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Vet Wants To Do An Echo


Guest Liz
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Our girl Chauncey is nine and is scheduled for a dental, when we called to set up the appt. the vet stated that it would be a good idea for Chauncey to have an echo done along with her blood work before the dental. She told us Chauncey has a heart murmur which she has had since we got her at age three. They are not insisting that she have the echo they just thought it would be a good idea. What would you do. She has no issues. She is healthy, the heart murmur has never slowed her down, if in fact she has one. She had a dental when she was three and has not needed another until now. Since her last dental lasted so long I expect this to be her final dental. I don't want to risk her health but DH is off work right now and my salary was cut in half so money is tight. If everyone thinks it is the right thing to do we will figure something out. Thanks

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That is how we found out about my Molly's heart condition! At least this way they will be able to give the correct anesthesia without problems. My vet consulted the cardiologist over the phone and sent her the echo before doing the teeth. Then after that we made an appointment to the vet hospital to visit the cardiologist for a diagnosis.

 

If money is tight, I would wait on the teeth! But at least get the echo done, to help diagnose if there is a real problem.

Edited by mld
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Rainy is 8 and had always had a heart murmur. Vet advised to go get an echo, but I opted against it. It won't change our daily care right now and I would rather save the money for when it's really needed.

 

But we also don't have a dental in our future... That might make me reevaluate. Whatever you decide it doesn't make you a bad mommy to factor finances into the decision. That's just being realistic.

Edited by JAJ2010

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Jessica

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If her teeth aren't too bad, you might see if you can clear them up with a few weeks of brushing with Petzlife. I've been absolutely amazed by the stuff. After the first few weeks of using the gel and spray, the plaque was coming off my dogs' teeth in big chunks.

Valerie w/ Cash (CashforClunkers) & Lucy (Racing School Dropout)
Missing our gorgeous Miss
Diamond (Shorty's Diamond), sweet boy Gabe (Zared) and Holly (ByGollyItsHolly), who never made it home.

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I agree with vjgrey.If the teeth aren't too bad, you can scrape the tarter off yourself with a scaler that you can get from a pet supply store, and if you brush your dog's teeth and use an anti tarter spray several times a week she won't need dentals anymore.I've always taken care of my own dogs teeth so They wouldn't need to get dentals and my vet always tells me they look fantastic. It's really not hard to do, just a few minutes 3 or 4 times a week, once you get the hang of it. My dogs have always been very cooperative with it.

 

Also, if the vet is concerned with bacterial endocarditis, can't the dog be given a prophylactic dose of antibiotic before the dental?That's what I have to do before dentals because I have a heart murmur.

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Having the echo done is the best way to evaluate heart function. Without the echo, you don't know the cause or significance of the heart murmur and whether there is any early heart disease that could cause complications with the anesthesia.

 

Poodle has had a grade 3 murmer for years and came through a dental last month just fine at the age of around 14. We did senior bloodwork, extra fluids, etc.

 

Actually, "extra fluids" is the last thing that should be done for a dog with an undiagnosed heart murmur or known heart disease. Fluids can overload the heart and push the dog into congestive heart failure. Most of the time when I've anesthetized a heart patient, one of the main recommendations I get from the specialist is to go light on the IV fluids.

 

I agree with vjgrey.If the teeth aren't too bad, you can scrape the tarter off yourself with a scaler that you can get from a pet supply store, and if you brush your dog's teeth and use an anti tarter spray several times a week she won't need dentals anymore.

 

Without knowing the current state of the dog's teeth and gums, I'd be hesitant to make any recommendations like this. I know you qualified this with "if the teeth aren't too bad" but that's not necessarily an assessment that can be easily made - often we don't know how bad the teeth are until after the dog is under anesthesia, the tartar removed, and all teeth surfaces closely evaluated. Scaling only effectively addresses periodontal disease if buildup under the gumline is thoroughly removed, which is essentially impossible in most awake dogs. And if there is already significant dental disease, especially loose teeth or exposed pulp cavity or roots, trying to clean the teeth without anesthesia can be extremely painful and cause more harm than good.

Jennifer &

Willow (Wilma Waggle), Wiki (Wiki Hard Ten), Carter (Let's Get It On),

Ollie (whippet), Gracie (whippet x), & Terra (whippet) + Just Saying + Just Alice

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