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Walking 2 Greys At A Time


Guest VinnyL
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Guest VinnyL

Hi just asking for some feedback,our hounds are doing much better walking ,not planting and if they do they start back up (thank God lol) now my concern is trying to walk them together its a circus act one stops the other keeps going then vice versa and since its so hot I don't want them strugggling and I don't want to sweat my but off lol, so i been walking individual and it works ,except when i take miami( boy ) out thyme (girl) whines but she is the main one who is difficult to walk together but she is fine alone? Do i keep this method up until they are more settled our goal is to walk them both at the same time and just keep trying to get them both out at the same time , now when me and my wife take one each they do good , I don't know if i'm doing something wrong or this is the process of adjusting getting very confused and yes sometimes very frustrating , but i'm doing good staying calm when with them. thanks Vinny

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How long have you had Miami and Thyme?

 

I walk our three grey girls by myself. I don't have any secret training methods. They figured out the best spots and work well together. I have Celeste and Darcy in my right hand - Celeste walks in front and Darcy behind. I have Bonny in my left hand. The only time they get tangled up is when we stop to chat to people.

 

Best of luck! Hopefully someone can give you some tips.

Laura with Celeste (ICU Celeste) and Galgos Beatrix and Encarna
The Horse - Gracie (MD Grace E)
Bridge Angels Faye Oops (Santa Fe Oops), Bonny (
Bonny Drive), Darcy (D's Zipperfoot)

 

 

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I walk our two greyhounds together on four foot leashes. It seems much easier to walk them together on the shorter leashes as opposed to the standard six foot leashes most people use.

 

 

 

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Tricia with Kaia the wolfhound-schnauzer mix
Always missing Murray MaldivesBee Wiseman, River, Hopper, and 
Holly Oaks Holly
“You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows.“          -Bob Dylan

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I walk my two on a connected/coupler leash. Until they "got their groove", I did walk them on 2 separate leashes. I like this connected leash, because I can shorten each side individually, which works out well, as my one guy is glued to my side and the other likes to forge ahead!

 

http://www.petsmart.com/product/index.jsp?productId=11334930&lmdn=Dog+Collars%2C+Tags+%26amp%3B+Leashes

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Jen and Topper. Missing Cole
(Kiowa True Topsy)(Cry Kohlton)

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I walk 3 together on my left. The leashes are looped on my right wrist, and threaded through the fingers on my left hand. This keeps them controlled on the left close by my side. I walk on a bike/walking trail so I have to keep tabs on them and anyone coming up behind us. They walk very nicely this way and I have had many comments on how well behaved they are.

<p>Mom to Kyle (Diehard Kyle) & Angel Gracie (KB's Sankey) Foster Mom for AFG

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Guest PiagetsMom

Maybe you'll have to experiment and see what works best for you and your pups. Like Tricia, I've always used 4 ft leashes, which do seem to make it easier. I always walked Mirage and my bridge girl, Piaget, together, but unlike many, I found it easier to walk one on each side. Granted, it didn't exactly leave a free hand, but they had very different walking styles and it just worked best for them. I'm hoping, at some point, I'll be able to walk Mirage and Maya together - it's nice to knock the walks out all at one time.

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Both poodles in one hand. 2 shorter leashes usually in my left. They have different styles - Brandi is more of a sniffer, Paige trots along like a Sgt having been told to 'secure the perimeter'. She's quite focused. Now they both know the commands 'wait' and 'leave it' 'Come on'. So we can juggle it all. I prefer two leashes to one with a coupler, although DH prefers the coupler, because it gives them a bit more pace to do their thing. PK can be a bit shy about toileting sometimes, Brandi likes to bounce around and do zoomies, sometimes one reacts to another dog and being able to split my dogs helps.

 

TBH it never occurred to me to not walk them together.

