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4-H Obedience?


Guest Alysmom
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Guest Alysmom

Hi -- Homer's mom here. It has been two weeks today since he passed. I am still pretty much a wreck, I miss him so....

 

A new question. Yesterday my horseshoer told me about a local 4-H club for kids with dogs. My daughter is 11 and never really bonded that well with Homer. He was almost 90 pounds and she was only 3 when he came home -- he lovingly bowled her over all the time....:) so she clung more to her kitty (still does). I grew up in horse 4-H and learned a lot of really good things from the experience-- conformation, showmanship, how to give a demonstration, how to properly care for an animal, etc. I think 4-H would be a really good thing for her and I also think it would bond her to a dog and she would in the end wind up having a closer relationship with the dog.

 

Well, right now we have no dog, and I am in a quandry because I love hounds so very much personally. More than one dog is not an option... my husband doesnt like any animals at all, so it is a stretch just to get another dog. Homer would absolutely *not* have been the kind of dog who would have done the kid 4-H thing....let's just say, when you said "sit" he would lovingly look at you and either do nothing or lay down and yawn at you (it was hillarious!!) Not so much for a kid trying to learn in 4-H, I think it would do the opposite for her if all the other kids were doing the thing and she was straining to get the hound to cooperate!!!

 

Cat 4-H isnt the same (plus her cat is 16, too old for all that)..... I think the dog 4-H might be a good thing. I am in a quandry.... Would this be a good thing for a hound, or am I better thinking about another breed :( I am trying to remember that even though Homer was *my* dog, it might be best if any new dog we get become the family's dog....

 

Any ideas??

 

Thanks!

Julie -- Missing Homer so bad it still hurts....

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Guest amethyst

I was recently at an AKC Obedience trial. An experienced trainer/handler said that in general it takes 2 years to put a CD title on a sighthound compared to 3 months with a retriever or herding dog.

 

I've only had one greyhound and am new to dog training. My experience has been that it has taken us 2 full years to finally get our AKC Beginner Novice title. This involved going to classes regularly for two years and short daily training sessions. She's really good at the active things like recalls and jumping.

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I'm not familiar with what 4-H requires as far as obedience, but Greyhounds are definitely trainable - just some more so than others. I taught the boy I'm waiting on to sit, shake, come, do some basic agility, among other things - and he's still racing!

 

Speak with your adoption group about what your plans are for your new dog. They should know their dogs well enough to recommend a greyhound who is food motivated and willing to please. :)

| Rachel | Dewty, Trigger, and Charlotte | Missing Dazzle, Echo, and Julio |

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Learn what your greyhound's life was like before becoming part of yours!
"The only thing better than the cutest kitty in the world is any dog." -Daniel Tosh

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Many many moons ago, when I got my first grey, we did obedience for 2 years. By the time I stopped, Pharaoh was "ring ready". (Actually, he was ready before that, but we were having fun.) We didn't go any further because there were no obedience competitions within my reach that were held indoors, and I was afraid to take him to a show that wasn't enclosed. Anyway, my point is that there are greys out there who would work out for you and your daughter, maybe a small girl? The bigger question would be does she want to do this?

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Guest Alysmom

Many many moons ago, when I got my first grey, we did obedience for 2 years. By the time I stopped, Pharaoh was "ring ready". (Actually, he was ready before that, but we were having fun.) We didn't go any further because there were no obedience competitions within my reach that were held indoors, and I was afraid to take him to a show that wasn't enclosed. Anyway, my point is that there are greys out there who would work out for you and your daughter, maybe a small girl? The bigger question would be does she want to do this?

 

Hi -- Yes -- that is the exciting part, She says she thinks it would be fun....

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Hi, I'm sorry about Homer.

I have done lots of obedience with my Labs, but not with my Greys. I did see a Greyhound in an obedience show one, she was really good! She was at an advanced level so had to sit and stay for 5 minutes with her owner out of sight. It was even an outdoor show!

From personal experience I would go for a smaller Grey, one that can do the sit a bit easier. Our female is 55 lb and she can sit without any problem. Our males, on the other hand don't sit, and they are 75 lb or more. (Our Angel Jamey did sit, but he was small for a male, about 67 lb). So what I guess I'm saying is that Greyhound size may make a difference in how well it might do in obedience. Having a motivated Greyhound would also be necessary.

 

Good luck, with care you should be able to get a Greyhound that will fill both your 'needs'.

Tin and Michael and Lucas, Picasso, Hero, Oasis, Galina, Neizan, Enzo, Salvo and Noor the Galgos.
Remembering Bridge Angel Greyhounds: Tosca, Jamey, Master, Diego, and Ambi; plus Angel Galgos Jules, Marco and Baltasar.

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Guest KsFrets

I did 4-H dog obedience, as a kid, over 40 years ago with a high spirited Dalmatian. We did fine and what I learned I still use today with the greyhounds. By all means go for it with a Greyhound.

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Guest mom2hounds

My son will be joining 4H with our beagle/coonhound mix. I don't think our current greyhound would enjoy it. I have two friends who have taken their hounds to obedience classes and passed their CGC tests.

