Jump to content

Neurectomy For Corns


Guest GreyKatie
 Share

Recommended Posts

Guest GreyKatie

I searched and only found one post mentioning this.

 

Has anyone had this done? I have Nite (Darcass the Nite). He presented a year ago with 5 corns, affecting all four feet. He is down to two completely intractable corns: one on each front foot. Hulling provides absolutely no relief, unfortunately. We've been doing Murray Ave. Apothecary creams twice a day for a year, booties, almost zero activity, frequent hulling, etc. He is miserable.

 

He saw Dr. Kellogg at OSU last month for a dental (she could not be more wonderful, btw). She recommended seeing Orthopedics (Dr. Dyce) to evaluate him for neurectomy. I am so upset about this; I want to make these damned things go away; I don't want to take away feeling to his toes! But if this will work, and it's the only solution, we need to do it.

 

Anyone have any experience? Advice, thoughts, anything? Our poor Nite used to walk miles with me, and now he hobbles even moving around the house. I need to fix him before it's too late.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi there, I'm sorry for the situation you are in! We have had two greys with corns. Each had only one foot involved. Both had the corn surgically removed and have been walking on all fours since that time. I heard nothing about neurectomy I doubt that was done. So far neither has come back (one was 5 years ago, one was this past February). I hope you can get some relief for Nite!

Tin and Michael and Lucas, Picasso, Hero, Oasis, Galina, Neizan, Enzo, Salvo and Noor the Galgos.
Remembering Bridge Angel Greyhounds: Tosca, Jamey, Master, Diego, and Ambi; plus Angel Galgos Jules, Marco and Baltasar.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

He didn't do a neurectomy, but my vet recently did a temporary nerve block on Nadir's toe to determine if a suspect corn was the reason for him holding up and not wanting to put weight on one leg. As soon as the toe was numbed he was back to standing on that leg again and walking without a limp.

How were the other corns eliminated? Have you tried surgical removal of these 2 corns? I'm not referring to hulling, but removing the whole corn. I know there are always chances they will return, but this is lessened if wide enough margins are taken when removing. Nadir had a corn removed from a weight bearing rear toe about 2 years ago and none have come back up on that toe. My plan is to have this new corn also surgically removed. I am, however, interested in the neurectomy procedure though and will definitely follow this thread in hopes that others may have more information, pros and cons, of this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another corn dog owner here - I know exactly how you feel. My Conor has had all 4 of his corns (one on each foot) removed surgically (not neurectomys). His front ones have not come back & he recently had his rear ones done. He could.not.walk before the surgeries. I had no choice. The front ones were done by someone who used to do a lot of them & we broke in a new vet for the rears (she's an excellent surgeon, so while she had some reservations, I did not :lol ). I would want to try just cutting them out (either conventionally or with a laser) before messing with the nerves. Since you're near OSU, I wouldn't have any hesitation with letting Dr. Dyce's team try a simple procedure first. All my sympathies for you & Nite.

gallery_7491_3326_2049.jpg

Deirdre with Conor (Daring Pocobueno), Keeva (Kiowa Mimi Mona), & kittehs Gemma & robthomas.

Our beloved angels Faolin & Liath, & kittehs Mona & Caesar. Remembering Bobby, Doc McCoy, & Chip McGrath.

"He feeds you, pets you, adores you, collects your poop in a bag. There's only one explanation: you are a hairy little god." Nick Galifinakis

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest DeniseL

Hi there! So sorry for your boy's corn. They are truely evil. My baby boy has 3 infected feet. We did surgical removal with laser on 3 corns 3 months ago. With in two months, two of the three had come back with a vengence, so I understand your frustration. Luckly, we have settled into a routine of hulling that seems to be working for him. The other thing that was recommended to us by the vets at NGAP is amputation of the toe as a possible option. We are nowhere near making that decision and since he has multiple corns, I am not sure it would even be feasable. It would have to be an absolute last resort. The neurctomy sounds like an interesting option and I will follow this thread to see if anyone has any experience. I guess with my pup, I would just want to make sure I tried all other possible solutions before I made and irreversable decsion like amputation or nerve surgery. Have you tried laser removal? Although, it wasn't very succesful for us, I know some hounds get relief from it...I am lucky that Miami doesn't seem to be too inhibited or in too much pain by his corns right now, thank god.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

