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Heat Stroke


Guest kkaiser104
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Guest kkaiser104

I tried just doing a search but couldn't find exactly what I was looking for, so forgive me if there's another topic about this!

 

Tonight, my roommate took Teddi for a jog (she's doing couch to 5k and has been taking him with her). I didn't even think about the heat, and it's right around 80 degrees with a nice little breeze. When he came back I was worried about him--he was panting VERY hard. I gave him a little water and washed him down with a wet towel and then draped it over him, and now (30 minutes later) he's comfortably laying down relaxed on our floor.

 

My question is: how long is it normal for greys to pant, and when should you be worried? How long is too long for him to pant after exercising?

 

BTW: Teddi is a 2.5 yo brindle male, if that makes a difference

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Guest widowcali

If he was fine 30 minutes after the water and wet towel, he should be fine.

 

But I live in AZ and have a black greyhound who likes to sunbathe :dunno . I'm sure someone with way more knowledge on doggy pysiology will give you particulars, but if they have been panting hard for a while (and I have already done the cool water and wet towel off thing) I usually grab another cold towel and wash their pits. I then lay the wet towel on them until they either stop panting or it dries.

 

Pretty much, if they get heatstressed, a combo of these two procedures gets them back into comfy roach mode.

 

But I also keep their outside time VERY limited in our hot season. I kick them out for about 20 minutes in the early early morning (I get up around 5 am and it is only about 80 then). Then they get very very short potty turns in the yard periodically thru the day. There are 2 water bowels in the yard that are changed several times a day (grannilady works nights so she is home during the day) and a constantly changed water bowl inside. I also have 2 fans pointed at their beds in the coolest part of the house. Between all of these my senior girlies seem to do very well during the hottest parts of monsoon season.

 

Now ask me how they like our Arizona winters compared to those Georgia winters they had to suffer through... :hehe :hehe :hehe

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Guest kkaiser104

I guess my question is--if he ever did have heat stroke, when should I call the vet? I've never had a dog get heat stroke, and I'm VERY vigilant about water and cool-downs, but I just want to be prepared if it were to ever happen.

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HEAT STROKE SYMPTOMS INCLUDE:

 

*A rapid or erratic heartbeat/pulse

 

*Rapid breathing, or struggling for breath

 

*Exaggerated panting, or the sudden stopping of panting

 

*Increased, excessive, loud, heaving, irregular panting or the sudden stopping of panting

 

*A very high body temperature - usually, cell damage begins to occur at body temperatures over 106 degrees

 

*Excessive drooling, or frothing at the mouth

 

*Dark red gums

 

*Vomiting

 

*Barking or whining

 

*Anxiety or agitation

 

*Dizziness

 

*Confusion

 

*Incoordination - stumbling and/or trouble standing or walking

 

*An anxious, vacant, or staring&#160;exp<b></b>ression

 

*Listlessness or weakness

 

*Shaking or seizures

 

*Collapse or unconsciousness

 

Other signs of heat stroke can include some or all of the following:

 

*Dry mouth and nose

 

*Lack of urine production

 

*Weakness and muscle tremors

 

*Dryness and redness&#160;(or dull grayish-pink or blue) of the inside of the tongue, mouth, lips and gums&#160;and gums - OR -

 

*Drooling and excess salivation

 

*Glazed eyes and/or dilated pupils

 

*Difficulty standing or walking

 

vomiting and diarrhea (sp)

 

 

Seek immediate medical attention

 

Personally unless a dog is in top physical condition, 5k runs are a bit much for a dog in the summer heat. Early morning or after sunset maybe but this summer has been brutal in the south and I think it's risky to exercise a dog that much at this time of the year.

Edited by JillysFullHouse

Judy, mom to Darth Vader, Bandita, And Angel

Forever in our hearts, DeeYoGee, Dani, Emmy, Andy, Heart, Saint, Valentino, Arrow, Gee, Bebe, Jilly Bean, Bullitt, Pistol, Junior, Sammie, Joey, Gizmo, Do Bee

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Guest kkaiser104

HEAT STROKE SYMPTOMS INCLUDE:

 

*A&#160;rapid or erratic heartbeat/pulse

 

*Rapid breathing, or struggling for breath

 

*Exaggerated panting, or the sudden stopping of panting

 

*Increased, excessive,&#160;loud,&#160;heaving, irregular panting or the sudden stopping of panting

 

*A very&#160;high body temperature - usually, cell damage begins to occur at body temperatures over 106 degrees

 

*Excessive drooling, or frothing at the mouth

 

*Dark red gums

 

*Vomiting

 

*Barking or whining

 

*Anxiety or agitation

 

*Dizziness

 

*Confusion

 

*Incoordination - stumbling and/or trouble standing or walking

 

*An anxious, vacant, or staring&#160;expression

 

