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Spindle Tumor-Dante Has One


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Foxy's tumor was diagnosed as a spindle cell at first Liz. On subsequent staining they settled on hemangiopericytoma. As you may remember, her's never returned and she lived another 4 years after it was removed. Let me know what Dr C says. Also if you need any chemo drugs, I can work with them to get them here. Even if they say they can't, we can help you.

Casual Bling & Hope for Hounds
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Janet & the hounds Maggie and Allen Missing my baby girl Peanut, old soul Jake, quirky Jet, Mama Grandy and my old Diva Miz Foxy; my angel, my inspiration. You all brought so much into my light, and taught me so much about the power of love, you are with me always.
If you get the chance to sit it out or dance.......... I hope you dance! Missing our littlest girl.

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Rascal has hemangiopericytoma. She had surgery in May '09 to try and remove it, and the vet couldn't remove it all due to it having many 'tendrils'. She told me it would likely recur, but hopefully not in Rascal's lifetime (she's 11). However, I think it's back. :(

Phoebe (Belle's Sweetpea) adopted 9/2/13.

Jack (BTR Captain Jack) 9/28/05--11/2/12
Always missing Buddy, Ruby, and Rascal.

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Hi Liz,

Spindle cell tumor is a somewhat generic name for a group of tumors that arise from connective tissue. Was this diagnosed by FNA? Often this type of tumor can't be further classified on FNA and require a tissue biopsy. Hemangiopericytoma, as others have mentioned, is one subtype of spindle cell tumor. Many of them are slow growing and don't metastasize and can just be removed. There are more malignant varieties (example fibrosarcoma) but this is probably less common and it is actually easier to make that diagnosis on FNA alone.

Julie (human pathologist :) )

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Hi Liz,

Spindle cell tumor is a somewhat generic name for a group of tumors that arise from connective tissue. Was this diagnosed by FNA? Often this type of tumor can't be further classified on FNA and require a tissue biopsy. Hemangiopericytoma, as others have mentioned, is one subtype of spindle cell tumor. Many of them are slow growing and don't metastasize and can just be removed. There are more malignant varieties (example fibrosarcoma) but this is probably less common and it is actually easier to make that diagnosis on FNA alone.

Julie (human pathologist :) )

 

Thank you. Yes, our vet did a FNA. The tumor grew rather quickly.

 

Liz

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In Rascal's case, it presented as a large, fluid filled sac on her upper front leg, near the armpit area. The vet aspirated three large vials of fluid, then palpated the area and felt nodules. She then did a FNA on the nodules, and sent it for biopsy. The results said spindle cell, and we did the surgery; that biopsy narrowed it down to hemangiopericytoma.

 

The vet explained that it was a localized tumor (although no real "mass", just the tendrils), and that it would not metastasize. It may, however, come back in the same area, and we were hoping that Rascal will die of old age in the meantime since she's already 11. However, after Christmas I noticed the area was very red, and a small 'blister' was forming. :( Since then the redness has largely subsided, but the blister is still there. I am keeping an eye on it, and will get the vet to look at it when she goes for her checkup this month.

 

The vet also said that a second surgery usually isn't indicated, since it will generally grow back more deeply seated and difficult to remove the second time. :( So, if it truly is back, who knows what we'll do.

Edited by rascalsmom

Phoebe (Belle's Sweetpea) adopted 9/2/13.

Jack (BTR Captain Jack) 9/28/05--11/2/12
Always missing Buddy, Ruby, and Rascal.

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In Rascal's case, it presented as a large, fluid filled sac on her upper front leg, near the armpit area. The vet aspirated three large vials of fluid, then palpated the area and felt nodules. She then did a FNA on the nodules, and sent it for biopsy. The results said spindle cell, and we did the surgery; that biopsy narrowed it down to hemangiopericytoma.

 

The vet explained that it was a localized tumor (although no real "mass", just the tendrils), and that it would not metastasize. It may, however, come back in the same area, and we were hoping that Rascal will die of old age in the meantime since she's already 11. However, after Christmas I noticed the area was very red, and a small 'blister' was forming. :( Since then the redness has largely subsided, but the blister is still there. I am keeping an eye on it, and will get the vet to look at it when she goes for her checkup this month.

 

The vet also said that a second surgery usually isn't indicated, since it will generally grow back more deeply seated and difficult to remove the second time. :( So, if it truly is back, who knows what we'll do.

 

I just noticed this thread. Spindle cell tumors are one of the types that Dr. Couto has had success treating with his 5FU treatment. This involves injecting a mixture of the 5FU chemo and an oil directly into the tumor. This is typically done about 4 times. Since it is not a general chemo dogs typically have no (or perhaps very minor) side effects. These types of tumors may also respond to radiation. So please contact him for more information. Here is all of the contact info:

 

 

Here is info on how to contact Dr. Couto and his team. The email or phone consult is free, however a few people have been told they must sign up for the website ($50) and submit the request that way. Dr. Couto tells me that this is not true. However, if you are a member of their website, please submit your request that way because it will automate things and make record keeping for them easier. Certain chemo drugs are free; you would need to pay to have them administered.

