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Greyhounds And Young Children.


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Guest Amba1027

Hello everyone,

 

I am a new member here but not new to greyhounds. My parents had a couple while I was growing up and have one now. I really love them and would love to adopt my own someday. But I have a problem. My boyfriend has a son who is 4. He comes to stay with us for a week once a month. I was looking at some greyhound adoption sites and they all seem to agree that greyhounds should not go to homes where there is a child under the age of six. While I understand why greyhounds and young children wouldn't be a good mix, I didn't realize that they just set a general rule about it. I would think they would try and see which one's might be child friendly similarly to how they see if they are cat friendly. I can't imagine that everyone who has ever adopted a greyhound has not had young children in the time frame that they owned the greyhound. There must be some child friendly one's out there, right? Does anyone know of an adoption site that tries to see if the greys are child friendly?

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My daughter adopted her first greyhound when her son was two years old and her second when he was 4 or 5. My son and DIL had a greyhound when their daughter was born. He passed and then thye adopted a 10 month old greyhound puppy. I know many people with small children and greyhounds. Turning the situation around; you adopt a greyhound and then have a child, do they come and take the dog away until your babe is 6 years old. Teach your children to respect the dog, keep them separated when necessary, train your dog with basic skills and in most circumstances there should be no problem. Find an adoption group to meet your needs.

Irene Ullmann w/Flying Odin in Lower Delaware
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Guest Wasserbuffel

Some groups have that policy due to a large number of people who return dogs (it's not just greys) because they allow the child to annoy the dog and think the dog is "aggressive" when it snaps at the child.

 

Not all groups do though. The man who fostered my grey had a daughter who was two when he began fostering and has never had a problem. Grey's aren't child-unfriendly by nature, but the way they were raised means they're sometimes less tolerant of what parents let their children get away with around a dog than a dog that grows up in a family home.

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Guest FastDogsOwnMe

I adopted a TEN year old greyhound this year. She sleeps in my bed with my son using her as a pillow, all night every night. They love each other. A four year old can learn manners. My son is three. Not all groups have this rule, thankfully. We have five hounds with our son.

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If the 4 year old has been brought up in a family environment with dogs then there shouldn't be a big problem with a nice friendly Greyhound.

Be quite specific in stating to the adoption group that you're looking for a calm Greyhound without food aggressive and sleep-startle issues - these being the two main triggers for problems with little children. A fostered Greyhound will have all these things assessed practically.

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Guest Yankeegreyhound

I had greyhounds first and then I had three kids. When Hailey passed and I went to get Sonny, I took the kids with me so that everyone was a part of the decision.

 

I suggest you fill out an application and explain your situation to the group. While some groups are adament about not adopting to families with young children, others will base it on a case by case situation.

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As others have said, not all adoption groups have an age requirement for adopting to families with children. Our group does not have a blanket policy but we do take extra time with those potential adopters who have small children. We want to make sure they understand what is involved with having a greyhound and small children. The ones we are most concerned about are those who have never had a dog at all. But we go over things like making sure the child doesn't bother the greyhound while it's eating, sleeping or lying on it's bed.

 

We also do home visits so we are able to observe the family and the child or children to see what the dynamics are. If possible we encourage them to also come to a meet & greet with the entire family and that is another place to observe the interaction of the child and our greyhounds. As long as the parent(s) clearly understand that you need to be vigilent about monitoring the dog and the child I am sure it wouldn't be a problem for us.

 

Find another group that will work with you. There are lots of groups out there. Good luck.

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Guest Snazzy_Chloe

What concerns me is that the child will only be in your house for one week a month so he will not be a normal part of the dogs life. I think everything will be fine as long as you are around anytime that the child and the dog are together. I would be concerned if they are together and you are not present. Make up a list of dog rules for the child to follow and you should be all right. #1 Rule is when the dog is on his pillow - the child cannot go and pet the dog because it mey be sleeping + it is the dogs area not the childs. No jumping on the dog etc.

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Our first two came into our lives when our girls were 3 and 5. We monitored closely and are vigilant parents but we never had an issue. 4 years later, we have 4 hounds and I am so glad we persevered and adopted even though the girls were young. We've had some great times, all together! Make it happen, but be smart about it!

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Derek

Follow my Ironman journeys and life with dogs, cats and busy kids: A long road

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Guest fluteplayer67

We adopted our first greyhound a few months ago and we have a 7 year old and 4 year old. What made us so comfortable was that his foster family had two young children and were more than willing to discuss any issues we had. We also have a cat and they tolerate each other fine. Our adoption group identifies the greys that are not cat safe or kid safe so we really went by that and then had two home visits.

