Jump to content

Biting While Being Petted


Guest leemc
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi . I am a new Mom to Gracie. We adopted her in the beginning of October.She is 3 years old. Things have been fine,except the fact that she wakes me up every morning between 4am and 6am to eat :( Last week she was laying on her bed in the den with the family and my 12 year old daughter was petting her. She was wide awake and seemed to be enjoying it. My daughter even put a blanket on her and a small pillow under her head. All of a sudden Gracie lunged up at my daughter and made contact with her forehead. I was sitting about 3 feet away of the couch. I immediately looked up and Gracie was chattering her teeth. Thankfully my daughter was ok and there was no blood or bite mark on her. Gracie has been fine ever since. I have told my daughter that maybe she felt threatened by covering her with the blanket (although I had covered her several times before with no problem). I also thought that maybe my daughter accidentally leaned on her foot and hurt her. I have since told my daughter never to approach her while she is on her bed even if she is awake.If anyone has any thoughts about what we did wrong I would really appreciate it.

Thank you so much

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Lovey_Hounds

most Greyhounds are not used to being touched and stuff while in bed, your daughter my have shifted the wrong way and pushed somewhere that wasnt comfortable so she got a warning... trust me that was a warning greyhounds are fast and if she wanted to bite she would have.

the best thing to do is not continue that behavior until she has been with you longer and you get to know her better and she knows you better. I have had my youngest greyhound since she was 3 months old and she is now 2 years old, i still do not bother her when she is sleeping in specific places (her kennel is a big no). every dog has boundaries like we do so she has let you know what bothers her so respect that, once she gets used to the idea of whats going on and settles in all the way thing may be different.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would instruct your daughter never to bother her while she is on her bed. She's new to the home and learning to trust each and every member of the family. Greyhounds are used to sleeping in a crate and never being disturbed with people coming and interrupting them. This is something new for her and she has to get used to it. It could have been either the blanket or the pillow that set her off. Give her more time to settle in and learn to trust the entire family. Her chattering afterward was nervous excitement. I'm sure she wasn't sure whether she was going to get in trouble or not. It takes some greyhounds months before they are settled into a home so until then, take it slow. Let your daughter know what her life was like before coming to your home. She had her own personal space that no one intruded upon, she ate there and slept there. Her world was regimented so she knew when it was time to eat, when it was time to go out, when it was time to go race. She has been plucked from that world and placed into a place full of things she's never been exposed to, doors, carpeted floors, no crate, strangers around her, no personal space, in other words, it would be like someone coming and placing you in another country, where you don't know the language, don't know the way of life. Once you look at it that way, you can understand why some hounds have problems. Slow and steady wins the race when it comes to these beautiful hounds but the trip is well worth it!

Judy, mom to Darth Vader, Bandita, And Angel

Forever in our hearts, DeeYoGee, Dani, Emmy, Andy, Heart, Saint, Valentino, Arrow, Gee, Bebe, Jilly Bean, Bullitt, Pistol, Junior, Sammie, Joey, Gizmo, Do Bee

Link to comment
Share on other sites

most Greyhounds are not used to being touched and stuff while in bed, your daughter my have shifted the wrong way and pushed somewhere that wasnt comfortable so she got a warning... trust me that was a warning greyhounds are fast and if she wanted to bite she would have.

the best thing to do is not continue that behavior until she has been with you longer and you get to know her better and she knows you better. I have had my youngest greyhound since she was 3 months old and she is now 2 years old, i still do not bother her when she is sleeping in specific places (her kennel is a big no). every dog has boundaries like we do so she has let you know what bothers her so respect that, once she gets used to the idea of whats going on and settles in all the way thing may be different.

 

 

Thank you very much :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest KennelMom

We actually have a foster right now and we're helping her work through similar issues....

 

I have told my daughter that maybe she felt threatened by covering her with the blanket (although I had covered her several times before with no problem).

 

entirely possible. it could just be that she'd had enough and wanted to be left alone.

 

 

I also thought that maybe my daughter accidentally leaned on her foot and hurt her.

 

also possible, though I'd lean more towards the first idea you had

 

 

I have since told my daughter never to approach her while she is on her bed even if she is awake.If anyone has any thoughts about what we did wrong I would really appreciate it.