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I walk three at once. It does take a bit of practice for both you and them to get into a groove. I use six foot leashes but they don't always get all six feet. And I have to admit the first bit of the walk is a bit of a gong show cause they are so excited like they have never been outside or walked ever before in their lives :P . But then I do insist we all get it together so I have the leashes looped over my right wrist and held in my left hand and off we go. As they settle down, I lengthen the leashes and they pick their positions. Jonah out front, Jessie beside me eithe ron the right or left and Joshy brings up the rear. As long as they are appropriately responsive and are not all over the place I don't mind a relaxed formation. If it gets nuts, I tighten up and they fall back onto my left and we speed up again.

 

it is just practice. You'll get what works for you.

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Susan, Jessie and Jordy NORTHERN SKY GREYHOUND ADOPTION ASSOCIATION

Jack, in my heart forever March 1999-Nov 21, 2008 My Dancing Queen Jilly with me always and forever Aug 12, 2003-Oct 15, 2010

Joshy I will love you always Aug 1, 2004-Feb 22,2013 Jonah my sweetheart May 2000 - Jan 2015

" You will never need to be alone again. I promise this. As your dog, I will sing this promise to you, and whisper it to you at night, every night, with my breath." Stanley Coren

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I walk one off the right hand and one off the left. I will NEVER have leashes close to my fingers again. Da Vid broke my little finger that way. When I had three, I walked Huck and Lady on the right and Da Vid on the left. Never had any trouble.

 

Oh, forgot to say, I use 4' leashes.

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I also use a coupler to walk my two.

Dead%2520Horse%2520fishing%2520007.JPG When I bring in a foster, I put the new dog on the coupler with one of my veterans and they pick up on cues from him/her. I too use a short leash as I've found that though they may think they know where to go, I'm the only one that really does :flip so I don't allow them to walk ahead of me generally. After just a short bit I discover that all 3 are comfortably tagging along next to or behind me. I'm also out for the exercise and fresh air so we don't often stop to sniff pee mail, but when someone has their eyes crossed I do allow them do their thing :)

Jody, Leah & Jimmie
Tavasci%2520august%2520sunset%2520%2528C
You left us much, much too soon Lima & Chip :brokenheart

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Takes patience, time and perserverance. And practice. Treats are always a good motivator to help them go the direction you want. Be calm! ;)

 

If you're walking for potties, two leashes is better because it gives them more freedom. If you're walking for exercise, I'd try a coupler.

Edited by greysmom

Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

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Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

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I walk all three of mine together, too.

Nixon on the left & Nigel & Ruby on the right. None are spooks or high-prey.

It takes practice.

 

I used to put my arm right through all the loops and then hold the leashes farther down, but now I use a 'walking belt' and I LOVE it.

I started this thread a few months ago, after much consideration chose this belt

 

I don't put it aound my waist (I'm little and it's too big), but instead, I put one arm through and it lays on my shoulder.

 

Our leashes have lightweight caribineers (colour co-ordinated, of course!) and they just clip to the centre ring, which is at waist level. .

 

I LOVE it.

I still hold the leashes in my hands, exactly as if the belt wasn't even there, but I don't worry that I may drop one.

 

My three hounds combined are more than twice my weight...I would not walk then this way if they were spooks or high prey.

 

Nancy...Mom to Sid (Peteles Tiger), Kibo (112 Carlota Galgos) and Joshi.  Missing Casey, Gomer, Mona, Penelope, BillieJean, Bandit, Nixon (Starz Sammie),  Ruby (Watch Me Dash) Nigel (Nigel), and especially little Mario, waiting at the Bridge.