 

Our kids do get loud and run around the house and Jett could care less, which I was amazed at. We do have to get after our 4 year old to make sure she is petting him correctly and to leave him alone if he is sleeping but I think if you do your research and educate your boyfriend's child you will be fine. Greys are such a special breed, so sweet and I am certain you can find one with the right temperament for you.

 

 

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it's true that not all greyhound organizations require child-free homes as a prerequisite for adoption..but aside from the posters who mentioned their dogs here, I have yet to meet a Greyhound owner who is not either a single adult or a couple/family with children over the age of sixteen (I live in Switzerland).

Unless children are extremely well behaved, which can't be expected 100% of the time, Greyhounds, who are prone to timidness and are generally reserved dogs..may not be the best choice. My Galgo has very little tolerance for children and regards them as either a threat or is unsure of how to react around them and thus becomes defensive. I suppose if you truly want a Greyhound, it is best to work with an adoption agency to find one that is child-friendly and not particularly fearful, since the issue between children and Greys is that the dog is frightened of the child and thus reacts defensively or "aggressively". Many of the Greyhounds and Galgos I know here have the same attitude - defensive or at the best uninterested.

<a href="http://www.flickr.co...06/7795202048/" title="galaxia by xxblinkvanaxx, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm9.staticf...79cd66138e.jpg" width="500" height="375" alt="galaxia"></a> <a href="http://www.flickr.co...06/7795208622/" title="budsy by xxblinkvanaxx, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm9.staticf...2000e54156.jpg" width="500" height="375" alt="budsy"></a>

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Guest FastDogsOwnMe

Most US greyhounds are not shy or fearful at all, though, unlike many Galgos. The vast majority are very friendly and have had very happy lives and love all people.

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I adopted Annie Bella in July 2011. My granddaughter was 5 at the time, and as it's been since her birth, she visits me regularly and I visit her. Annie Bella is always happy to see her with a gentle tail wag and a smile and then she goes back to her bed and ignores her because one can't play and sleep at the same time, and most of the time, Annie Bella chooses sleep. :D Ember can run around, dance, sing, eat in front of her, etc., and Annie Bella ignores it all. When Ember was born, they had 2 cats and a dog so she was taught from a few months of age to be gentle, kind and respectful of animals.

 

Kids and Greyhounds can live together with the right dog and the right kids.

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Guest LindsaySF

Most US greyhounds are not shy or fearful at all, though, unlike many Galgos. The vast majority are very friendly and have had very happy lives and love all people.

But I think US hounds seem to have more space/sleep issues.

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Most US greyhounds are not shy or fearful at all

 

I agree - most retired racing greyhounds in the US are not timid or generally defensive around children. Not all greyhound adoption groups have set rules about kids. Our group has foster homes with kids under 10 years old, and have placed a number of dogs into homes with younger children (although mostly over 5 years old). We make placement decisions on a case-by-case basis (for both the family and the dog) and pretty much have no blanket exclusions.

 

I've done several home visits for families with kids in the 5-11 range, and all were approved to adopt. My male Wiki loves kids, and on more than one occasion, these families with children jokingly ask if they can have him at the end of the home visit. However, especially with children, I'm always careful to explain about proper body language and behavior around dogs, respecting their hound's space when resting, and making sure they are always supervised. For a child under 4-5 years old like the OP is asking about, it would fall even more on parental supervsion and management.

 

But I think US hounds seem to have more space/sleep issues.

 

More space/sleep issues compared to what? Hounds in other countries, or other breeds of dogs? I'm not convinced that greyhounds have more space issues than other dogs. The space issues we see described with greyhounds here happen in other breeds and mixed breeds as well. What I have noticed is that the greyhound community seems a little more understanding of and more willing to work with dogs who show this behavior. Many other dogs are turned in to a shelter or put down the first time they snap at a child.

 

The biggest issue I see with adopting to families with children is that most people do not have a very good understanding of canine behavior and body language, and they expect too much of dogs. All of the 'cute' photos circulating on the 'net of kids hugging dogs, lying, sitting, or even standing on top of dogs, or otherwise invading their space is testament to this. IMO, it is unrealistic to expect any dog, not just greyhounds, to put up with this type of treatment.