 

Sounds very prudent to me. A dog's bed really should be their "quiet time" space where they aren't disturbed. I know how hard of a rule that is for adults to follow, kids even moreso. But, it really is the best way to avoid situations like the one that happened.

 

I'm glad your daughter wasn't seriously injured...and thanks to you for handling it so well.

Edited by KennelMom
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would instruct your daughter never to bother her while she is on her bed. She's new to the home and learning to trust each and every member of the family. Greyhounds are used to sleeping in a crate and never being disturbed with people coming and interrupting them. This is something new for her and she has to get used to it. It could have been either the blanket or the pillow that set her off. Give her more time to settle in and learn to trust the entire family. Her chattering afterward was nervous excitement. I'm sure she wasn't sure whether she was going to get in trouble or not. It takes some greyhounds months before they are settled into a home so until then, take it slow. Let your daughter know what her life was like before coming to your home. She had her own personal space that no one intruded upon, she ate there and slept there. Her world was regimented so she knew when it was time to eat, when it was time to go out, when it was time to go race. She has been plucked from that world and placed into a place full of things she's never been exposed to, doors, carpeted floors, no crate, strangers around her, no personal space, in other words, it would be like someone coming and placing you in another country, where you don't know the language, don't know the way of life. Once you look at it that way, you can understand why some hounds have problems. Slow and steady wins the race when it comes to these beautiful hounds but the trip is well worth it!

 

 

Thank you very much :)

 

We actually have a foster right now and we're helping her work through similar issues....

 

I have told my daughter that maybe she felt threatened by covering her with the blanket (although I had covered her several times before with no problem).

 

entirely possible. it could just be that she'd had enough and wanted to be left alone.

 

 

I also thought that maybe my daughter accidentally leaned on her foot and hurt her.

 

also possible, though I'd lean more towards the first idea you had

 

 

I have since told my daughter never to approach her while she is on her bed even if she is awake.If anyone has any thoughts about what we did wrong I would really appreciate it.

 

Sounds very prudent to me. A dog's bed really should be their "quiet time" space where they aren't disturbed. I know how hard of a rule that is for adults to follow, kids even moreso. But, it really is the best way to avoid situations like the one that happened.

 

I'm glad your daughter wasn't seriously injured...and thanks to you for handling it so well.

 

Thank You very much :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Bang_o_rama

I immediately looked up and Gracie was chattering her teeth.

 

An odd combination, since chattering is generally (as far I I can tell with Bang and have read here) a happy-excitement behavior. Any chance the dog had dozed off, got startled, then started chattering by way of apology? Because I have had a dog who actually apologized for accidental nips inflicted while playing tug.

 

And more time to settle in definitely will make incidents less likely.

 

~D~

Edited by Bang_o_rama
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest KennelMom

Chattering is generally associated with excited/happiness, but I also see it often in some dogs whenever they are just trying to figure something out - usually involving air scenting though. Kinda like how cats "taste" the air with their Jacobsen's organ (do dogs have one :dunno )

 

..

 

OK...really interesting and maybe tangentially related...I googled to see if dogs had a Jacobson's organ, since I have only ever heard it talked about with respect to cats and it turns out that dogs do. From this site: http://www.aces.edu/pubs/docs/U/UNP-0066/UNP-0066.pdf

 

Olfactory receptor cells in the vomeronasal organ (Jacobson's organ) also send impulses to the region of the hypothalamus associated with sexual and social behaviors. This organ is believed to be important in the detection of pheromones (body scents). This theory could account for the dog’s ability to identify and recognize other animals and people.

 

makes sense...I've also seen dogs chatter after/while sniffing butts or checking pee mail.

Edited by KennelMom
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It sounds more like excitement than aggression. When I first adopted Fiona she didn't really know how to show affection. She often did "air snaps" (i.e. biting the air) which can be perceived to be aggressive but is actually a sign of excitement (like the chatttering Gracie displayed). She also often butted me in the face with her nose because she didn't know how to lick or give kisses.

 

I suspect something similar is happening here. Gracie was excited but didn't really know what appropriate behavior was. The advice others have given is good. Let Gracie have quiet time when she is on her bed and in the meantime she will learn how to give and receive affection in an appropriate manner.

