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Painful Greyhound Situation


Guest VinnyL
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Guest VinnyL

Hi, really looking for some experienced Greyhound advice. Well me and my wife adopted 2 greys boy and girl basically same age 2yrs old. Our situation is our poor boy has corns on 3 paws, ngap did laser surgery on two paws left the 3rd go for now. We only had them for 11/2 months he has been in pain since the 1st week, unable to walk in or out of hse, his just starting to wlk with his booties outside but it doesn't seem enjoyable at all his head is down. We are really concerned for a couple of reason 1will live in south Philly so its All concrete and we have hard wood floors so there's no relief. Our goal was to give a nice home we feel terrible it might always be painful for him and the other part is our girl is she paying a price to its always about his comfort, we feel she gets short end we are unable to go out for long walks or take her on runs and if we do is fair to him to leave him alone . We feel damned if we do or damned if we don't. Seems like they both are suffering in one form or another. We are hurting to make right decision and we are new owners. We adopted two young ones so we can to active stuff and feel lost any advice or experience,thanks as always. we really want to do the right thing for all of us

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I'm sorry, I'm not sure what you're asking. Are you looking for help with corns? I'm sure there are many people here who can offer advice.

Edited by robinw

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Guest VinnyL

Really not sure lol, I guess is it better for him to try and get a place with a yard with grass and if I'm honest am I going to be able to give the care he needs, the reason we adopted young we just went through nursing our Maya who was 16and we love and miss her dearly.

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He may only be getting used to his booties as it can take a bit of time. As for the corns, I have read they can be very painful and thankfully we have no experience. I know there are some on here who do have experience and I hope they chime in soon. Can you edit your subject to something like "Corns - Need Help/Advice"? It may help get more replies.

Kyle with Stewie ('Super C Ledoux, Super C Sampson x Sing It Blondie) and forever missing my three angels, Jack ('Roy Jack', Greys Flambeau x Miss Cobblepot) and Charlie ('CTR Midas Touch', Leo's Midas x Hallo Argentina) and Shelby ('Shari's Hooty', Flying Viper x Shari Carusi) running free across the bridge.

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I have two litter mates who each have corns. We have them hulled. One of them has a constant limp but I'll tell you what, when he gets out in the back yard and takes off running you wouldn't even know it. He totally forgets the discomfort he feels in that foot with the corn. These boys are my 2 and 3 greyhounds with corns and dogs can live a happy life even with corns. Do what you can to treat them and once he gets used to the booty I'd start taking him on short walks to see how he does. All of my corn dogs have been happy and healthy despite the corns.

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Forever in our hearts, DeeYoGee, Dani, Emmy, Andy, Heart, Saint, Valentino, Arrow, Gee, Bebe, Jilly Bean, Bullitt, Pistol, Junior, Sammie, Joey, Gizmo, Do Bee

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Hi VinnyL, We don't have a grey yet, but are planning to adopt once our beloved 20 year old kitten passes on. We've been trying to educate ourselves on everything there is to know about greys, and in doing so, I came across a pdf article on one owner's experience with her grey's serious corn problem.

 

I think that if the ex racer we adopt ever develops corns, we would try the treatment explained in this pdf link before considering anything more invasive (such as surgery, which unfortunately does not result in a cure anyway). This treatment is not a cure either, but it seems to have given the owner some confidence, as well as confirmation, that her grey is beginning to enjoy life again; not to mention relief that his corns are at least manageable. Here is the link:

 

http://www.steelcitygreyhounds.org/downloads/corn.pdf

 

Are your greys a pair bond? I really hate to suggest this, but If they are not, there is the option of surrendering one, so that both dogs' needs can ultimately be met. Such a heartbreaking position to be in; I feel for your family and hope that you will not have to choose this option.

 

Hopefully, an experienced corndogger will chime in with sage advice for you.

Edited by deboosh

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Oh gosh, I can see that would be sad. We have an oldie we took on thinking he would have the same kind of activity level as our younger tripod, only to find that the old guy needs far more exercise. Poor tripod Sid is getting jealous seeing Jeffie go out on long walks without him, which was really NOT the intention when we adopted. Some days we restrict Jeff to Sid's level which isn't totally fair on him, either.

 

Thing is, they are very attached to each other. They love being together, even though there are some aspects of their lives they'd probably change if they could. I know both would be sad to lose their companion.

 

Could it be true of your two as well? Maybe being together is enough to make up for the lack that you perceive?

 

As to the corns, I don't have personal experience, I'm happy to say, but I have heard good things about the corn cream you can get from a pharmacy somewhere in the US. The Murray Avenue Apothecary.

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I had a foster that had 12 corns hulled. The poor thing couldn't walk until he came out of the vet's office! He pranced out! His adopter's only have to have one done every now and then. Thera paws are your answer.

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Guest LindsaySF

My Andy has corns on all 4 feet. I hull them myself about once a month. He only limps or favors them when we've been on hard surfaces for too long. He also has some muscle and bone injuries though, so some limping could be due to that.