 

 

Greyhound Health and Wellness Program

 

Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine

 

601 Vernon Tharp Street

 

Columbus, Ohio 43210

 

Phone: (614) 247-6757 or (614) 247-8490

 

Email: greyosu@osu.edu

 

Website: http://www.vet.ohio-state.edu/GHWP.htm (registration and fee now required to get full access to this site)

 

 

This email goes to the team. If Dr. Couto is traveling, you may get a quicker answer from one of his team members. Drs. Marin and Zaldivar typically respond to greyhound owners. The consult is free but if you can afford to support the program please do so. You can sign up for full access to the website ($99 per calendar year) or donate through the giving page on the website. If you decide to donate, you can double your money by giving through the Greyhound Project. They will match the funds that you donate.

 

Just go to this website and scroll down to the appropriate donation button:

 

 

http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/donate.shtml.

 

 

The Team:

 

 

Dr. Couto, Department Head, Greyhound Medicine, Oncology and Hematology

 

Dr. Lili Marin, Greyhound Health and Oncology

 

Dr. Sara Zaldivar, Greyhound Health and Oncology

 

Dr. William Kisselberth, Oncology

 

Dr. Cheryl London, Oncology

 

Dr. Cristina Iazbik, Blood Bank Director and Hematologist

 

Dr. Bridget Urie, Oncology Resident

 

Dr. Matt Sherger, Oncology Resident

 

Dr. Joelle Fenger, Oncology Resident

 

Dr. Roberta Portela, Oncology Resident

 

Dawn Hudson, Vet Tech

 

Ashley DeFelice, Vet Tech

 

Stacey Gallant, Vet Tech

 

 

Drs Marin and Zaldivar are originally from Spanish speaking countries. If you have trouble understanding them over the phone, you might ask for one of the other vets or vet techs to “translate”.

 

 

Dr. Couto's direct email is:

 

couto.1@osu.edu

 

His phone number is also 614-247-6757. If he is in town, he typically returns emails in the early hours of the morning.

 

 

You should know that (in my humble opinion) they need more staff. Unfortunately finances do not permit it at this time. They do 20 to 30 greyhound consults a day along with all of their "in canine" patients. Depending on their workload there may be a wait for the consultation. If you are contacting them on an emergency basis, please let them know.

 

If you want to make an appointment to be seen in person/canine, you can call the main number to set up a date/time. The main number for the veterinary hospital is 614-292-3551.

 

 

If you decide to visit OSU please contact me. I may be able to put you up in a local home, provide moral support, or just help with logistics:

 

 

Finewhipador-drool@yahoo.com

 

 

 

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I think also both RooRoo (maria) and FASave (Melissa) have had dogs with similar type of tumors, and found a local (RI) vet willing to try Dr. Couto's protocol for treatment, as he wanted to do something that did not involve whole scale chemo and radiation.

 

You may have to search around for a vet willing to try something 'different'

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Nancy and

Grace - Andicot 2/1/07

Solo - Flying Han Solo 3/20/11

Missing: Murphy, Shine, Kim, Sprite, Red Dog, Lottie & Harry

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Checking for any updates. Been thinking about you.

Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
We miss Reko Batman (Trouper Zeke x Marque Louisiana), 11/15/95-6/29/06, Rocco the thistledown whippet, 04/29/93-10/14/08, Reko Zema (Mo Kick x Reko Princess), 8/16/98-4/18/10, the most beautiful girl in the whole USA, my good egg Joseph aka Won by a Nose (Oneco Cufflink x Buy Back), 09/22/2003-03/01/2013, and our gentle sweet Gidget (Digitizer, Dodgem by Design x Sobe Mulberry), 1/29/2006-11/22/2014, gone much too soon. Never forgetting CJC's Buckshot, 1/2/07-10/25/10.

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Yes, both RooRoo and myself have experience with the 5FU treatment and I would highly recommend tracking down a vet that is willing to administer the protocol. It's frustrating that not all vets embrace this treatment. It's easier on the pups and affordable for more people. I hate that some pups have to suffer because the veterinary world is so fragmented. Let me know if you want more information although RooRoo was the one who jumped through hoops to find someone in the greater Boston MA area willing to administer the treatment.

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My whippet Rickie had hemangiopericytoma on his right rear thigh. The first surgery did not get clean margins and it came back about one year later. We had a second surgery done by a board-certified surgeon at the local specialty clinic and this time they got it all, though with very small margins (a couple of mm). It has been a little over two years since then, and there has been no recurrence.