 

 

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Guest newbee

I walk my two, a male and female both at the same time, independent 6' leashes looped around my right wrist and held in me left hand. It took a little time for Twilight, the female, to understand sometimes she had to wait while Copper, the male, had to water all the mail post and trees on there walk. I really have no problem, they usually walk side by side or one behind the other other to my left or one on either side. Both will occasionally stop to smell for "Pee Mail", and that can lead to some interesting twists :haha

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Guest HoundWorks

I agree with the shorter leashes. I use 4' and find it helps a lot. We recently got our second hound so there was a bit of a learning curve to walk them both without getting tangled or having one walk behind and the other in front. It was a circus act for the first week at least. Now I just walk and if someone is starting to drag behind I give a "let's go!" or tap my leg and that normally speeds them up. I found it was easy to start out walking on on my left and on on my right with the leash pulled short until our new grey learned that she couldn't stop and sniff every three feet. We look like pro's now only after a month, but we do walk our dogs 3-4 times a day since we don't have a backyard! Good luck, it just takes practice.

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I used to walk 2 all the time, and often 3 when we had a foster in the house.

 

I'm definitely NO trainer. But I've had 2 greys and 14 fosters. I first made sure each dog walked well for me. To do that, I walked in a small square in the backyard. Walk 10 steps, stop, turn, 10 steps, stop, turn. Repeat, repeat, repeat. Bores the heck otta them and they give up and just trudge along beside me, and learn to stop and turn when I do. Adding a new dog - I do the same thing. By themselves first, then with another dog. The first dog knows the drill, the newbie falls in line. If they get screwy when we leave the yard - it's immediately back to the boring backyard square. "Walking timeout drill".

 

I walk 2 dogs with one on each arm. I know that's not cool for everyone, but it works for me. I never give more than 4 feet of leash, less if we're walking just for exercise, although I don't expect a perfect "heel". Just one on each side. When somebody needs to do business - I stop - let out slack and let them. Then it's reel in an go. I walk FAST. I'm exercising too!

 

Of course - my dogs have a fenced yard where they do most of their business. Walks are for exercise and pleasure, not a multiple-time-per day necessity. I think if I did have to leash walk for potties - I'd probably use the same strategy - because it seems to work.

 

My Diana - who's been with us for about 5 years - will occasionally get screwy-excited when she goes for a leash walk if she hasn't had one in a while - and will lunge and jump. I'll immediately bring her back in the yard for "the time out of walking" and do the square. About 3 minutes of that (she knows the routine) and we're back out and about with her walking NICELY, and very happy to be out and about.

 

I'm not big enough, strong enough, or willing to be be embarassed enough - to take a dog far from my house - that acts screwy on-leash.

 

BTW- for a while - I had 55 lb. Diana, 90 lb. Sobe, and an 85 lb. foster that I walked together. I weigh 125, and I don't lift weights. You do the math - thank goodness they didn't or I could've been a skidmark on the road! I put the 2 big boys on my left arm together, separate leashes - 175 lbs of them. Diana on the right because the boys liked to be close to each other. They were all high-prey - that's all I have or foster - and we don't have sidewalks here - we walk through fields and pastures with WILDLIFE. I've never lost one or gotten pulled down. It's been close though!

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Hi just asking for some feedback,our hounds are doing much better walking ,not planting and if they do they start back up (thank God lol) now my concern is trying to walk them together its a circus act one stops the other keeps going then vice versa and since its so hot I don't want them strugggling and I don't want to sweat my but off lol, so i been walking individual and it works ,except when i take miami( boy ) out thyme (girl) whines but she is the main one who is difficult to walk together but she is fine alone? Do i keep this method up until they are more settled our goal is to walk them both at the same time and just keep trying to get them both out at the same time , now when me and my wife take one each they do good , I don't know if i'm doing something wrong or this is the process of adjusting getting very confused and yes sometimes very frustrating , but i'm doing good staying calm when with them. thanks Vinny

 

I would also highly recommend using verbal commands. I talk a lot when I'm walking my dogs. Stop. Wait. Left turn! Right turn! (okay, only one dog knew exactly what that meant, but the others learned we were going to change direction and would follow my lead). Let's go! is an important one - it means we're moving on, catch up and go. Nuh-uh (meaning no, you can't go sniff that we're WALKING on!) I never "trained" those words to my dogs. I just use them - and proceed. They all caught on very quickly. Keep the words SIMPLE. Use them consistantly. And always do the same thing when you say them. If you say "stop". STOP. Just stop. Stand there. Don't pull. Just wait. If you say "let's go" - take off walking. Don't pull the leash, but go! If you get resistance, slow, say "stop". Then do "let's go" again. They'll learn if it's simple.