 

See this link about hulling: http://www.grassmere-animal-hospital.com/corn_hulling.htm

 

Did your boy's corns grow back? (On the two feet that were lasered). If not, he might just be resisting the booties and needs some time to get used to them.

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I'm sorry about your previous dog - that must have been difficult.

 

I'm not sure I'm reading this right ... you want to return a dog because it has corns? Did I misread this?

 

One of my dogs has corns and I have been able to use creams and get them hulled so that he can do walks and such. At one point, he had a few corns but, with treatments it is down considerably.

 

If you get another dog, there is no guarantee that you would be able to do runs with that one (corns or not). Some dogs are not going to have the stamina to run slower speeds and longer distances as they are sprinters better suited to run short distances at fast speeds. Some people have had luck training their dogs to run but, again .. no guarantees.

 

I guess I'm trying to get my head around what I feel about someone returning a dog because of corns but, you sure as heck don't have to worry about my opinion - it's the adoption group that counts. I would imagine the group would take the dog back but, what would their attitude be on getting you a replacement dog -- can't say .. maybe others on the forum would have a better idea.

 

If you get another dog, they could have other problems .. maybe more serious ones. Corns are treatable but, you might have to make adjustments in your life until you get them to a manageable point and there is a question whether that would be possible although my opinion is that you can probably get the corns better -- maybe not perfect but, better.

 

Whether you decide to deal with what life has handed you is your choice (and I don't mean to say a particular choice is good or bad). Also, being an astrologer I can't stop myself from adding - "sometimes life hands you what you need, not what you want". If this is one of those "situations", then you might take the dog back but, something else will come in as a replacement to teach the same lesson.

 

Tough decision ...

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MaryJane, I don't think it's as simple as "returning a dog because it has corns". It sounds like the OP is sincerely concerned about the dog's happiness and welfare since they live in the city with no yard, so everything is concrete outside and their house has hardwood floors. And we all know that walking on hard surfaces is more painful for dogs with corns.

 

For the OP, I was wondering if you'd tried hulling the corns before the laser surgery. While some don't, most dogs with corns get significant relief when the corn is "hulled" and/or when the hard parts of the pad are filed down with a Dremel. This does need to be done on a regular basis, but as others have mentioned, it's even something you can learn to do yourself. Here's an article about corns and hulling. It make take a little time for him to get used to the booties, but most are a lot more comfortable walking on hard surfaces with the booties on too.

 

And finally, I wonder if some of his head down, depressed attitude may be a reflection of your mood and constant worry about him. If you feel sorry for him, and feel terrible about his corns all the time, his behavior will reflect that. Try to provide him with strength and support, and a confident attitude that you'll overcome this. I know many greyhounds with corns who are happy and outgoing, even though they may limp and be uncomfortable at times.

Jennifer &

Willow (Wilma Waggle), Wiki (Wiki Hard Ten), Carter (Let's Get It On),

Ollie (whippet), Gracie (whippet x), & Terra (whippet) + Just Saying + Just Alice

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Guest LindsaySF

Also, did you say you've only had the dogs 1.5 months? If so, you haven't seen their true personalities yet. It takes them a while to acclimate to a new home sometimes (6 months to a year). So if the dogs seem depressed or not happy that could be part of it. Andy was depressed with life the first 6 months I had him. He's a different dog now. :)

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MaryJane, I don't think it's as simple as "returning a dog because it has corns". It sounds like the OP is sincerely concerned about the dog's happiness and welfare since they live in the city with no yard, so everything is concrete outside and their house has hardwood floors. And we all know that walking on hard surfaces is more painful for dogs with corns.

 

 

I agree that this is not simple and the OP is concerned about the dog. And I'm truly not trying to make any judgements about any direction where this might be heading or not. But, when I hear "about doing the right thing" or "how it is not fair to another dog" and "wanting to take hikes", then my mind starts to drift in the direction of whether this couple is prepared to have a dog that may not fit into the lifestyle that they envision, at least at this time.

 

As noted in the original post, the owners are hurting and concerned about what is going on and want to make the right decision. One of those decisions seems to be the option of returning the dog (it's the white elephant in the room).

 

I may be off-base here and if so, I apologize for that.

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Guest DeniseL

My husband is the OP. Please understand that we do not want to return our hound because he has corns. When we adopted our hounds we understood that at some point they would have medical issues and illnesses. It would be naive on the part of any adopter to think otherwise.

 

I would be dishonest if I said we were not somewhat frustrated and feeling very powerless to help him. Our boy was home with us for a week and a half before he developed his limp. He was then diagnosed for 4 corns on 3 feet, poor thing. I have written posts previously expressing my sadness about this situation. He was just starting to feel a little comfortable and then he had surgery. He has had a rough road and, I believe, it has been a deterent in building trust with him. We have changed bandages, carried him to the corner to relieve himself, given him space and tons of patience (and treats! :) ). We bought him Thera paws for all his feet and wears them everytime we walk. I just ordered him thera paw slippers for in the house.