Edited by fionasmom
Link to comment
Share on other sites

All of the above are great, supportive answers / theories. Agree with all of them.

 

What immediately came to my mind though are cats. You know, you are petting them, watching TV, all seems fine in the world and all of a sudden, without warning, wammo! A little scratch or nip. As you all come to know each other a bit more, everyone will relax and get to know warning signs. They were probably there, just not yet known to you. Hang tight - I'd expect things to mellow out in time. Take precautions but know that the dog you see before you today will not be the same one several months or a year from now. Enjoy, but carefully for now!

Doe's Bruciebaby Doe's Bumper

Derek

Follow my Ironman journeys and life with dogs, cats and busy kids: A long road

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We learned the hard way too.

 

Never pet your grey when they are in their own bed, or anywhere that is considered "their space." It is dangerous for any child the be in or near the pup's bed. The dogs who trained or raced have had their own space (crate or kennel) since they were 6 months old. Even if they only drift off a little, movement or petting them is a major startle and can provoke a bite. We've been through the biting issue twice, both times while our dog was in a bed, and appeared to be awake and enjoying interaction. Rule in our house is you don't get petted unless you are standing. (This boy is not a snuggler - some are.)

 

Good luck with your new pup.

rocket-signature-jpeg.jpg

Camp Broodie. The current home of Mark Kay Mark Jack and LaVida I've Got Life.  Always missing my boy Rocket Hi Noon Rocket,  Allie  Phoenix Dynamite, Kate Miss Kate, Starz Under Da Starz, Petunia MW Neptunia and Diva Astar Dashindiva 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Greyt_dog_lover

Your story is a bit limited as to all the events (how long was your daughter petting, where was she the moment his head came up-was she leaning directly over his head to say put the pillow under his head, did he ever move before he lunged up,etc). To me it actually sounds like an excited hound, as odd as it may seem. Currently my foster boy (who is refered to as "happy goofus") has "bit" me on the head more than a few times when he gets really excited at dinner time. When he is laying down sometimes he suddenly "freaks out" gets super excited, throws his head up in the air and snaps then roaches and wiggles around. With the "chatter" you describe after the event, and the fact that your daughter was petting him, maybe he just suddenly got excited and lunged up with an open mouth. That is a common thing for my foster to do when he is laying down and gets excited from the belly rubs. And as others have said, he didnt bite her, had he truly tried to "bite", she would not be without wounds.

 

Chad

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am to hear that you daughter is ok. Some dogs don't like being leaned over. Did she maybe lean over her and scare her? For now if you daughter wants to pet the dog. Have her call the dog over to her. Instead of her petting the dog on her dog bed.

Sarah, mom to Stella and Winston . And to Prince, Katie Z, Malone, Brooke, Freddie, Angel and Fast who are all waiting at the Bridge!

www.gpawisconsin.org

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You've gotten all the good advice you need--and your future plan is perfect.

 

My Greyhound actually sleeps with his eyes open sometimes, so having your child not touching the dog on the bed is the safest bet!

 

I hope she doesn't hold it against the dog!


Hamish-siggy1.jpg

Susan,  Hamish,  Mister Bigglesworth and Nikita Stanislav. Missing Ming, George, and Buck

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i had a similar incident w/ annie and my daughter. but my daughter is an adult, 27! our late gal emily(even when she was in pain w/ osteo) and current male felx always welcomes cuddeling and petting on their beds. well, annie was not so welcoming, she snapped. obviously annie needs her space, she enjoys having her bed brought into the living room area while all of us watch tv, but is more aloof in her space and chooses her moments of affection. she will place her head on our foot or walk over and stick her head in your lap. but just like people, some are overly affectionate and cuddely some are more aloof.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you everyone for the replies. It is so nice to know that I have a place to come to for questions and advice from a group of wonderful people such as yourselves ! :)

Happy Holidays to all !!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Stripeyfan