No experience, but I'm hoping someone chimes in. I did see a vetmed paper a couple of years ago that compared surgery outcomes for corns in greyhounds, and found that a little over half of the surgeries resulted in "permanent" removal of the corn. (the dogs were still alive, so "permanent" is relative)

 

But that means more than 45% of them came back. Plus, there's that healing time after surgery.

 

Does anyone know the healing downtime for neurectomy? Or the potential side effects (besides loss of feeling)? I'd think an active hound would be more apt to sprain, tear, or even fracture the toe while running or spinning, just like an athlete who's lost feeling in a toe or foot. But, if the healing downtime is less than it is with corn surgery (I've heard it's long and painful?), we might be tempted to try neurectomy on the worst toe.

 

We're in the same boat you are -- a year of hulling, dremeling, creams, duct tape, corn removers, and boots, and three corns on the two front paws remain intractable (four others disappeared for roughly 3-4 months after hulling, then returned; I just hulled them again two weeks ago and they seem to be "gone" again).

 

Boots don't help, and hulling/dremeling doesn't even give 24 hours of relief on Kipper's front paws. If we didn't live by a nice soft beach, he'd probably never walk further than half a block. Very sad for a lively, coordinated little hound who lives for the days his paws feel good enough to catch his tennis ball in the air.

gallery_17468_3098_7486.jpg
Dash (Mega Batboy), & forever missing Kipper (RD's Kiper, 2006-2015) & Souldog Dune (Pazzo Otis, 1994-2008)
"..cherish him and give him place with yourself for the rest of his but too short life. It is his one drawback. He should live as long as his owner."
James Matheson, The Greyhound: Breeding, Coursing, Racing, etc., 1929

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know anything from experience, but I would be concerned about them not feeling anything if they should step on something and perhaps cut their foot / toe. I know people with no feeling in feet or other places are cautioned about accidently burning or cutting themselves.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest GreyKatie

June, I've had the same thought.

 

We have Nite at the vet today. Dr. Dyce has so far diagnosed:

 

- arthritis in forelimbs

- complex foot anatomy (don't know what this means yet)

- sisemoid disease

- carpal hyperextension

 

He says amputation is not a viable option. Nite is having x-rays right now and we will meet with Dr. Dyce again at 2:30 to discuss his findings.

 

Dr. Kellogg told us she's had good results with amputation, but that doesn't seem like a good idea since it's on the middle toes of both feet.

 

I've read that the rate of recidivism is very high after surgical removal of corns, so that hadn't seemed like a good option. I really would like to try anything before doing something as permanent as a neurectomy.

 

4My2Greys, the other corns just sort of went away. We did Murray Ave creams and such, and that seems to have done the trick. These two though are just impossible. We're at almost a year now and the dog can barely walk. It's so depressing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest GreyKatie

tbhounds, I think you did. He's an enormous black boy (92 pounds and very solid). He licked a raw spot on his shoulder and it took forever to clear up (over a month). Fortunately, he's a blood donor, and they fixed him all up at no charge to us. We love OSU :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

tbhounds, I think you did. He's an enormous black boy (92 pounds and very solid). He licked a raw spot on his shoulder and it took forever to clear up (over a month). Fortunately, he's a blood donor, and they fixed him all up at no charge to us. We love OSU :)

Ya yes! I did meet him :-)

Keep us posted ok?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest GreyKatie

Nite was diagnosed today with arthritis, sesamoiditis, and corns (duh). We got some antiviral cream for his corns (no idea why this wasn't suggested a year ago when this first started, but whatever) that we will do for 10 days. After that, if he isn't better, we will do surgical removal of corns. If they come back after that, we will look into neurectomy. Dr. Dyce isn't thrilled about the idea of neurectomy (neither are we!). He says that they know which nerves to cut, but that others could grow in unexpected ways. It's not 100% certain to work, and there's a chance it could go wrong.

