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Predator Calls


Guest Clawsandpaws
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Guest Clawsandpaws

So at my rescue today I bought a predator call thingy. I guess it's also called a squawker sometimes? Well, the good news is, Dudley is OBSESSED with the noise, I bumped the packaging and it squawked and he has been staring at me intensely for about 30 minutes now.

 

The question is...

 

What do I do with is? Lol, just use it in an open area (enclosed of course) and let him run at me? I bought it in excitement, didn't ask about practical usage!

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Practical usage is: God forbid he ever gets out, he'll come towards someone who is squawking. Mine are all squawker trained just for that reason. We practice every few weeks, and they get an extra-special treat when they come to me---usually something people-food, since they don't get any as a rule. Like 1/3 of a peanut butter sandwich, or a big hunk of chicken, or some big pizza bones. I have one at each of my doors, and one in the car. I wait until everyone is doing their thing in the yard, then squawk, and they all come aflyin' in!

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Guest Clawsandpaws

Practical usage is: God forbid he ever gets out, he'll come towards someone who is squawking. Mine are all squawker trained just for that reason. We practice every few weeks, and they get an extra-special treat when they come to me---usually something people-food, since they don't get any as a rule. Like 1/3 of a peanut butter sandwich, or a big hunk of chicken, or some big pizza bones. I have one at each of my doors, and one in the car. I wait until everyone is doing their thing in the yard, then squawk, and they all come aflyin' in!

 

Haha, yea, I used it on accident inside the office at the kennels (there were about 6 greys there) and I almost got knocked over!

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Don't use it all the time because you want your grey to respond to it when you use it. If you use it all the time some greys will stop responding. I use mine about every two months to keep the dogs responding and coming to me when they hear it.

Judy, mom to Darth Vader, Bandita, And Angel

Forever in our hearts, DeeYoGee, Dani, Emmy, Andy, Heart, Saint, Valentino, Arrow, Gee, Bebe, Jilly Bean, Bullitt, Pistol, Junior, Sammie, Joey, Gizmo, Do Bee

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Guest BlueCrab

I have a similar sort of obnoxious squeaky toy that I picked up just for this purpose, although it's not a true squawker. I have a couple stashed around and they're only to be used in the event that Trixie gets loose. Every once in a while I'll bring it out, like others have stated, just to reinforce that it's REALLY good for her to come when this crazy thing sounds.

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I consider squawkers one (of two) most important tools available to potentially capture a lost/loose Greyhound. We would not squawk ours on purpose to tease our hounds because we want them to respond just as seriously in an emergency as they did during their racing life. (The other most important tool (that we hope to never need) is a large live trap.)

 

Here's a copy of my previous reply about predator calls/squawkers. Posted 12 October 2012

 

I agree with keeping squawkers available for emergencies only, not for play. Retired racing Greyhounds were extremely highly trained with squawkers during schooling/racing. Most pet owners aren't able to keep rewards HIGH enough without desensitizing some Greyhounds over time.

 

We keep several squawkers in house and car (different sizes) for emergency use only for escaped hounds. We take both small/large sizes when traveling. Long retired Greyhounds remember that sound. I dropped one in garage while packing for a trip, awakening a pack of hounds suddenly ready to break through a closed door.

 

In lieu of using a squawker for more casual recalls, we use a whistle to practice recalls inside house/fenced enclosures. Whistles are smaller, easily worn around human's neck, and sound carries well. Food treats coupled with positive verbal rewards are important throughout life for dogs who respond to coming when called. :)

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Guest SealDogMermaid

This is the first i have heard of squawkers, and after reading I simply must have one on hand in case of emergency. Can anyone recommend a good place to get one and/or good brand/model to use?

 

 

I consider squawkers one (of two) most important tools available to potentially capture a lost/loose Greyhound. We would not squawk ours on purpose to tease our hounds because we want them to respond just as seriously in an emergency as they did during their racing life. (The other most important tool (that we hope to never need) is a large live trap.)

 

Here's a copy of my previous reply about predator calls/squawkers. Posted 12 October 2012

 

I agree with keeping squawkers available for emergencies only, not for play. Retired racing Greyhounds were extremely highly trained with squawkers during schooling/racing. Most pet owners aren't able to keep rewards HIGH enough without desensitizing some Greyhounds over time.

