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Guest LittleGreys
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Guest LittleGreys

I have a 9 year old girl who has CUPS (chronic ulcerative paradental stomatitis). She needs a whole mouth extraction. Even as a vet tech, the thought of it sends shivers down my spine. Most of her remaining teeth (she has had many dentals over the years, but still has most of her teeth) are in there very solid, no loose ones, so the extractions are not going to be easy. But it has to be done, she is in a lot of pain, and the smell is nauseating.

Has anyone dealt with this, and how was the recovery? I've never had to deal with it with one of my personal dogs before.

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Guest snoopycomehome

Our 5yo Gypsy has CUPS, but she has all her teeth still. My husband brushes them almost daily and I use a dental tool to scrape off the crunchies every few weeks. It is pretty stinky at times! :sick She's getting a dental on Tuesday. We also give her azathioprine every day, which helps keep her gum swelling down and allows her to eat. Does yours take medication?

 

So sorry to hear about the extractions...poor girl! Hopefully she will do better with them gone, though. Let us know how she does!

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Yikes-full mouth extractions will be tough esp because they are healthy teeth :-(. Have you or your vet consulted with a veterinary dentist? Not knowing how equipped your clinic is--if you do proceed with the oral surgery I wonder if you should have her admitted to a 24 hour care facility where she can receive overnight care (pain management-CRI). I have seen some ghs develop heart arrhythmias from severe pain (my boy included after his elap) where only injectable opiates like hydromorphone helped.

I would be curious to see if immune suppressants could control the disease (sadly I know you are familiar with those meds).

Update if you can.

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Guest LittleGreys

We did both pred and azathioprine with no luck. We do use the CRI for pain management frequently at my clinic. And also the injectable opiates. I don't know what other options we would have, the ulcers are very severe and now she has started crying out in pain. She eats, but not well. I feel so bad for her. But I dread the extractions.

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I second the vote for a board certified dental surgeon at a 24h facility. We've never faced the kind of work you are having done, but still, the quality of the work was superb and the recovery went so, so smoothly. Specialized equipment, and a mountain of experience since this is all they do, plus someone monitoring them and able to adjust meds 24h per day was a huge, huge comfort to me, not to mention the hound! Good luck with this - I hope your girl does well and gets the relief she needs once she is all healed up.

 

ETA, given the magnitude of the procedure being considered it wouldn't hurt to have at least a consult with a good dental surgeon as well, if only for your own peace of mind.

Edited by Rickiesmom
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Not sure if you're planning to have your regular vet do the procedure, or if you were already planning to go to a veterinary dentist, but I would also advise going to the dentist. It will be more expensive, but always a good idea to take x-rays before extracting well-attached teeth to make sure there are no surprises like abnormal/twisted roots. And a dental specialist will be much faster and more efficient at extractions. Not a big deal with a standard dental where you might be extracting multiple loose teeth and a couple well-rooted ones. But when doing a full-mouth extraction where most of the teeth are solid, this can made a huge difference in the total time under anesthesia.

Jennifer &

Willow (Wilma Waggle), Wiki (Wiki Hard Ten), Carter (Let's Get It On),

Ollie (whippet), Gracie (whippet x), & Terra (whippet) + Just Saying + Just Alice

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