Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Guest SusanP

Staining On Facial Fur

Recommended Posts

Guest SusanP

My beautiful senior Zippy Zappy (14) licks her face and has dark, reddish brown stains around her mouth that won't come off. I wash her face daily to get the crusties off these spots, but the stains remain on her lovely white muzzle. Does anyone have a way to fix this? Peroxide didn't help and our vet told us to avoid using it anyway. Vet suggested the cleaner for contact lenses, since it removes proteins, but that really didn't do anything. Do we just have to live with it? Do many senior hounds tend to get this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Wasserbuffel

I would look into that tear stain remover they make for little white fluffies. I have no idea if it's safe to use that close to a mouth, but it's supposed to work really well in whitening up stained fur.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This will be interesting....my Desi has the same stains around his mouth.


Blessed is the person who has earned the love of an old dog.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paul is a white dog with 4 teeth. He had dark stains around his mouth. I used peroxide, baby wipes, and shampoos. Nothing worked. I bought OPTIMEX, on line. It "elimiates unsightly tear stains from eye, face and feet." It really works. It takes about two weeks, but it does work. You add a small amount of the powder to food. It costs about $14.


Irene Ullmann w/Flying Odin in Lower Delaware
Angels Brandy, John E, American Idol, Paul, Fuzzy and Shine
Handcrafted Greyhound and Custom Clocks http://www.houndtime.com
Zoom Doggies-Racing Coats for Racing Greyhounds

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that's part of the beauty in older dogs. I don't know why you'd want to put chemicals on their face.


Introducing Tessie, PK's Cat Island 12/9/13
Jackson the Airedale 12/12/05
Forever missing Grace 2/18/03 - 1/19/13 (RT's Grace, 18156/23B) and Fenway 10/10/06 - 9/25/16 (not registered)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest greytchloe

My senior Chava has the same issue; I think it is from her canned food cause that is when it started. My vet said to wipe her mouth with a wet facecloth after she eats, and most importantly dry it completely. This has helped a lot, doesn't erase it completely but it is much better. Also interested to hear what others say...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know that it's necessarily a senior dog issue. I think it just depends on the make up of their saliva, which probably does shift with time/age. Summit used to get those stains around his mouth ALL the time. But for the last 6 months or so it's been almost non-existent. I think the change in diet and having his teeth brushed every day has probably done something to alter the flora in his mouth and now no more staining. Previously I had tried peroxide, those pads for tear/saliva staining for white fluffies... nothing worked well.


Kristie and the Apex Agility Greyhounds: Kili (ATChC AgMCh Lakilanni Where Eagles Fly RN IP MSCDC MTRDC ExS Bronze ExJ Bronze ) and Kenna (Lakilanni Kiss The Sky RN MADC MJDC AGDC AGEx AGExJ). Waiting at the Bridge: Retired racer Summit (Bbf Dropout) May 5, 2005-Jan 30, 2019

Like us on Facebook!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest HHHounds

Candyman had that and I had to wash and dry his mouth a lot!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it has something to do with the make up of their saliva also. My Joey's fur turn colors in the areas where he cleans himself, especially around his belly.


Judy, mom to Do Bee, Bandita, Angel and Gizmo

Forever in our hearts, DeeYoGee, Dani, Emmy, Andy, Heart, Saint, Valentino, Arrow, Gee, Bebe, Jilly Bean, Bullitt, Pistol, Junior, Sammie, Joey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never worry about it. :dunno


gallery_12867_3348_20333.jpg
~Beth, with a crazy mixed crew of misfits.
~ Forever and Always missing and loving Steak, Carmen, Ivy, Isis, and Madi.
Don't cry because it's ended, Smile because it happened.
Before you judge me, try to keep an open mind, not everyone likes your taste.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest jettcricket

I would look into that tear stain remover they make for little white fluffies. I have no idea if it's safe to use that close to a mouth, but it's supposed to work really well in whitening up stained fur.

As Jett and Cricket got older they also got staining around their mouth. I did try and use the tear stain remover...it helped a little bit. Something must change in their saliva as they age. I just learned to live with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a 13 year old and her mouth, chin, hair are perfectly white. She eats her kibble, with some canned food, and no stains. Her teeth are great. Maybe that has something to do with it. I clean teeth and brush them also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest june

I quit worrying about the stains and just wipe her face daily to keep it clean. But she really hates for me to clean her face :lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Liz

Mamma Tess had those stains and I have noticed that Darby is getting them, I don't worry about it, as long as they are healthy and happy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest BrianRke

Daytona will be 11 this year. His mouth is perfectly white with no stains. Frank is 3 and always has a crusty mouth. I clean it often but now it is a little stained.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never worry about it. :dunno

:nod Me, too, no worries. All I worry about is keeping everyone is healthy.