 

We keep several squawkers in house and car (different sizes) for emergency use only for escaped hounds. We take both small/large sizes when traveling. Long retired Greyhounds remember that sound. I dropped one in garage while packing for a trip, awakening a pack of hounds suddenly ready to break through a closed door.

 

In lieu of using a squawker for more casual recalls, we use a whistle to practice recalls inside house/fenced enclosures. Whistles are smaller, easily worn around human's neck, and sound carries well. Food treats coupled with positive verbal rewards are important throughout life for dogs who respond to coming when called. :)

 

So are you saying that one should not "keep them keen" on the squawker every month or two with a high reward treat? I suppose it would make me nervous to just assume that after say, a year of not hearing it once that it would work in an emergency situation. But i suppose then i would be testing the response to ease my own nerves (haha) which could then ironically de-sensitize them to it? Perhaps the whistle training would work for us too - mainly so i can feel like i am doing something proactively to help their recall in case of emergency. Do you just use a standard dog whistle? Could you recommend any?

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Guest zombrie

I keep a squawker at home for "just in case".

The only time mine hear a squawker is at the LGRA races we go to.

 

If you want a good play toy, buy a lunge whip and tie a stuffy or plastic bag at the end. Mine love that

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Guest Clawsandpaws

I keep a squawker at home for "just in case".

The only time mine hear a squawker is at the LGRA races we go to.

 

If you want a good play toy, buy a lunge whip and tie a stuffy or plastic bag at the end. Mine love that

 

 

I couldn't find a lunge whip in my area (ordering one online) so instead I bought a long (like 4 ft) cat teaser with the intention of tying a stuffy to it... But my cat enjoyed it so much I have to keep it as is. Lol.

This is the first i have heard of squawkers, and after reading I simply must have one on hand in case of emergency. Can anyone recommend a good place to get one and/or good brand/model to use?

 

 

I consider squawkers one (of two) most important tools available to potentially capture a lost/loose Greyhound. We would not squawk ours on purpose to tease our hounds because we want them to respond just as seriously in an emergency as they did during their racing life. (The other most important tool (that we hope to never need) is a large live trap.)

 

Here's a copy of my previous reply about predator calls/squawkers. Posted 12 October 2012

 

I agree with keeping squawkers available for emergencies only, not for play. Retired racing Greyhounds were extremely highly trained with squawkers during schooling/racing. Most pet owners aren't able to keep rewards HIGH enough without desensitizing some Greyhounds over time.

 

We keep several squawkers in house and car (different sizes) for emergency use only for escaped hounds. We take both small/large sizes when traveling. Long retired Greyhounds remember that sound. I dropped one in garage while packing for a trip, awakening a pack of hounds suddenly ready to break through a closed door.

 

In lieu of using a squawker for more casual recalls, we use a whistle to practice recalls inside house/fenced enclosures. Whistles are smaller, easily worn around human's neck, and sound carries well. Food treats coupled with positive verbal rewards are important throughout life for dogs who respond to coming when called. :)

 

So are you saying that one should not "keep them keen" on the squawker every month or two with a high reward treat? I suppose it would make me nervous to just assume that after say, a year of not hearing it once that it would work in an emergency situation. But i suppose then i would be testing the response to ease my own nerves (haha) which could then ironically de-sensitize them to it? Perhaps the whistle training would work for us too - mainly so i can feel like i am doing something proactively to help their recall in case of emergency. Do you just use a standard dog whistle? Could you recommend any?

 

I had to buy mine from the adoption center, its called a Scotch Game Call: Predator Call, by Pete Rickard, inc. I have never seen anything like it in other big name pet stores.2

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Guest SealDogMermaid

 

I had to buy mine from the adoption center, its called a Scotch Game Call: Predator Call, by Pete Rickard, inc. I have never seen anything like it in other big name pet stores.2

You can get both a pocket-size squawker (I have their mini squirrel call) and the larger predator call from GEM. Here's the LINK.

 

Great! Thanks to both of you! I'm glad i stumbled upon this thread!

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Guest zombrie

You can get both a pocket-size squawker (I have their mini squirrel call) and the larger predator call from GEM. Here's the LINK.