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When you go to adopt again, let the group know you are looking for a higher energy, happy go lucky, people loving greyhound for 4-H. There are many greyhounds who would LOVE to have the special bond that would come from a little girl fussing over him/her - I was a horse 4-H leader for several years when we lived on our farm .... and the bond the develops from children working one on one with animals is amazing!

 

I have found every one of my greyhounds to be very trainable. I do not see where there would be any issues training the dog to do obedience. Mine have sailed through their CgC's & TDI therapy dog certifications. I have found my greyhounds to be extremely smart and willing to learn.

 

You should check out the website for Never Say Never Greyhounds - they have shown the world how trainable these dogs are!

If you emailed them, I am very sure they would be happy to tell you what attributes you should be looking for in your next greyhound - if your daughter aspires to do agility as well as obedience / rally with her new greyhound.

 

4-H is a wonderful program!

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CORY and CRICKET - Solitary Tremble & CASPER - Pj's Mia Farrow
* With CAPT. GUS - Solitary Trigger, RAINY - Peach Rain, PUP - Red Zepher, DOC - CTW Fort Sumpter
and MAX - Shiowa's Silver Maxamillion / Afghan .... all waiting at the bridge

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If you and your daughter both want a dog, I'd go for it.

 

I wouldn't let size, gender, etc. influence your decision. My Gidget is a big, long-bodied girl. She has no problem sitting. Equally, angel Batman was a very tall male. He *looked* awkward sitting, but he was perhaps my most reliable dog for the 4+-minute sit-stays.

 

We don't show but have been to many obedience classes over the years. I've personally found the off-the-track greyhounds to be a bit slower getting started in training than working breeds. But once they understand the notion of "I say this, you do that," they're great and eager learners.

Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
We miss Reko Batman (Trouper Zeke x Marque Louisiana), 11/15/95-6/29/06, Rocco the thistledown whippet, 04/29/93-10/14/08, Reko Zema (Mo Kick x Reko Princess), 8/16/98-4/18/10, the most beautiful girl in the whole USA, my good egg Joseph aka Won by a Nose (Oneco Cufflink x Buy Back), 09/22/2003-03/01/2013, and our gentle sweet Gidget (Digitizer, Dodgem by Design x Sobe Mulberry), 1/29/2006-11/22/2014, gone much too soon. Never forgetting CJC's Buckshot, 1/2/07-10/25/10.

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I taught 4H dog obedience and had many state champions and quite a few that went on to get their AKC CDs. Because I came from a working dog background (danes & dobes) I (notice the I) had a bit of a problem with hounds in the groups. Today, I wouldn't. I would follow the advice to get a willing to please greyhound. Tell the group what you want to do.

 

Also, keep in mind this greyhound will hopefully live past your daughter's time at home, so don't just get one for her. Must be for both of you :)

 

I have had both those who would have done well in obedience and not so well :lol

 

I would visit the 4H group you want to join and see how they train. Also keep in mind, off lead with a retired racer may or may not be possible. Some never lose the "get the bunny" click in their head.

Diane & The Senior Gang

Burpdog Biscuits

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This is just my experience, with my dog. Katie came to me a terrified, spook of a greyhound. It's taken time and patience, but once she had the "ah hah!" clicker moment, she has been a treat to train. Knows a lot of tricks. Now, I'm not interested in straight obedience, so I don't know how I would do with her in a class, and I have a trainer that is very much a "go at your own pace" kind of person, so it all works for me. Having said that, the little rat terrier that followed me home is a much faster learner.

 

So, I do think you need to go and watch some of the sessions and see what is going to be expected. If you find the right greyhound, you may not have any issues. On the other hand, there are definitely breeds that would be easier to work with, and if the group is one where you WILL be expected to have your dog at the same level as everyone else at the same time, it may be best to go with one of the other breeds. I'd also want to know whether they are corrective or positive reinforcement trainers, since that would influence whether I even joined the group or not.

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My blog about helping Katie learn to be a more normal dog: http://katies-journey-philospher77.blogspot.com/

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When you go to adopt again, let the group know you are looking for a higher energy, happy go lucky, people loving greyhound for 4-H. There are many greyhounds who would LOVE to have the special bond that would come from a little girl fussing over him/her - I was a horse 4-H leader for several years when we lived on our farm .... and the bond the develops from children working one on one with animals is amazing!

 

I have found every one of my greyhounds to be very trainable. I do not see where there would be any issues training the dog to do obedience. Mine have sailed through their CgC's & TDI therapy dog certifications. I have found my greyhounds to be extremely smart and willing to learn.

 

You should check out the website for Never Say Never Greyhounds - they have shown the world how trainable these dogs are!

If you emailed them, I am very sure they would be happy to tell you what attributes you should be looking for in your next greyhound - if your daughter aspires to do agility as well as obedience / rally with her new greyhound.

 

4-H is a wonderful program!

 

excellent suggestion, make sure your adoption group knows exactly what your intentions are and they should be able to find the right pup for you. it's tons of fun and i personally LOVE watching 4H kids handle their animals- it's the best!!!! from my personal experience young males are made for activities like obedience and agility- lots of energy, lots of love and they really seem to bond w/ their handlers.

 

i've worked salukis, terriers and greys in obedience. yeah, the terriers by far are the easiest, salukis the most difficult.

Edited by cleptogrey
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