*Listlessness or weakness

 

*Shaking or seizures

 

*Collapse or unconsciousness

 

Other signs of heat stroke can include some or all of the following:

 

*Dry mouth and nose

 

*Lack of urine production

 

*Weakness and muscle tremors

 

*Dryness and redness&#160;(or dull grayish-pink or blue) of the inside of the tongue, mouth, lips and gums&#160;and gums - OR -

 

*Drooling and excess salivation

 

*Glazed eyes and/or dilated pupils

 

*Difficulty standing or walking

 

vomiting and diarrhea (sp)

 

 

Seek immediate medical attention

 

Personally unless a dog is in top physical condition, 5k runs are a bit much for a dog in the summer heat. Early morning or after sunset maybe but this summer has been brutal in the south and I think it's risky to exercise a dog that much at this time of the year.

 

Thanks for the list of symptoms. To clarify--this wasn't a 5k. Couch to 5k is a program that works a person up to running a 5k. The jog itself was 20 minutes, alternating 60 seconds of jogging, 90 seconds of walking. He wouldn't run a 5k for all of the treats in the world :)

 

http://www.coolrunni...2/2_3/181.shtml

Edited by kkaiser104
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Heat stroke in dogs (and people) can be very quickly fatal and is difficult to reverse. You would want to get him to an e-vet immediately. Remember, they don't sweat like we do, so the opportunity to perspire and cool down is much different. Here is a decent article: http://pets.webmd.com/dogs/heat-stroke-dehydration-dogs and they are quite a few others if you google heat stroke in dogs.

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If he suffers heat stroke I would bet he would die. That is why it is so very important to prevent it. Heat exhaustion can be critical too. You have to be very careful with greyhounds. Humidity comes into play as well. For example my first hound Ivy could jog with me 1-3miles even in the summer under veterinary supervision and with extra electrolytes and bicarb added to her diet. Another hound of mine Goldie was hanging around in the park with me-NOT exercising even- one 80 degree evening shortly after I got him. Very suddenly he seemed to deteriorate in front of my eyes. I deceided not to take any chances and take him home and when I got him home only ~10 minutes later and checked his temp it was 107!!!!!!!!! I knew he would die before he got to any vet and that his only hope was immediate cooling so into the tub with cold water showering over him. By the grace of God his temp immediately started retreating and he amazingly recovered without incident. Cellular death is known to occur at 108-that's how close he came. He simply could not tolerate ANY heat-even 80 degrees in the shade was too much. For the rest of his life I had to insure that he was never exposed to any heat. Yet another hound my soulmate Slim easily ran 5 or more miles with me in the summer and was unfazed by it and ready for more. It all depends on the dog. From what you describe I don't think I would allow him to get that hot again. Sometimes theres a very thin line or tipping point between survival and death when dealing with heat. a lot of dogs bite the dust due to heat. Its not worth taking the chance. Greyhounds are ultra sensitive to begin with re:heat; too risky IMO. BTW immmediate cooling is essential to survival. You have to decide if there is even time to get them to the vet or if their only hope is for you to do the best you can. Just another reason its better not to take the chance to begin with and therefore just avoid that senario totally.JMO.

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Guest greybookends

I cannot think of the name of the condition but it occurs as a result of over exertion and heat. Basically what happens is the hound goes into sudden renal failure and it is deadly. I am sure someone hear knows what I am talking about. In this heat you cannot be over cautious.

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You've gotten a lot of good advise here. You also did the correct thing.

 

So just as extra info. For heat exhaustion or stroke, you want to cool the body down. Remove the dog (or human) from direct sunlight or heat source. Do not use ice. It cools too quickly. Or It can also close the blood flow to the extremities causing the opposite effect and not allowing the core to cool down. (decreased circulation). Apply cool damp towels to the armpits and groin area where the arteries are closest to the skin. Do not use alcohol on the skin to cool down. That's a wives tale. It closes the skin circulatory system, keeping the core hot..

Allow sips of water. Too much water to drink and too cold will cause stomach cramps.

 

transport to the vets.

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If you suspect heat stroke, you need to immediately take the dog's temperature rectally. If it's elevated, begin cooling the dog down immediately by running cool water over him, focusing on the legs, chest, and belly. Take the temperature rectally periodically and when you reach 103, stop cooling and get the dog to the vet. You need to stop at that point because you can overcool the dog and it's of paramount importance that you cool the dog BEFORE leaving for the vet or it may be too late.

 

Also note that if your dog has suffered heat stroke, or even a heat "episode" where cooling hte dog was sufficient, he is likely to be more prone to another episode in the future.

 

FYI, using wet cloths or towels is not the best idea as they warm up quickly and then trap body heat.

 

I've gone through this with Zuri and it's no joke. Glad your dog is okay.

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Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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