is far worse.

 

You do understand Greyhounds are not housebroken, right?? They're either in their crates, or in a turn out yard. They don't soil in their crate (normally) because a dog's instinct is to not do that. They're let out on regular intervals. They go then. Given free run of a house, with no idea that you are against urinating in it, is sort of like expecting a baby to understand how to use a toilet.

 

You need to treat him as if he's a puppy. You need to supervise him at all times inside until he learns how to ask to go out. Twice a day is NOT enough. If he were old, ill, or otherwise, I'd think the garage was a pretty good idea (assuming you cannot have a dog door to the yard?) AFTER he understands that the entire house is his new "den."

 

I'd suggest you be in touch TODAY with your adoption group. Also read some books on retired racers. And could someone post that wonderful piece about why everything in this dog's life is confusing right now?



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Susan,  Hamish,  Mister Bigglesworth and Nikita Stanislav. Missing Ming, George, and Buck

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You didn't say if he was neutered or not. He's marking. I use a belly band when my fosters are not near me or I crate if I can't correct their marking behavior.


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Kari and the pups.
Run free sweet Hana 9/21/08-9/12/10. Missing Sparks with every breath.
Passion 10/16/02-5/25/17

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First, I wouldn't teach him to go in the garage, even on potty pads. He needs to understand that outside is the place to pee, and I'd imagine giving him an indoor option is really confusing him. Second, it sounds like you're giving him too much access way too soon. Until he's fully housetrained (meaning no accidents at all in a month or more), he needs to be in your sight at all times. That may mean you need to attach him to you with a long leash at first. If you watch him carefully you can also just block him into whatever room you're in with x-pens and/or baby gates. Take him out often at first (every few hours) and give lots of praise for peeing outside. When you're not home, either crate him or use the baby gate to block him into a small (hopefully easily cleanable) space. Also, make sure you're cleaning up the pee with an enzyme cleaner like Nature's Miracle. Otherwise, he'll still be able to smell it and he'll keep going back to the same spots.

 

 

This. A hard surface is a hard surface, pee pad or not. If he is a retired racer, he should have a pretty good idea of what "outside" feels like whether it be grass or sand. If you aren't allowing him access to an outside area, he is confused and peeing wherever he needs to. I'm sure he is holding it as long as he possibly can poor thing.

Ditto. He probably jsut needs access to the outside.

Crating is not cruel. The overwhelming majority don't mind; a lot of them like it(it is "home" to them; and some love the sense of security it gives them.

Edited by racindog

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We just adopted 2 greyhounds a boy and girl; Jack and Gia and Jack keeps peeing on my furniture and luckily I have Ikea washable slip covers and hard wood floors but this is so annoying I have a doggie door to the garage lined with potty pads which he will use but will still go on my furniture. I dont know what to do either. They say you have to catch them in the act and startle them and immediatly take them where you want them to go but I never catch him in the act. I need a solution.

if it's a small amount, he may be marking. btw, I don't use crates...a lot have responsed pro-crate, but I just wanted to add that I'm a non-crater and it's ok to feel how you do about not crating. However, greys are kept in large kennels at the track so it's not cruel. They eat and sleep in them and don't have to share, although I've seen pics with humans in them with the grey. I'm ok with crates for security reasons or for those who love their crate if the door is kept open so they can in and out.

 

I'd tether him to you when at home, and use x-pens or baby gates if you can block off an area with a dog pillow and water where he won't damage carpets until you this resolved.


Jan with precious pups Katie Crazykatiebug, Emmy (Stormin J Flag) and Simon (Nitro Si) Missing my angels: Bailey Buffetbobleclair 11/11/98-17/12/09; Ben Task Rapid Wave 5/5/02-2/11/15; and Brooke Glo's Destroyer 7/09/06-21/06/16. My blog about grief The reality is that you will grieve forever. You will not get over the loss of a loved one; you will learn to live with it. You will heal and you will rebuild yourself around the loss you have suffered. You will be whole again but you will never be the same. Nor should you be the same, nor would you want to. Elisabeth Kübler-Ross

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Crating is not cruel! I agree with everyone else- greyhounds do not come housebroken. You have to teach them where to go and when. If you prefer not to crate, that's fine. But your guy needs a structured food-water-elimination schedule and some type of housebreaking method. If not a crate, then confinement or umbilical method. He cannot be out of your sight in the house. Period.