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Guest SusanP

I've walked 4 dogs at a time for about 10 years now (5 different hounds plus a Labrador) using 6' leashes well-wrapped around my right wrist/hand. It works reasonably well, but not flawlessly, of course. The trick is to keep them wrapped fairly close to you and get them excited about moving. Jogging or trotting is a good way to get them fired up and moving together. I also find that plenty of "happy talk" immediately makes them speed up and focus more on the walk, and I keep up a happy chatter to them most of the time. Our worst problems are when I'm too distracted to talk to them. At one time I'd trick them by saying "no cat" or "no squirrel" even when there wasn't one, and that always got their attention and got them moving. One guy likes to stop dead in his tracks, creep over to something and sniff forever before peeing. I've found that counting to 10 loudly for him helps me not get impatient and signals to him that his time is limited. He generally pees and moves on before I get to 10 now, but if he doesn't, I say "All done", and take off at a trot.

My current combination of dogs, with two seniors aged 12 and 14, a very stubborn, leash-reactive 8-yr old and a shorter, 3-legged Labrador who thinks nothing of running under the hounds to sniff something of interest, is my most challenging group on walks, and I find that walking them in the street (when there are no cars--it's a quiet neighborhood) can help me get them moving more smoothly when things are falling apart, simply because there is less for them to sniff. Generally, I keep the ones who tend to pull in different directions wrapped closer, allowing the more cooperative dogs more leash, but not too much or they get their legs tangled. Did I mention their leashes are color-coded so I know which one to grap with an extra hand or wrap tighter when a problem develops?

When I have time, I take them all on a shorter walk (the seniors can't do more than about a mile) and then take the two younger dogs on a longer walk. My little Lab won't walk unless at least one other dogs is with us, but she hates to be left behind, so in the end, I'm always walking at least 2.

I do use hand signals to get them to turn, but I'll also say, "turn the corner", "In the street", "All done", "Let's go", "no cat!", and lots of "Good dogs!"

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Guest reneern120

i have 3 greys. i am able to walk all three of them at once but it took time and knowing the dogs. banana has just her collar and a 4 foot leash. tristan my male has a gentle leader and a 4 foot leash. he walks on my right by himself as my right arm is stronger and he can get leash agressive with some dogs. lilly my new girl walks with Banana on the left and has a gentle leader on as well. I am 5 feet tall and weight abou 110 so i an now very strong. i have had issue with liily and tristan both going crasy as once when so fool let her little dogs out without leashes to do their business in her yard and the thought it was more fun to come and bother my three. i was able to keep control on the situation and the little dogs did not end up a greyhound snack!! I think the key to walking multiple dogs is short leashes (4 foot ) gentle leaders(they are great for control) and being alert for things that will make you dog react!! THIS BEING SAID i KNOW DEWEY IN OCTOBER IS GOING TO BE A CHALLENGE WITH ALL THREE!! That being said TRISTAN is most likely going to wear is muzzle esp at the firehouse. HE USUALLY is a good boy however he has snapped at a couple of dogs. omg i think i need to start a new dewey topic!!

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Guest barkdogs

I walk 5 (3 greys, a border collie and a mini aussie) at once--7 if my friend Kevin is out of town and his 2 greys are staying with me. He has 2 brindles, and 2 of mine are brindle, so it's quite the collection of stripes!

 

My leashes are 3 to 4 feet long, which helps a lot as they don't get nearly as tangled. I set off at a good pace, after dogs have been in the yard for some (hopefully) potty action. I find that they tend to arrange themselves in a big circle around me. Works well and even if I am in the depths of the 'hood no one messes with me.

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