 

I realize that there are many dogs that do tolerate these types of interactions. Although looking at the subtle body language, I'd suspect most dogs are just tolerating, and not actually enjoying it. But what happens if that dog doesn't feel good one day? If the child gets hurt, or sometimes even if the dog growls or snaps without contact, the dog gets labeled aggressive, and often ends up losing his home, or his life. For me, this is just too much of a risk. I doubt parents who allow these types of interactions are very understanding or forgiving if the dog objects one day. They are usually totally shocked and blame the dog for "turning" and consider it an unprovoked bite.

 

This is actually something that I've been thinking about lately. What do you feel are appropriate interactions between dogs and children? What exactly constitutes a 'child safe' dog? Should a dog who is 'child safe' be expected to tolerate hugging and kissing, or being sat on? Should they be expected to put up with kids climbing onto the dog bed and snuggling with them?

 

The comparison has also been made to young couples who have kids after adopting their dog, but from what I've seen, the dynamics are different. Adopting a new dog into a family already with young children seems to be a bit different from a dog who is settled into a home adjusting to the addition of a child. I've seen dogs who have nervous tendencies, who have never been comfortable around strange children, do just fine when their owners have kids of their own.

Jennifer &

Willow (Wilma Waggle), Wiki (Wiki Hard Ten), Carter (Let's Get It On),

Ollie (whippet), Gracie (whippet x), & Terra (whippet) + Just Saying + Just Alice

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Guest LindsaySF

But I think US hounds seem to have more space/sleep issues.

More space/sleep issues compared to what? Hounds in other countries, or other breeds of dogs?

Both, but in this case I was referring to Greyhounds in other countries vs the US. I have seen it said several times by UK hound people that they don't see as much space aggression over there. Some people have speculated that the pairing of dogs in kennels over there vs individual crating in the US plays a part. I personally think genetics plays a strong part as well, especially in sleep aggression.

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I have seen it said several times by UK hound people that they don't see as much space aggression over there. Some people have speculated that the pairing of dogs in kennels over there vs individual crating in the US plays a part. I personally think genetics plays a strong part as well, especially in sleep aggression.

 

Interesting...I hadn't heard this before, but I haven't interacted much with greyhound people from other countries. Would love to hear more from some of the UK members here. I always find it interesting to learn about how things are different in other countries. I agree that genetics plays a large role in behavior and temperament.

Jennifer &

Willow (Wilma Waggle), Wiki (Wiki Hard Ten), Carter (Let's Get It On),

Ollie (whippet), Gracie (whippet x), & Terra (whippet) + Just Saying + Just Alice

gtsig3.jpg

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Frankly, I would be more concerned that child was grey friendly. I grew up with all sorts of pets and animals around the house. Where, if the pet retaliated (Vocally or otherwise, the first reaction was, "What did you do to the dog/pet?!" Not what parents of later generations turned into, by blaming the animal. Son raised the same way)

 

My son was born into a home with a cat, dog & ferrets. He has always had a surreal gentleness with animals.When he was 4.5 I started researching dogs and found Sammi. I fell in love with her picture and was determined to adopt her (to the point that I filled out my app in a way that only she fit my "criteria" yeah, I've evil that way :lol ) But even tho I wanted her, I knew that there had to be a connection between her and DS for her to be in my home. If they didn't clique, she wasn't going to be the dog for us.

 

Thankfully, they clicked :wub:

 

PricelessGotchaDay.jpg

 

This was Sammi's Gotcha Day. 15 minutes after she arrived home. DS was on the futon first, she chose to climb up there with him. He is technically 4 in that picture. He turned 5 a few weeks later.

 

BTW~ We were required to read Childproofing Your Dog because I had a young child in the home.

 

I disregarded 75% of the book. I didn't believe in making a pet tolerate rude behaviour from a child. I chose, instead, to instill respect for a living creature in the child.

 

Now, my roommate's 9 & 12 yr olds? No way would I have brought Sammi into this house if they were the age DS was when we adopted her.

Edited by Gryffenne
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All three of our Greys are pretty good with children....Nixon is a certified 'Child Friendly' Therapy Dog.

 

Our Grandkids are 6 and 4 and they visit once every couple of weeks.

They have been taught to leave the dogs alone if they are laying down and they are respectful of this rule.

 

Ruby snarled at the older child once when she was trying to take a toy from her. No teeth...just a snarl.

That was right after we got Ruby and it scared the crap out of the kids ...and me.

We all learned a valuable lesson.

On the other hand, Ruby loves to be brushed and and is really quite happy to have the kids lead her around the house on a leash.

 

We never leave kids and dogs together unsupervised.

Never.

Not even Nixon.

It only takes a split second for an 'accident' to happen.

 

And, if the dogs have had enough of the kids, they'll just remove themselves and go lie down in another room.