 

So, wish us luck, I guess. Hoping the antivirals help, but definitely not optimistic.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll be having Nadir's teeth cleaned and his corn surgically removed on the 18th of December . While I'm waiting I think I'll give the antiviral cream a try too. I figure it can't hurt. Which antiviral cream are you using?

I think that since Nite's other corns went away on their own there's a really good chance that if you do end up resorting to surgical removal it won't come back. I hope the cream works for you though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest DeniseL

Thera paws have been a lifesaver for or boy, don't know what we would have done without them. We are also having a good response to oral chinese herbs...miami is down to just one small corn now, he started with 5 :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Aldara?

 

Does that require a prescription?

 

Thera paws have been a lifesaver for or boy, don't know what we would have done without them. We are also having a good response to oral chinese herbs...miami is down to just one small corn now, he started with 5 :)

 

Which herbs or herbal blend is he on?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest grey_dreams

Thera paws have been a lifesaver for or boy, don't know what we would have done without them. We are also having a good response to oral chinese herbs...miami is down to just one small corn now, he started with 5 :)

 

That's great news! What chinese herb are you using, and at what dosage?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Aldara?

 

Does that require a prescription?

 

Thera paws have been a lifesaver for or boy, don't know what we would have done without them. We are also having a good response to oral chinese herbs...miami is down to just one small corn now, he started with 5 :)

 

Which herbs or herbal blend is he on?

Yes, you need a script for Aldara.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest GreyKatie

Nite is on Aldara. It's four treatments, every other night, all night. We've been using Therapaws...they don't help much :( Dr. Kellogg initially became concerned about his corns when she noticed how he was walking. It was so unusual that she took a video of his gait. He sort of leans back on his front feet, so they're flat, rather than up on his toes like he should. She inititally told us he could be causing lasting damage by doing this, and suggested he might need surgery for carpal hyperextension (a google image search will show you how these dogs walk with flat feet). Fortunately, Dr. Dyce doesn't think this is the case.

 

So the plan now is to try Aldara (it was $100 for the four doses...omg). Keep his nails short (they have a tendency to get very long, and Dr. Dyce said that when they're long, they act as a lever to flatten his feet). If things haven't improved by Friday, November 30 (his next appointment), we will schedule surgery to remove the corns. I'm not thrilled about this, but I can't see another year of his life wasted trying ointments and things that aren't working. The dog hasn't been out for a walk since February :(

 

Good luck to everyone dealing with corns. They are such a little thing, but they cause so much trouble.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Remy had corn removal surgery. Within 6 months, the corn came back. Nothing will make these evil corns go away, short of toe amputation. But you can't amputate when so many toes are affected. My heart goes out to you and your pup. It is just AWFUL to not be able to enjoy walks with him.

Image removed, not within Signature Guidelines.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Remy had corn removal surgery. Within 6 months, the corn came back. Nothing will make these evil corns go away, short of toe amputation. But you can't amputate when so many toes are affected. My heart goes out to you and your pup. It is just AWFUL to not be able to enjoy walks with him.

Respectfully disagree--i have seen successful corn surgeries.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest DeniseL

Thera paws have been a lifesaver for or boy, don't know what we would have done without them. We are also having a good response to oral chinese herbs...miami is down to just one small corn now, he started with 5 :)

 

That's great news! What chinese herb are you using, and at what dosage?

 

He is taking Kan Herb Company, Kan Essentails, Blood's Palace, 2 in the morning, 2 at night. He has been taking them for about 2 months. They were recommended by Dr. Steven Marsden for Miami based on his temperment, so I am not sure if the type of herb combination would differ for your particular corndog....my boy is ultra sensitive and a bit nervous. My vet works a lot with homeopathics and such so she orders them for me. I wasn't familiar with Dr. Marsden before, but I know she hold him in a very high regard...but here is the web site:

 

http://www.kanherb.com/cons_pi_essentials.asp

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...