Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Guest pennmorgan

What To Do After An Attack?

Recommended Posts

Guest pennmorgan

While we were out walking yesterday in downtown LA, my five year old hound Olivia was randomly attacked by a pit bull that escaped its owner's leash. The attack was completely unprovoked - the dog ran at us from across the street and made a bee line for Olivia's neck. It was the most traumatic experience I can ever remember, frankly. She had some surgery this morning and got sutures in five places. She'll survive, but I'm just worried about what I should expect when she comes home in a few days. Do you have any thoughts or tips? I'm particularly wondering ...

 

1) Is there anything I can expect in terms of her reaction to other dogs?

2) How can I show her again that I am the pack leader and will protect her? Immediately after the attack when she was screaming, she gave me this look like "Why didn't you save me?" It was really one of the worst moments of my life.

3) How can I protect us from future similar incidents? Is there something I can carry to protect us? Or something I can do if I see another pit bull charging at us?

4) There are LOTS of idiot owners who think it's OK to have off leash dogs in this area - how do you suggest handling these people? I'm really going to have to resist the urge to hurl obscenities at them for being irresponsible pieces of #*$&.

 

I am really shaken and scared for how this attack will affect my sweet little girl. Any thoughts or suggestions would really be appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm so sorry this happened to you. I'm glad your girl is going to be okay. I don't have much advice because it hasn't happened to me. My thoughts are to act as normally as possible because she will pick up on your anxiety. I think I would carry some Direct Stop, I think that's what it's called, or some mace and a big stick just in case it happens again.


Judy, mom to Do Bee, Bandita, Angel and Gizmo

Forever in our hearts, DeeYoGee, Dani, Emmy, Andy, Heart, Saint, Valentino, Arrow, Gee, Bebe, Jilly Bean, Bullitt, Pistol, Junior, Sammie, Joey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm so sorry for what Olivia had to endure. :(


4894718087_9910a46faa_d.jpg

Tricia with Hopper the terrier mix and Kaia the wolfhound-schnauzer mix
Always missing Murray MaldivesBee Wiseman, River, and Holly Oaks Holly our perfect hounds gone too soon
Walls turned sideways are bridges. -Angela Davis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This has never happened to me, so no advice on your specific questions, but do you intend to go after the owner of the pitt?


GTsiggy_zps0481d543.jpg

Lisa with Finnegan (Nina's Fire Fly) and Sage (Gil's Selma). Always missing Roscoe
www.popdogdesigns.net pop art prints, custom portraits and collars

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's never happened to me, either, so I can't answer #1 and #2. But as to #3, I carry a spray that's called SprayShield, and it's under pressure like mace, but it contains Citronella. It's designed to ward off other dogs. I also recently read Patricia McConnell's blog about a technique that works surprisingly well: tossing handfuls of treats at the approaching dog: http://www.theotherendoftheleash.com/it-works-how-to-stop-an-approaching-dog-in-an-emergency. Of course no guarantee. There are also good tips and comments from her readers at the bottom. As to #4: I hear you and I wish I had an answer. Same experience here.

 

Lastly, I'm, too, very sorry you two had to go through this. This is one of a dog owner's worst nightmares. I hope Olivia will be able to quickly get over her trauma.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm so sorry that you both had to go through that. How horrible. I'm glad that her injuries were not more serious.

 

 

Try to not be anxious or apprehensive or she will pick up on your concerns. Keep a positive and confident attitude and carry some sort of defense. My local animal control officer suggested that I carry a stick or light weight pipe and if needed, to tap any offending dog on the snout as it is an extremely sensitive area. So I got a piece of PVC about 2.5 feet long that I carry with us and I am not afraid to use it. . Just give me the pipe and my dogs and off we go. Carry a cell phone too so you can call for help and take photos as needed.

 

I hope that you reported the incident to the Animal Control office so this dog's behavior is recorded. That's probably your best defense to keep reporting idiots and their dogs.

 

I don't think dogs hold a grudge, so please try not to continue feeling guilty. Your girl will keep loving you smile.gif


Jody, Leah & Jimmie
Tavasci%2520august%2520sunset%2520%2528C
You left us much, much too soon Lima & Chip :brokenheart

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am so sorry this happened to you and Olivia, but glad to hear Olivia will be OK. After this happened to us, Fletcher, who wasn't great with other breeds before, became much more leash aggressive. Some dogs become more fearful. The best thing you can do for your dog is to try and have a positive, upbeat attitude, and not tense up when you see other dogs. I sat "try", because I know how difficult that is :rolleyes: I think a stick is probably the best defense, one long enough to keep some distance between the other dog and you (if possible) The bad thing about sprays is, they can blow back in your face, or your dog's. I have yelled, stomped my feet, even thrown a full bag of poop at one dog :lol You do whatever it takes, but, as you know, everything happens so fast!