I agree with fionasmom that this sounds more like excitement than aggression. If I'm petting Kelly and he's in a silly/playful mood, he'll lunge and snap to try to grab my sleeves/arms etc, but he's certainly not being aggressive - his body language is relaxed and happy and usually his tail's thumping against the floor. I stop him by saying a firm 'OY' and not petting him again until he's calmed down.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I would instruct your daughter never to bother her while she is on her bed. She's new to the home and learning to trust each and every member of the family. Greyhounds are used to sleeping in a crate and never being disturbed with people coming and interrupting them. This is something new for her and she has to get used to it. It could have been either the blanket or the pillow that set her off. Give her more time to settle in and learn to trust the entire family. Her chattering afterward was nervous excitement. I'm sure she wasn't sure whether she was going to get in trouble or not. It takes some greyhounds months before they are settled into a home so until then, take it slow. Let your daughter know what her life was like before coming to your home. She had her own personal space that no one intruded upon, she ate there and slept there. Her world was regimented so she knew when it was time to eat, when it was time to go out, when it was time to go race. She has been plucked from that world and placed into a place full of things she's never been exposed to, doors, carpeted floors, no crate, strangers around her, no personal space, in other words, it would be like someone coming and placing you in another country, where you don't know the language, don't know the way of life. Once you look at it that way, you can understand why some hounds have problems. Slow and steady wins the race when it comes to these beautiful hounds but the trip is well worth it!

 

Very well said. Good word!

 

 

We learned the hard way too.

 

Never pet your grey when they are in their own bed, or anywhere that is considered "their space." It is dangerous for any child the be in or near the pup's bed. The dogs who trained or raced have had their own space (crate or kennel) since they were 6 months old. Even if they only drift off a little, movement or petting them is a major startle and can provoke a bite. We've been through the biting issue twice, both times while our dog was in a bed, and appeared to be awake and enjoying interaction. Rule in our house is you don't get petted unless you are standing. (This boy is not a snuggler - some are.)

 

Good luck with your new pup.

 

Thanks for that, helps me too.

 

 

Wow, this thread (subject? - learning the terms here LOL) is very educational to me. Never figured this. I have had Greys for over 15 years. Thank you all for the information for me too.

:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It sounds more like excitement than aggression ....

 

 

... I suspect something similar is happening here. Gracie was excited but didn't really know what appropriate behavior was. The advice others have given is good. Let Gracie have quiet time when she is on her bed and in the meantime she will learn how to give and receive affection in an appropriate manner.

 

 

I agree with fionasmom that this sounds more like excitement than aggression. If I'm petting Kelly and he's in a silly/playful mood, he'll lunge and snap to try to grab my sleeves/arms etc, but he's certainly not being aggressive - his body language is relaxed and happy and usually his tail's thumping against the floor. I stop him by saying a firm 'OY' and not petting him again until he's calmed down.

 

I was thinking something similar. Young greyhounds can get very excited, and can indeed respond with what to them is affection - the air snap. I have some ferocious looking pictures of my lovely, super-gentle Renie (a registered therapy dog) doing air snaps. She only ever did it with family, so never any worries when she was working, but with me, particularly, she would snap the air with excitement, especially when I was rubbing her belly and she wanted me to continue.

 

The key with a dog who does this is to constantly watch her body language. Keep taking little breaks in the belly rubbing, and when you do, watch out for the air snap. An air snapping dog will never voluntarily make contact, so if you have a dog like this, take care not to move part of yourself while he or she is likely to do it. My guess is that perhaps that's what happened with your daughter - Gracie went to air snap at the same time as your daughter leaned forward to pet her some more and contact was made. As others have said, the chattering seems to suggest playfulness, apology, or excitement, though sometimes it can be a 'confused' thing, too.

 

Air snappers never intend to hurt, but the weight and speed of their head can mean that their teeth can cut and bruise you. Best to avoid injury by taking care, but if contact is made and your dog ever hurts you, if only a very little (whether with an air snap or somehow else), it's helpful if you yelp like a puppy. It's instinctive to most dogs not to hurt a puppy, or to back off when they get a response, and it teaches them how easy it is to hurt us fragile beings.

 

I'm glad to hear your daughter wasn't seriously hurt! :)

 

Oh, and yes, as the others have said - with a new dog, best not to pet them on their bed at all. And if you do pet them, take great care with things like belly-rubs. These are best kept for dogs you know very, very well indeed, and who trust you completely. Many dogs never learn to enjoy them.