 

Well, I wouldn't either, except that Sid is a therapy dog and it looks dirty. :blush He's only 8 years old, but he has the beginnings of this problem.

 

Jim didn't have it - he was white and brindle. Susan - white dog - didn't have it. Jack (fawn) had it in spades. Renie (brindle) had a little, at ten years. Sid has it beginning (fawn) and Jeffie, ten years old and black-with-a-grey-face, only has a very little. I'm with the 'depends on the make-up of the saliva' people!

 

I'm going to look into Optimex - thanks for the tip, Houndtime!


GTAvatar-2015_zpsb0oqcimj.jpg

The plural of anecdote is not data

Brambleberry Greyhounds My Etsy Shop

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, darn it.

 

Seems that tylosin (the active ingredient in Optimex) is an antibiotic. Overdose causes salivation and defaecation with mild pyelonephritis in dogs, but the worst thing about it is that even at lower doses, over time, it produces antibiotic resistance to streptococci bacteria. I'm not willing to do that, so Sid will have to keep his stained fur. :(

 

In studies in human volunteers, there was no evidence of the

emergence of cross-resistance to therapeutically important

antibiotics, but volunteers given oral doses of 20 mg of tylosin

daily for 6 months showed an increase in the number of resistant

streptococci.

 

Source

 

It's a really, really bad idea to give antibiotics long term when an animal isn't unwell, but it's even worse to give under the therapeutic dose.


GTAvatar-2015_zpsb0oqcimj.jpg

The plural of anecdote is not data

Brambleberry Greyhounds My Etsy Shop

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, darn it.

 

Seems that tylosin (the active ingredient in Optimex) is an antibiotic. Overdose causes salivation and defaecation with mild pyelonephritis in dogs, but the worst thing about it is that even at lower doses, over time, it produces antibiotic resistance to streptococci bacteria. I'm not willing to do that, so Sid will have to keep his stained fur. :(

 

In studies in human volunteers, there was no evidence of the

emergence of cross-resistance to therapeutically important

antibiotics, but volunteers given oral doses of 20 mg of tylosin

daily for 6 months showed an increase in the number of resistant

streptococci.

 

Source

 

It's a really, really bad idea to give antibiotics long term when an animal isn't unwell, but it's even worse to give under the therapeutic dose.

 

 

Well, I had no idea. Thanks for the info.


Irene Ullmann w/Flying Odin in Lower Delaware
Angels Brandy, John E, American Idol, Paul, Fuzzy and Shine
Handcrafted Greyhound and Custom Clocks http://www.houndtime.com
Zoom Doggies-Racing Coats for Racing Greyhounds

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Bean_Scotch

Personally---I don't worry about cosmetic stuff...bald buts, blackheads on chest, stainining on fur...As long as they are healthy and happy I'm fine with whatever they look like. It's part of the breed and well, it will either go away all on it's own or I'll live with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, darn it.

 

Seems that tylosin (the active ingredient in Optimex) is an antibiotic. Overdose causes salivation and defaecation with mild pyelonephritis in dogs, but the worst thing about it is that even at lower doses, over time, it produces antibiotic resistance to streptococci bacteria. I'm not willing to do that, so Sid will have to keep his stained fur. :(

 

 

 

Well, I had no idea. Thanks for the info.

 

I'm not surprised - they hid it very well and I had to do a lot of digging to find out. I hate it when companies do that. It's illegal to sell antibiotic products without a prescription in the UK, and I thought it was in the US as well, but they don't care so long as they make a quick profit. :angry:

 

Interestingly, while it is openly for sale on the US Amazon site, it's not listed here in the UK. Probably they couldn't get a licence.


GTAvatar-2015_zpsb0oqcimj.jpg

The plural of anecdote is not data

Brambleberry Greyhounds My Etsy Shop

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Judy thank you for digging out that piece of information. The way they described it in the description it sounded like it was doing a good thing and not just cosmetic wise. I did have an underlying fear though it would have harmful effects like the stuff that is made to give to dogs that prevents their urine from turning grass yellow, but damages their kidneys.

As far as worrying about cosmetic things, for most things I don't, but somehow I feel people think I'm not taking proper care of Beanie when she has a stained face. Like I can't keep her clean.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...