 

I suppose it is too much to hope the other owner offered to pay your vet bills :unsure

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So very sorry you and your sweetheart have to go through this! It's terrifying.

 

I will kick any dog who gets within range. I'll ask questions later.


SummerGreytalkSignatureResized-1.jpg

Lisa B.

My beautiful Summer - to her forever home May 1, 2010 Summer

Certified therapy dog team with St. John Ambulance

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest pennmorgan

Thank you all for the advice so far. The other dog's owner (who wasn't there at the time - it was a dog sitter) was extremely apologetic and has offered to pay for the bills ($1000). I will certainly be reporting it and I think I'll pick up some kind of spray for now. Walking around the city I think it might not be a great idea to carry a stick or small weapon. I will definitely try to keep a positive attitude, but right now I feel like total garbage. *sigh*

 

I am so sorry this happened to you and Olivia, but glad to hear Olivia will be OK. After this happened to us, Fletcher, who wasn't great with other breeds before, became much more leash aggressive. Some dogs become more fearful. The best thing you can do for your dog is to try and have a positive, upbeat attitude, and not tense up when you see other dogs. I sat "try", because I know how difficult that is :rolleyes: I think a stick is probably the best defense, one long enough to keep some distance between the other dog and you (if possible) The bad thing about sprays is, they can blow back in your face, or your dog's. I have yelled, stomped my feet, even thrown a full bag of poop at one dog :lol You do whatever it takes, but, as you know, everything happens so fast!

 

I suppose it is too much to hope the other owner offered to pay your vet bills :unsure

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you all for the advice so far. The other dog's owner (who wasn't there at the time - it was a dog sitter) was extremely apologetic and has offered to pay for the bills ($1000). I will certainly be reporting it and I think I'll pick up some kind of spray for now. Walking around the city I think it might not be a great idea to carry a stick or small weapon. I will definitely try to keep a positive attitude, but right now I feel like total garbage. *sigh*

 

I am so sorry this happened to you and Olivia, but glad to hear Olivia will be OK. After this happened to us, Fletcher, who wasn't great with other breeds before, became much more leash aggressive. Some dogs become more fearful. The best thing you can do for your dog is to try and have a positive, upbeat attitude, and not tense up when you see other dogs. I sat "try", because I know how difficult that is :rolleyes: I think a stick is probably the best defense, one long enough to keep some distance between the other dog and you (if possible) The bad thing about sprays is, they can blow back in your face, or your dog's. I have yelled, stomped my feet, even thrown a full bag of poop at one dog :lol You do whatever it takes, but, as you know, everything happens so fast!

 

I suppose it is too much to hope the other owner offered to pay your vet bills :unsure

 

Yes, be sure to file a report. The Pit in question needs to have this attack on his/her record. You also need documentation should the owner of the attacking dog not promptly pay the vet bills for you. You may have to file a liability claim against their homeowner's or renters insurance to recover your damages. Many times people promise to pay, then they don't when they find out how much the vet charges actually are.

 

I'm sending a gentle hug to Olivia :gh_child and to you too :grouphug .


gus-rainy-1.jpg?1449508527184&1449508632
CORY and CRICKET - Solitary Tremble & CASPER - Pj's Mia Farrow
* With CAPT. GUS - Solitary Trigger, RAINY - Peach Rain, PUP - Red Zepher, DOC - CTW Fort Sumpter
and MAX - Shiowa's Silver Maxamillion / Afghan .... all waiting at the bridge

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest sheila

Thank you all for the advice so far. The other dog's owner (who wasn't there at the time - it was a dog sitter) was extremely apologetic and has offered to pay for the bills ($1000). I will certainly be reporting it and I think I'll pick up some kind of spray for now. Walking around the city I think it might not be a great idea to carry a stick or small weapon. I will definitely try to keep a positive attitude, but right now I feel like total garbage. *sigh*

 

 

 

While I respect what you are saying about carrying a stick, it's still a better option than a spray I think. With a spray you will have to get it directly in the attacking dogs face to do any good. In a dog fight that could be tough and you're likely to get it in your own dogs face if you succeed, not to mention if the wind is blowing it could end up in your face. They do make expandable baton type sticks that you can carry on your hip.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Poodle was packed on at the dog park, They tried to disembowl him and he and I were worse for the wear, but healed up fine. We went back to the park a few times to try and find the woman who 'd dog started it all. She never came back but Poodle never seemed to have any sort of PTSD so to speak.