I tried the smaller one to put in my bag on our walks just in case somehow they get away from me, but when I tried it they don't respond to it... They only respond to that big predator call. Could just be my pups though :dunno

ETA Nevermind, I guess I got the rabbit call. I've never seen the squirrel one before. Does it sound anything like the larger one? I wish I could find a video of the sound to see if they respond to it

ETA Again, I found one :) Doolin barely flicked an ear and Minerva didn't even do that. Sigh!!

Here's the link of it being used if someone else wants to see if their dogs respond to it

Edited by zombrie
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I consider squawkers one (of two) most important tools available to potentially capture a lost/loose Greyhound. We would not squawk ours on purpose to tease our hounds because we want them to respond just as seriously in an emergency as they did during their racing life.

 

In lieu of using a squawker for more casual recalls, we use a whistle to practice recalls inside house/fenced enclosures. Whistles are smaller, easily worn around human's neck, and sound carries well. Food treats coupled with positive verbal rewards are important throughout life for dogs who respond to coming when called. :)

So are you saying that one should not "keep them keen" on the squawker every month or two with a high reward treat? I suppose it would make me nervous to just assume that after say, a year of not hearing it once that it would work in an emergency situation. But i suppose then i would be testing the response to ease my own nerves (haha) which could then ironically de-sensitize them to it? Perhaps the whistle training would work for us too - mainly so i can feel like i am doing something proactively to help their recall in case of emergency. Do you just use a standard dog whistle? Could you recommend any?

 

I happen to be in the camp of not sounding squawkers unless an emergency. As mentioned, rewards from pet owners are often not high enough (from hound's perspective) to warrant hound's repeated peak reactions. Peak reaction is needed for an escaped/lost hound in an outside environment full of distractions. Most racing Greyhounds arrive into retirement already trained with a squawker sound perpetually imprinted on their brain.

 

One example: If I'm heading out on a lost Greyhound search, and move a large squawker to the car accidently making even a hint of a squawk sound, ALL our hounds jump to their paws rushing flying towards that sound, including our long retired (many years) seniors. Many hounds never forget that sound. (IMO, large squawkers are much more effective than small ones.)

 

I'll add that not every Greyhound raced and some may not respond to a squawker, especially small squawkers (some extremely shy hounds might be scared), but if your hound is highly squawker reactive like most retired racers, they are an inexpensive tool that can help lure a loose hound back to safety.

 

Our whistles are like a coach or physical education teacher would use. We keep one next to a treat container to give a short double whistle to call hounds over for an extra special treat. (We only give these high value treats once every few of weeks.) We keep whistles in cars for an emergency, and take on leashed hound hikes.

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Guest SealDogMermaid

 

 

I happen to be in the camp of not sounding squawkers unless an emergency. As mentioned, rewards from pet owners are often not high enough (from hound's perspective) to warrant hound's repeated peak reactions. Peak reaction is needed for an escaped/lost hound in an outside environment full of distractions. Most racing Greyhounds arrive into retirement already trained with a squawker sound perpetually imprinted on their brain.

 

One example: If I'm heading out on a lost Greyhound search, and move a large squawker to the car accidently making even a hint of a squawk sound, ALL our hounds jump to their paws rushing flying towards that sound, including our long retired (many years) seniors. Many hounds never forget that sound. (IMO, large squawkers are much more effective than small ones.)

 

I'll add that not every Greyhound raced and some may not respond to a squawker, especially small squawkers (some extremely shy hounds might be scared), but if your hound is highly squawker reactive like most retired racers, they are an inexpensive tool that can help lure a loose hound back to safety.

 

Our whistles are like a coach or physical education teacher would use. We keep one next to a treat container to give a short double whistle to call hounds over for an extra special treat. (We only give these high value treats once every few of weeks.) We keep whistles in cars for an emergency, and take on leashed hound hikes.

 

Great that really helps- thanks for the info! Also answers my next question about which size squawker would be best - def going for the big guns on that I think! I am anxious to get started on our whistle training! Will be picking up several for around the house/car/jacket pocket :-)

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Guest undergreysspell

I bought a small squirrel squawker but Gracie doesn't even flinch. If anyone has a dog that would react to it I would be happy to send it to you. Hate to let it go to waste if someone can use it.

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