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Future Of A Crate-Chewer's Teeth?


Guest issy
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Guest issy

Before Enzo came to us a few years back, apparently he was a crate chewer. He is missing enamel on the backs of his canines, and his bottom front toofies are worn down to the gum. The vets haven't made any comments about it, even when I brought it up, and he is a champion chow-hound and they don't appear to bother him. We brush his teeth daily. He is no longer crated, and anything he chews (raw quarters and backs, etc.) is of course chewed with his molars.

 

Few questions, though. What might eventually be the fate of his teeth? Will these need to be pulled? He's 4. If they aren't pulled, can they lead to infection? Should I worry about it now? Anyone with experience have some words of wisdom?

 

Thanks!

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All 3 of my males are this way & it's was two passed at 10&11 with no issues. Swoop my current is 6 1/2 with no issues

Cassie: Pikes Clara Bell Swoop: My Man Swoop

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At Murray's first dental with us, he had three of his four canine teeth pulled. The teeth were cracked to the roots from previous years of crate chewing. An abscess was also forming under one of those canines. We had no idea that these canines were in such bad shape until the vet called us during the dental. Under anesthesia, the vet could fully assess the health of Murray's teeth.

 

Murray had two previous homes before we adopted him at age five. We don't crate him here.

 

Murray is on the left in this picture. You can see his canine nubs compared to Bee Wiseman's canines.

5353586656_5b5fc8d684_z.jpg

Edited by 45MPHK9

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Tricia with Kaia the wolfhound-schnauzer mix
Always missing Murray MaldivesBee Wiseman, River, Hopper, and 
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The best time to assess those teeth is when he's under anesthesia were the teeth can be probed for pockets etc and he could have a set a oral rads done. Most times if the pulp isn't exposed they just need to be monitored. Sadly, this is not an uncommon finding in our retired hounds.

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Guest mountain4greys

Our second dog came to us at 3 years old. No cracked teeth, but the front are worn down to the gums. She's 10 now and doing great with no problems.

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Bumper was our crate chewer and had his canines and all teeth forward were pulled this past Spring, at 7.5 years old. Like Enzo, he had only nubs for front teeth.

 

Dental x-rays showed his canines were cracked and so worn, the likelihood of future infection was strong so the extractions were preventative. I don't know what the center part of the tooth is called, but when that dies (as in Bumper's case), it retracts / recedes, leaving a channel of softer material that eventually decays, exposing a route for bacteria to make their way to the root, causing other issues / problems / infections down the road. Bumper's incisors were fine except the protective elements of the teeth were completely eroded and again, the possibility of future issues was the main reason for their removal.

 

As this was preventative, it was a very difficult decision. There was no burning platform but with Bumper's other health issues, we wanted to do the surgery when he was young(er) and healthi(er) than at a time of an emergency or at an advanced age.

 

In your situation, it sounds like there is no immediate burning platform so I'd wait. If he has to go under for any other reason in the future, dental rads may be a good idea. Will let you know exactly what the teeth look like and you can better manage your next steps from there.

 

I'm pleased to hear other hounds have done just fine with nubs.

 

Our dogs are raw fed as well and Bumper can still chomp bone with the best of them. He has a little trouble picking up the food sometimes but eventually gets it. He's not very good at tug-o-war anymore and always gets a pass on wearing a muzzle :P .

Doe's Bruciebaby Doe's Bumper

Derek

Follow my Ironman journeys and life with dogs, cats and busy kids: A long road

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My sisters Pearl and Diamond both were crate chewers. Diamond ended up losing almost all her teeth, Pearl had most of her teeth. Both were worn down to the gumline (Pearl's front were the worst).

 

They passed at age 12 to cancer. So...it could go any way. The teeth might bother him. Might not.

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Guest Fasave

I have a crate chewer. When I was fostering him, he fell down my deck stairs and took a face plant on a piece of flagstone cracking a front canine in half (I broke him so I kept him :-)). My vet recommended a vet dentist to do the removal. They did a full set of x-rays and while he was under, they removed one other molar. The dentist said if I continue to brush and care for the teeth, he may never need another dental. I would definitely make sure that you have a dental performed by a vet that does dental x-rays as it is the best way to know the health of all the teeth.

Edited by Fasave
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George was a crate chewer. The only comment I've ever gotten from the vet is that he has SPECTACULAR dental health "for a Greyhound" because he has NO tartar. I do not brush his teeth, and aside from the dental he had when I first got him (he did not do well with the anesthesia), his teeth have had NO attention other than bones.

 

His lower front teeth are pretty much gone. His his upper front teeth are also. His molars, what they actually use to eat with, are terrific.

 

I don't worry about it. There is no sign of pain or infection, no bad breath, and my vet thinks they're fine.


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Guest issy

Thank you all for your replies! Very interesting and informative to see the full spectrum of experience. Thank you for reassuring me :) I'll keep an eye on his teeth and next time he needs anything done, I'll have them evaluated as preventative measures!

 

At Murray's first dental with us, he had three of his four canine teeth pulled. The teeth were cracked to the roots from previous years of crate chewing. An abscess was also forming under one of those canines. We had no idea that these canines were in such bad shape until the vet called us during the dental. Under anesthesia, the vet could fully assess the health of Murray's teeth.

 

Murray had two previous homes before we adopted him at age five. We don't crate him here.

 

Murray is on the left in this picture. You can see his canine nubs compared to Bee Wiseman's canines.

5353586656_5b5fc8d684_z.jpg

 

Beautiful picture, cute nubbies!

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Loca was a crate chewer so I never crated her. Her teeth were also nubs in front. She didn't really have any dental problems.

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Xavi the galgo and Peter the cat. Missing Iker the galgo ?-Feb.9/19, Treasure (USS Treasure) April 12/01-May 6/13, Phoenix (Hallo Top Son) Dec.14/99-June 4/11 and Loca (Reko Swahili) Oct.9/95 - June 1/09, Allen the boss cat, died late November, 2021, age 19.

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