 

Most of the wary walkers around here carry golf clubs -- light and sort of non threatening.


gallery_8149_3261_283.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest BrianRke

I've never had to use it, but I have a stun gun that would do the trick. They are legal to carry here in VA but I'm not sure about other parts of the country.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carry a backpack with water bottles in it - it can be used as a weapon if you have a charging dog. Most dogs will also be stopped simply by yelling NO - although this would not work with the more aggressive dogs like pits. Carry a walking stick or get a fold-up cane that you can put in the backpack. If this was me, I wouldn't worry about how carrying a stick looks in your neighborhood.

 

You can also make sure to place your dog behind you by stepping in front of your dog. This puts you between the oncoming dog and your dog and while this can protect your dog for a bit longer, it will put you in danger.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am sorry for your sweet dog. You have just lived through my worst nightmare.


Irene Ullmann w/Shine and Odin in Lower Delaware
Angels Brandy, John E, American Idol, Paul and Fuzzy
Handcrafted Greyhound and Custom Clocks http://www.houndtime.com
Zoom Doggies-Racing Coats for Racing Greyhounds

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The other dog's owner (who wasn't there at the time - it was a dog sitter) was extremely apologetic and has offered to pay for the bills ($1000).

 

Have you thought on this reporting it? The owner was apologetic and has offered to pay for the vet bills. They are trying to do right by you for the dog sitters mistake.

 

Turn the situation around. Your greyhound might have attacked a little fuzzy dog when you accidentally let the lead drop. Anything can happen to anyone at any given time. I really know nothing about LA but isn't walking your dog in downtown LA exposing your dog to danger.

 

Just my thought on the subject.


Vallerysiggy.jpg

Then God sent the Greyhound to live among man and remember. And when the Day comes,

God will call the Greyhound to give Testament, and God will pass judgment on man.

(Persian Proverb)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest madredhare

Oh my, I am so sorry you had to go through this. I personally experienced this same thing, only between 2 greys. It truly was the worst thing I have ever witnessed in my life. I don't have any advice. I wish I did. I am still emotionally scarred. Hope you and your girl heal from this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will do anything to protect my dogs. I carry mace. If I carried a pipe I would try to destroy the offending dog. I have told the idiots living in the neighborhood that I will treat a dog that is loose and thinking about attacking my greys as being a stray. I believe the neighbors understand because most of the time they do not turn their dogs loose anymore. I am not being cold hearted, just protective of the dogs that depend on me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am so sorry you and Olivia had to go through this. A few years back my bridge girl Flossie was attacked by a dog charging out of the front door where it lived. Flossie was hurt pretty bad in the side. Her wounds healed fine, but it did take awhile for her to feel comfortable when a dog would approch us quickly on our walks. She would actually let out a little scream and freeze. I too was very nervous and I know she could feel it. As I learned to be calm she was calm. It took a while, but she learned to enjoy her walks. We never walked by that house again and they only live four doors down from us. Now when we walk I always carry a riding crop in my pocket, if I see a loose dog, I pull it out and am ready to use it as a barrier or strike the dog if I have to.

 

 


gallery_1200_2898_10946.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of our worst nightmares, I'm so sorry this happened to Olivia and you. Having BTDT, I understand your fear and frustration. Dogs live in the moment and Olivia will be her loving self to you again, don't worry about that. :bighug I would definitely report the incident to have it on file. What others have said, put yourself between your dog and the offender(s). Create as tall a posture as you can while facing the offenders. Saying "NOO" using the GSOD will often stop an attacker in its tracks and give you some time to regroup and/or allow for the owner to appear. On certain walks, I have resorted to carrying a riding crop. For me, it is safer than spray (I can see me fumbling with it and spraying my own dogs or myownself :blush ), it is a good length (~1.5') with a strong popper on the end. It doesn't look offensive but it can be just what you need to fend off an attacker. (I hope you don't have to test it.) Take a deep breath and try not to let Olivia know how worried you are. You're a good mom.


Old Dogs are the Best Dogs. :heartThank you, campers. Current enrollees: Aiden. Bea. Punkin. Annie. Miss M. Cletus, knot like the others.

Angels: Pal :heart. Segugio. Sorella (TPGIT). LadyBug. Zeke-aroni. MiMi Sizzle Pants. Gracie. Seamie :heart:brokenheart. (Foster)Sweet. Andy. PaddyALVIN!Mayhem. Bosco. Bruno.Dottie B. Trevor Double-Heart.

 

:paw Upon reflection, our lives are often referenced in parts defined by the all-too-short lives of our dogs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's awful--

 

But try to remember that she isn't a person. She doesn't think about another dog attacking her in the same manner you do. The more uptight you are, the more likely it is she'll react in a negative manner. People "telegraph" their fears and stresses right down the leash to the dog without even realizing it.