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Guest Frannie

I'm about to bring home a darling boy on Saturday, who also is not housebroken. he will be my seventh greyhound since 1993. When my previous six were new, I lived in a very small first-floor apartment steps away from my job, and I could watch each of them like a hawk and come home frequently. Now there's a bus ride between home and work, and my apartment is big and on two floors. I have a baby gate (and I'm considering adding a few more), and a beautiful big new crate that's furnished with soft bedding and toys. After spending several days home from work umbilical-corded to my new boy, I will be coming home at lunch and possibly supplementing my midday walk with a dog walker. (It's going to get expensive, but greyhounds are my one luxury in life.)

 

Please don't think of the crate as cruel. (As long as the dog can stand up and turn around, it's a lot like what their ancestors know as a safe place.) Sure, it can be misused. No dog should ever be left in one for countless hours. (unless he shows me that I need to reconsider, I feel OK about keeping Yurtiedog crated for the morning and afternoon four hour stretches when I'm out of the house at work; when I'm home he will be outside frequently enough that it will be OK to have him outside the crate in view of me.)

 

 

I hope this works out for both of us. Crating done right is kind. Returning a dog to an adoption kennel unnecessarily (and there are times when this must happen) after he has bonded with you is much, much harder on him.

 

Frannie

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Guest alafair

Things are going better and although Jack will lift his leg very rarely in the house it has been Gia that is the pee culprit but that said I think she has urinary tract issues; I think she has perivulvar dermatitis, and this is a result of shooting up anabolic steroids to female greyhound race dogs. The purpose of shooting up dogs is to prevent the females from going into season. When females go into season, they cannot race. If they cannot race, they cannot make money. Female dogs go into season (heat) two times a year for three weeks. After steroid injections, some female greyhounds suffer from perivulvar dermatitis, a painful chronic skin condition also known as vulvar fold dermatitis or crotch rot. The condition is difficult to resolve unless done surgically. Sometimes the condition requires a lifetime of management. Also, long-term use of anabolic steroids in dogs is known to cause urine scald, urinary tract infections, urine incontinence, and genital abnormalities. (Copied and pasted from an article) has anyone heard of this? Any idea approx cost of surgery to fix?

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it has been Gia that is the pee culprit but that said I think she has urinary tract issues; I think she has perivulvar dermatitis...... has anyone heard of this? Any idea approx cost of surgery to fix?

 

You'll get more responses to this if you start a separate topic under Health & Medical.

 

While there are some sources that attribute perivulvar dermatitis in greyhounds to the testosterone injections they get to keep them from coming out of heat, I don't believe it's been shown to be a direct correlation. For me, it doesn't make sense. Every single female retired racing greyhound got those injections, and if the testosterone directly caused this problem, or even predisposed to it, I'd expect to see a lot more cases of it. But persistent urinary tract infections and perivulvar dermatitis are really not that common in greyhounds. We see the same problems in a small percentage of other breeds too, usually due to genetics, anatomic development, obesity, and possibly early spay.

 

Was that article written by a vet, or someone with medical knowledge? Here's an article from the OSU Greyhound Health and Wellness program about the condition:

https://ckm.osu.edu/sitetool/sites/greyhoundpublic/documents/About/Newsletters/11-ghwpNewsletterAutumnChronicUTIs%281%29.pdf


Jennifer &

Willow (Wilma Waggle), Wiki (Wiki Hard Ten), Carter (Let's Get It On),

Ollie (whippet), Gracie (whippet x), & Terra (whippet) + Just Saying + Just Alice

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