GTAvatar-2015_zpsb0oqcimj.jpg

The plural of anecdote is not data

Brambleberry Greyhounds My Etsy Shop

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It sounds more like excitement than aggression ....

 

 

... I suspect something similar is happening here. Gracie was excited but didn't really know what appropriate behavior was. The advice others have given is good. Let Gracie have quiet time when she is on her bed and in the meantime she will learn how to give and receive affection in an appropriate manner.

 

 

I agree with fionasmom that this sounds more like excitement than aggression. If I'm petting Kelly and he's in a silly/playful mood, he'll lunge and snap to try to grab my sleeves/arms etc, but he's certainly not being aggressive - his body language is relaxed and happy and usually his tail's thumping against the floor. I stop him by saying a firm 'OY' and not petting him again until he's calmed down.

 

I was thinking something similar. Young greyhounds can get very excited, and can indeed respond with what to them is affection - the air snap. I have some ferocious looking pictures of my lovely, super-gentle Renie (a registered therapy dog) doing air snaps. She only ever did it with family, so never any worries when she was working, but with me, particularly, she would snap the air with excitement, especially when I was rubbing her belly and she wanted me to continue.

 

The key with a dog who does this is to constantly watch her body language. Keep taking little breaks in the belly rubbing, and when you do, watch out for the air snap. An air snapping dog will never voluntarily make contact, so if you have a dog like this, take care not to move part of yourself while he or she is likely to do it. My guess is that perhaps that's what happened with your daughter - Gracie went to air snap at the same time as your daughter leaned forward to pet her some more and contact was made. As others have said, the chattering seems to suggest playfulness, apology, or excitement, though sometimes it can be a 'confused' thing, too.

 

Air snappers never intend to hurt, but the weight and speed of their head can mean that their teeth can cut and bruise you. Best to avoid injury by taking care, but if contact is made and your dog ever hurts you, if only a very little (whether with an air snap or somehow else), it's helpful if you yelp like a puppy. It's instinctive to most dogs not to hurt a puppy, or to back off when they get a response, and it teaches them how easy it is to hurt us fragile beings.

 

I'm glad to hear your daughter wasn't seriously hurt! :)

 

Oh, and yes, as the others have said - with a new dog, best not to pet them on their bed at all. And if you do pet them, take great care with things like belly-rubs. These are best kept for dogs you know very, very well indeed, and who trust you completely. Many dogs never learn to enjoy them.

 

 

Thank You! I'm happy to say that there have been no further issues since that time :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
Guest reneemarie

Banshee's bit my head once before, during playtime. I was trying to teach her how to play with a stuffed animal, and she grabbed it, did about a half a dozen spinny circles, then doubled back and grabbed my pony tail.

 

...I was dragged halfway across the living room before she realized that I was not the stuffed pheasant that she remembered she dropped by the loveseat -____-

 

At least I got a little face licking and head snuggling (she does a weird head-butt-snuggle thing) as an apology before she pranced off for the toy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Banshee's bit my head once before, during playtime. I was trying to teach her how to play with a stuffed animal, and she grabbed it, did about a half a dozen spinny circles, then doubled back and grabbed my pony tail.

 

...I was dragged halfway across the living room before she realized that I was not the stuffed pheasant that she remembered she dropped by the loveseat -____-

 

At least I got a little face licking and head snuggling (she does a weird head-butt-snuggle thing) as an apology before she pranced off for the toy.

 

Oh my goodness....I'm glad you're ok!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank You! I'm happy to say that there have been no further issues since that time :)

 

 

That is good news!

Judy, mom to Darth Vader, Bandita, And Angel

Forever in our hearts, DeeYoGee, Dani, Emmy, Andy, Heart, Saint, Valentino, Arrow, Gee, Bebe, Jilly Bean, Bullitt, Pistol, Junior, Sammie, Joey, Gizmo, Do Bee

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest jessie1234

We had exactly the same issue with Chloe when we first got her. I didnt realise this issue was so prevelant. It made us very strict with "our mat" and "her mat". She is allowed on our mats for cuddles and play time etc, however if she wants to "sleep" she has to go onto her mat. I also noticed it took her about 9 months to accept our youngest as a member of the "pack" very interesting to watch the dynamics change when she did so! <3

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...