 

As far as the OP...it will depend on the individual kid and the individual dog.

 

Nancy...Mom to Sid (Peteles Tiger), Kibo (112 Carlota Galgos) and Joshi.  Missing Casey, Gomer, Mona, Penelope, BillieJean, Bandit, Nixon (Starz Sammie),  Ruby (Watch Me Dash) Nigel (Nigel), and especially little Mario, waiting at the Bridge.

 

 

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Guest Amba1027

Thank you everyone for your responses. I have had pets my entire life so I know how children should be taught to treat animals properly. My boyfriend's son is good with our two cats but he hasn't been around a dog since he was a baby. I think he might actually be a little afraid of them. It's going to be a bit before we do get a dog so he will be a little older when we do get one. My boyfriend wants us to have been in our new house for a year before we get a dog so I've got 9 more months to wait. I just wish I had some way to start introducing his son to some dogs so by the time we get one he will know how he is supposed to act and treat them.

 

2greytgreys I am glad you posted because you group is in my general area (I'm in MD) so now I know of at least one group I can look at that doesn't go by the child's age alone.

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Why not start by taking the young lad to some Meet & Greets?

 

Nancy...Mom to Sid (Peteles Tiger), Kibo (112 Carlota Galgos) and Joshi.  Missing Casey, Gomer, Mona, Penelope, BillieJean, Bandit, Nixon (Starz Sammie),  Ruby (Watch Me Dash) Nigel (Nigel), and especially little Mario, waiting at the Bridge.

 

 

SKJ-summer.jpg.31e290e1b8b0d604d47a8be586ae7361.jpg

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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

If the 4 year old has been brought up in a family environment with dogs then there shouldn't be a big problem with a nice friendly Greyhound.

Be quite specific in stating to the adoption group that you're looking for a calm Greyhound without food aggressive and sleep-startle issues - these being the two main triggers for problems with little children. A fostered Greyhound will have all these things assessed practically.

 

I would have to say the two main triggers noted here have one thing in common, the parent ALLOWED inappropriate interaction between a dog with big teeth and a young child. Just because a hound may have food issues or space issues, doesnt matter at all if you are a responsible adult and realize you cannot allow your child to treat a dog like its own personal stuffed animal.

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Guest Amba1027

Why not start by taking the young lad to some Meet & Greets?

 

I'll have to talk to his dad about it and see what we can do. I was thinking of taking him to my parents house to meet their grey, but it might be a bit much for him to handle with their other dogs. They are pretty energetic and I think them barking and things might scare him. Maybe I could have my mom bring her to our house so he can meet her... So many things to consider!

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I think the meet and greet idea is a good one, also.

 

And sort of an aside, sleep aggression can be worked on. Capri was highly bed aggressive when we adopted her. Over a year's time we taught her that being aggressive with people was not acceptable (we respected her bed, but the couch/floor were shared space). We have not managed to get her to stop growling at other dogs who approach her when she's laying down, but she's nearly bomb proof with people and kids. A couple months ago we were on vacation with our extended family; I walked into the living room to find my 12 year old niece sharing the couch with Capri watching tv. They were snuggled under a blanket together and most shocking of all, niece was laying ON Capri (head and shoulders on Capri's butt). I had to stare at Capri for a minute to make sure she wasn't showing signs of annoyance - not a bit. Color me gob-smacked.

Sharon, Loki, Freyja, Capri (bridge angel and most beloved heart dog), Ajax (bridge angel) and Sweetie Pie (cat)

Visit Hound-Safe.com by Something Special Pet Supplies for muzzles and other dog safety products

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I think it's because a lot of children don't know how to act around dogs and a lot of people have the unreal expectation that the dog should just let the kids do whatever they want to the dog. I will never forget the call I got one day. A family whose 12 year old greyhound had just passed away and they adopted a 2nd greyhound. They were frantic because the dog was snapping and snarling at the kids. Now mind you in the background it sounded like all heck was breaking loose. I asked what was going on and they said "oh the boys are bouncing on the bed where the dog was laying and hitting him with pillows!" They were told to bring back the dog and maybe wait until the boys were much older before trying to adopt another greyhound. These boys were 5 & 6 at the time. They brought him back and he found a wonderful home.

Judy, mom to Darth Vader, Bandita, And Angel

Forever in our hearts, DeeYoGee, Dani, Emmy, Andy, Heart, Saint, Valentino, Arrow, Gee, Bebe, Jilly Bean, Bullitt, Pistol, Junior, Sammie, Joey, Gizmo, Do Bee

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