 

However, I would also be dishonest if I didn't wonder if he would be happier in a home with a grass yard so he wasn't on concrete for every walk. I just wish we had more comfortable surfaces for him. Our main floor is hardwood and in order to get to any grass he has to walk at least 4 blocks. I just feel terrible for him. That being said, I am sure we are not the first city dwellers to have a corndog. We will make it work and do everything in our power to give him a happy, comfortable life.

 

It has been a very bad few weeks for all of us, but I am happy to report that he is walking MUCH, MUCH better!!! He has no problem wearing his booties now, except that it does rub his knuckles a bit on the front two paws, but I don't think that is real serious. He can put weight on both paws that were operated on and the holes have healed up almost completely.

 

Just as importantly, he is starting to come out of his shell and show his personality. He was a zombie the first few weeks. I felt for sure he hated us and our home. Today, I don't feel that way. He was just terrified. He would growl and snarl sometimes when we changed his booties and bandages. I would imagine that is normal, considering he really doesn't know us, he is scared, and he is in pain. Never bit or even attempted to.

 

Our girl is adjusting, also. We just have to take her for more/longer walks without him. Today we even took them both for a run together. I know it might make his paws hurt a little more, but I think he needed to strech his legs and just feel like a greyhound again, doing what he loves. He chased our girl around and they had a ball!! I gave him a rymadyl after just in case and he seems fine, now. He is just snoozing on his bed.

 

I also believe that nothing happens in this world by mistake. We recieved the two hounds we were meant to love and take care of. There will be growth in this for all of us. These hounds have taught me true patience and understanding. I am grateful for the entire experience, especially this forum, which has given us such wondeful support and feedback. :beatheart (And given us a platform to vent when we get overwelmed)

 

I just made him an appointment with a homeopathic vet that helped my Maya during her last few years. She specializes in accupuncture, chinese herbs, pain managment, total body wellness, etc. She told me she treated greyhounds with corns in her general practice, but has not had the oppurtunity to since she has started this specialty. I am not sure she will be able to help him, but she told me she was up for the challange!! So, I hope, to win the war on corns. We will keep everyone posted....

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I want to say I do understand where you are coming from. I know from experience how painful walking can be for them on hard surfaces.

I had to walk Nadir along the grassy easement on our street when he was suffering with his corn. When he did have to walk on the pavement it was extremely painful for him. I don't remember if I mentioned this in another thread you may have, but it took about 3 months for Nadir's toe to heal after surgery, but when it finally did oh what a difference it made. He not only would step off the easement and walk on the pavement he would break into a trot. It's been 2 years since the removal of that corn and it has never come back. I really hope your boy is as lucky with his results.

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Hi-

Like you, we are just starting to learn "all about corns"... We now have a 9-1/2 year old male, Blake, who has them. His previous family told us that he had them but that they didn't cause him any pain. (But he wouldn't let anyone touch his feet. And periodically, he would limp for no reason. Hmm, we said.) He has lots of corns. We have had him since July 7 and we have already had two "corn parties"-- removed 6 corns each time, using the procedure and pics from the Grassmere vet site (link earlier in this thread). We need to have another party tonight. We are now in our 11th year of having greyhounds... so I can't say that we would have done this when we first adopted greyhounds (was your angel Maya a greyhound?), but it seems the best route for us now. With the manual removal, they do come back (and today he is limping a bit, so we will be looking at that paw for corns tonight). Our goal is to get the number of corns down and then try the Murray Avenue corn creme (also link earlier in the thread). Maybe the creme would be a better route to try if you don't like the idea of picking corns out of paw pads with sharp objects.

 

And, you probably know this, but, don't hestitate to put his muzzle on when you have to manipulate his feet and he seems to be in pain. And, there are two of you... one to hold him and pet him and the other one to change the bandage, put on the therapaw etc.

 

The therapaws should help... make sure to give him treats frequently while you are putting them on, wearing them, and taking them off. TheraPaws = I get treats!

 

Don't give up! JillysFullHouse is an expert on this board... so I think you can believe her when she says the boy can still have a long and happy life!

 

BTW- don't know exactly where you live in S. Philly, but there is some grass at 10th and Locust. They (where I work) go through periods of not wanting dogs on the grass, but I think if you are there after 5pm and use your poop pick up bags, you could probably let them walk on the grass...

 

Hang in there... it sounds like you really love your two recent additions to the family and this is a good place to ask for suggestions. Greyhounds are very good at adapting. They probably do sense your frustration as they are also very sensitive. Just make sure that you also tell them how much you love them and give lots of hugs.

 

Sincerely,

 

Carol

Greyhound Fleece Jackets

 

Greyhound Pack: Festus, EdWin, and Jethro; Angels Janet, Faster, Blake, Navarre, and Murray.

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Corns are a pain in the . . . foot. Literally! I have a girl who I've had for almost 9 years and she has a corn on one paw that plagues her. I've recently started using the dremmel on it and she gets much relief from the pain. I have another who has corns on several toes and I dremmel those too and although she gets stressed she also gets relief. It is ongoing care but very worth the time and effort. It also gets easier on both you and the dog the more you do it.

Hang in there.

june

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