 

Sheila is correct about the various sprays you can use on dogs. I used to work for the law enforcement department of the Mass. SPCA, and had a lot of interaction with our state's "animal cops." Yes, they carry a spray on their belt (on the other side of their gun). The spray is more for the people they're forced to seize dogs from, not the dogs. It's also of a strength that isn't legal to carry in this state without a permit. If the dog is close enough to you for the spray to work, it's already close enough to attack your dog. Same with a stun gun. If you can reach out and touch the dog with a stun gun, it's close enough to latch on to your arm. And yes, you're just as likely to get the spray in your own face, or your dog's, as the attacking animal.

 

I like the golf club idea! Perfectly legal to carry a golf club around.

 

I'm really sorry this happened, and I'm sure it was terrible. I bet (and hope!) that you'll be surprised by your girl's resiliance.



Hamish-siggy1.jpg

Susan,  Hamish,  Mister Bigglesworth and Nikita Stanislav. Missing Ming, George, and Buck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We had this happen to us earlier this summer. It was absolutely horrible as the pit latched onto Effie's neck and would not let go for anything.

 

To get a pit off of your dog, you need a break stick. My husband made one out of a hammer handle using our dremel. This link will tell you how to use them and how to make one. http://www.pbrc.net/breaksticks.html

 

We also got a stun gun and carry that too.

 

I am sorry you had to go through that. It was terrifying trying to get that dog off of Effie's neck, and I still relive it in my head.


Effie (Nadine's Effie), Carmen (PHX Downtown), & Benny (the chihuahua)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm so sorry this has happened to you. It is a very traumatic experience for both you and the dog. My pups and I have been attacked 2 times this year and charged at by a number of loose dogs. Not sure what's up with this year because we didn't have any issues last year. Honestly, walking Rex and Brooke is no longer a fun event for me because I'm completely stressed about being attacked again. I now carry direct stop spray, but I would like to upgrade it to real mace though and possibly a long light weight stick of some sort.

 

Rex has taken the brunt of both attacks and is now fear aggressive on lead. I had recently stumbled across some YouTube videos by David the Dog Trainer and he has some really nice videos about working with leash reactivity. Recently started to use some of his idea and it seems to be helping. Two houses up the road from me is a house with a very excitable labish looking dog who is behind an invisible fence (I loath invisible fences) about 18" off the side walk. Usually I'll turn around and rewalk the block just to avoid this dog. For the first time since the first attack, we were able to walk by that dog and Rex didn't react. Granted I was shoving irresistible treats into his face the whole time, but it worked. I definitely recommend looking up David the Dog Trainer and watching his videos.

 

Hope the healing, both physically and mentally, goes well for both you and your pup.


JoAnne, Instagram username mizhunie.

Brooke - Runnin Gamble
Trixie - 7 lbs of furry kitty love

Tucker - WW Charlie Sheen
Elmo - RIP buddy 3/16/12 (miss you so much!) Rex - Four Wheeler 4/18/17 (RIP buddy)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i have gone thru a couple of harrowing attacks w/ my late welsh terrier. i swear he wore a sign that said,"attack me". once a dog came running out of the bushes- i screamed and kicked the dog, lucky he went away. another time in downtown bronxville a pit bull came running out of a service station(that town is so wealthy they don't have gas stations). i ran into the middle of the street(in front of the hospital rush hour) w/ my 2 terriers trying to gain attention and help(drivers did nothing except pull around me) and pick my dogs up(each #25). the pit bull ripped my fake fur goves and jacket, the thick winter coats on the terriers saved them. i was a wreck, the owner finally realised the dog escaped and got him. i ran into a local store shaking and had them call the police. another time my neighbor's dog came running into our driveway and pounced on willie. this time he bit back and became really fearful he started to be aggressive w/ every dog he saw. so, i sent willie to reform school at age 9.5. he was reconditioned and learned to control his fear and focus on his down stay or what ever else i did w/ him. it worked.

 

i had no luck w/ mace, years ago i tried it on my neigbor's crazy dog who was let out randomly and he always attacked. broke a stick across his back, the dog didn't flinch, the police were the answer.

 

it stinks, hopefully your dog will mend quickly. if she shows fear do think about reconditioning, it worked wonders in a matter of weeks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest BrindleBoy

If a loose dog ever attacked mine, my dog wouldn't have to try to defend itself, because *I* would defend it. I'd attack the attacking dog in any way possible, punch in the nose, kick in the side, whatever it took, until it stopped. And if that means the death of the other dog, so be it. Not saying I'd enjoy it or anything, but when it comes to self-defense, of myself or my family (which includes my dog), it's a fight to the death, if necessary.

 

I don't mean to sound callus, I just take the matter of self-preservation/defense VERY seriously. And I take dog ownership VERY seriously... he isn't "just a dog", he's a member of the family, just like anyone else.

 

I would think (and I could be wrong?) that most dogs could be stopped with some loud yelling and aggressive positioning before things got out of hand, giving the other owner time to recall their dog. But if the dog has gone "red zone", game on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...