 

I will say that the second surgery was quite aggressive - it required removing some muscle and a creating a skin flap from his stomach but we did all we were told to do at home during the recovery period, and got through it without significant issue. Rickie's never looked back.

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In Rascal's case, it presented as a large, fluid filled sac on her upper front leg, near the armpit area. The vet aspirated three large vials of fluid, then palpated the area and felt nodules. She then did a FNA on the nodules, and sent it for biopsy. The results said spindle cell, and we did the surgery; that biopsy narrowed it down to hemangiopericytoma.

 

The vet explained that it was a localized tumor (although no real "mass", just the tendrils), and that it would not metastasize. It may, however, come back in the same area, and we were hoping that Rascal will die of old age in the meantime since she's already 11. However, after Christmas I noticed the area was very red, and a small 'blister' was forming. :( Since then the redness has largely subsided, but the blister is still there. I am keeping an eye on it, and will get the vet to look at it when she goes for her checkup this month.

 

The vet also said that a second surgery usually isn't indicated, since it will generally grow back more deeply seated and difficult to remove the second time. :( So, if it truly is back, who knows what we'll do.

 

I just noticed this thread. Spindle cell tumors are one of the types that Dr. Couto has had success treating with his 5FU treatment. This involves injecting a mixture of the 5FU chemo and an oil directly into the tumor. This is typically done about 4 times. Since it is not a general chemo dogs typically have no (or perhaps very minor) side effects. These types of tumors may also respond to radiation. So please contact him for more information. Here is all of the contact info:

 

 

Here is info on how to contact Dr. Couto and his team. The email or phone consult is free, however a few people have been told they must sign up for the website ($50) and submit the request that way. Dr. Couto tells me that this is not true. However, if you are a member of their website, please submit your request that way because it will automate things and make record keeping for them easier. Certain chemo drugs are free; you would need to pay to have them administered.

 

 

Greyhound Health and Wellness Program

 

Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine

 

601 Vernon Tharp Street

 

Columbus, Ohio 43210

 

Phone: (614) 247-6757 or (614) 247-8490

 

Email: greyosu@osu.edu

 

Website: http://www.vet.ohio-state.edu/GHWP.htm (registration and fee now required to get full access to this site)

 

 

This email goes to the team. If Dr. Couto is traveling, you may get a quicker answer from one of his team members. Drs. Marin and Zaldivar typically respond to greyhound owners. The consult is free but if you can afford to support the program please do so. You can sign up for full access to the website ($99 per calendar year) or donate through the giving page on the website. If you decide to donate, you can double your money by giving through the Greyhound Project. They will match the funds that you donate.

 

Just go to this website and scroll down to the appropriate donation button:

 

 

http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/donate.shtml.

 

 

The Team:

 

 

Dr. Couto, Department Head, Greyhound Medicine, Oncology and Hematology

 

Dr. Lili Marin, Greyhound Health and Oncology

 

Dr. Sara Zaldivar, Greyhound Health and Oncology

 

Dr. William Kisselberth, Oncology

 

Dr. Cheryl London, Oncology

 

Dr. Cristina Iazbik, Blood Bank Director and Hematologist

 

Dr. Bridget Urie, Oncology Resident

 

Dr. Matt Sherger, Oncology Resident

 

Dr. Joelle Fenger, Oncology Resident

 

Dr. Roberta Portela, Oncology Resident

 

Dawn Hudson, Vet Tech

 

Ashley DeFelice, Vet Tech

 

Stacey Gallant, Vet Tech

 

 

Drs Marin and Zaldivar are originally from Spanish speaking countries. If you have trouble understanding them over the phone, you might ask for one of the other vets or vet techs to “translate”.

 

 

Dr. Couto's direct email is:

 

couto.1@osu.edu

 

His phone number is also 614-247-6757. If he is in town, he typically returns emails in the early hours of the morning.

 

 

You should know that (in my humble opinion) they need more staff. Unfortunately finances do not permit it at this time. They do 20 to 30 greyhound consults a day along with all of their "in canine" patients. Depending on their workload there may be a wait for the consultation. If you are contacting them on an emergency basis, please let them know.

 

If you want to make an appointment to be seen in person/canine, you can call the main number to set up a date/time. The main number for the veterinary hospital is 614-292-3551.

 

 

If you decide to visit OSU please contact me. I may be able to put you up in a local home, provide moral support, or just help with logistics:

 

 

Finewhipador-drool@yahoo.com

 

Thanks so much for this information. I will most definitely ask our vet about doing this, if I am right in thinking her cancer is back (or more correctly, "active", since this wasn't a defined mass, but tendrils).

Our vet studied at OSU under Dr. C., so I would bet she'd be willing to work with them.

Phoebe (Belle's Sweetpea) adopted 9/2/13.

Jack (BTR Captain Jack) 9/28/05--11/2/12
Always missing Buddy, Ruby, and Rascal.

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