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Guest Rajiraj
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Guest Rajiraj

I love dogs (having grown up with a mutt) and am very keen to adopt a retired greyhound for all the usual reasons, but I am not sure my lifestyle and temperament would suit. A penny for your thoughts.

 

First, lifestyle. My wife and I live in a fairly spacious ground floor flat with a balcony but no fully secure outdoor space. We have room for a crate in our study (where we spend a lot of time) and space for a dog bed in our living room (where we spend the rest of our time). So I would expect that we would initially crate the dog during the day and allow him to wander between the living room and study in the mornings and evenings (and on weekends). If we got a grey, I would take a week or so off work to make sure I could be around in the early stages. But after that, the routine is that we are away from home from about 8am to about 7pm on weekdays and this is unlikely to change. On the other hand, we tend to be home much of the evenings and weekends and are happy to take a dog on plenty of walks etc at these times. Although I am sure many greys need lots of company, I have heard that some are quite independent. Also, the adoption agency asks about lifestyle habits when putting forward dogs for particular people, so we could expect that they would try to find an independent dog for us. Finally, plenty of flat-owning greyhound owners I have spoken to tell me that their dog manages without company and toilet trips for many hours during the day while they are at work. But I am a bit sceptical. What do you think?

 

Second, temperament. Living on our own for many years without unpredictable and messy children around has led us to become fairly neat and intolerant of chaos. I would not be happy about a dog chewing lots of things and regularly weeing indoors. We have new-ish furniture and rugs around which I would not want to see ruined. Am I dreaming to think that by diligent crating and supervision, we could avoid a dog destroying our possessions? I know this probably sounds unrealistic and inflexible to most of you. But that is what I am trying to find out - am I too anal to get a greyhound?

 

While I would love to get one, I am willing to be told I should forget about getting a greyhound. If so, please be nice about it!

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Guest cwholsin

I've read about other people's greyhounds that seem to do fine in similar conditions to yours. They really are pretty lazy and lay around most of the time. If you guys are prepared for taking the dog for daily walks regardless of weather, I don't see why it's a problem. I don't know that I've ever heard of a dog that -never- had an accident, plenty of GH owners have dogs that have had few. With respect to your nice furniture, I would recommend getting a female as the chances of marking behavior are less than with a male.

 

Sounds to me like a low-energy, independent dog that has preferably been fostered would be perfect for you guys. Happy dog hunting!!

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It can be done. Many greys do just fine as only dogs in apartments.

 

IMO If you are away 11 hours a day you would really need to hire a dog walker (doesn't have to be a professional -- maybe a stay at home neighbor) to take the dog for a spin around noon. It is just me but I am comfortable with 9 or so hours but not so much with 11.

 

You didn't mention your plans for sleeping arrangements at night, but if you are planning to crate the dog another 8 hours while you sleep then I personally wouldn't get a dog. If you can baby gate him in your bedroom on a dog bed at night it might work, but in a crate 19 hours a day is no life for a dog. Yes they do it at the kennels, but they have big kennels. usually about 71 of their best canine friends around them and trainers and kennel help coming and going all day. That is a different ballgame.

 

Greyhounds are like any dog and as Forrest Gump said, like a box of chocolates. You never know what you are going to get despite the best screening efforts. If you want a dog of any breed you have to buckle up to the possibilty that it may well poop, pee, barf and chew on your things and you just have to work through it when it happens and adapt. I still mourn my $135 Filofax, my favorite robe of all time and 8 square inches of of my car door. It can happen in the blink of an eye.

 

I still remember Windy (Britchesindawind). A lady walked into Petsmart, said "We found her on our ranch", handed me a leash and walked out. We had a lovely older couple that had been coming to every meet and greet for months. They'd bought all the suggested reading and fell in love with petite black Windy. Imagine my surprise when in less than 24 hours I got a call to come get her immediately. When I got there the couple said that their elderly lab had peed in one corner of the living room and after he died they had replaced the carpet. Now Windy had peed where their lab peed and they were "not going to replace any more carpet over a dog" so she had to go -- NOW. They were on slab and had not had it sealed before the new carpet (but even that doesn't always work in some cases). Windy went on to a wonderful home so it all worked out for the best but that still floors me.

 

It can be done, but you have to have a little bit of give and not toss in the towel at the first pee accident or poop. And if dilligent crating is 19 hours a day five days a week in my opinion, maybe not such a good idea. :dunno

 

Best of luck and kudos to you for thinking it out.

 

I would recommend getting a female as the chances of marking behavior are less than with a male.

I am currently pet sitting a female that has ruined the carpet in 4 houses to date. See Windy above too...but that wan't really her fault.

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My boys have always been the real champs for not wetting in the house. My girls have always seemed to go more often than the boys. I have had no marking from my own boys, one male greyhound I was sitting for tried to mark my vacuum, but I caught him and he understood the NO and the trip outside. :)

While crating might be needed in the beginning, I would think that over time, you could let the dog out of the crate into at least part of the house.

And all dogs have the occasional accident of one sort or another. I had a sick dog last night who threw up several times.

I can count the accidents my poodle has had on one hand, and on one finger that were his fault, but one night he got sick and he had diarrhea all over my bedroom. It cleans up, but it happens and you have to expect that it's going to happen eventually.

Good luck!

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Guest Stripeyfan

I wouldn't say not having a secure outside space is so much of a problem - you can take the dog out for potty breaks on a leash - but if you can't get home during the day, could you hire a dog walker to let it out and exercise it? I truly believe that a dog needs daily exercise to keep it happy and fit, Kelly gets 2 walks of at least half an hour a day, no matter how tired or busy we are. It means I will never get a lie in again but he's totally worth it! Also, if a dog gets daily exercise it is less likely to chew and destroy things because it's not full of pent-up energy (yes, even greys have a bit of that sometimes!) which turns to frustration/boredom. We also make sure Kelly has plenty of things he can chew, like rag ropes, although don't ever leave a dog with these unsupervised in case they eat bits of them.

 

As for messing in the house... Kelly has been perfectly housetrained from the day we got him (if he needs to go out at night he always barks to let us know). However in January he got sick with IBD and was put on prednisone, which makes a dog drink, drink, drink and pee, pee, pee, meaning through no fault of his own he had many accidents in the house. I guess what I'm trying to say is that even the best housetrained dog will not always be able to hold it if they're sick, so no matter what breed they are, unfortunately your carpets will suffer at some point, I guarantee it! Plus there's muddy paws etc, and even greys shed (Kelly's just blown his coat massively because his winter coat's growing in).

 

Anyway I will finish here as it's time to take his stripeyness out for a walk (in the rain... and it's still dark...violin.giflol.gif). Good luck with your decison! smile.gif

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I think dogs are like life! No guarantees. My Micah has never had a pee or poop accident in the house and we've had him for 10 months now. That doesn't mean that when he has a bad tummy that he's not going to barf or poop indoors. Not his fault. Just like with kids you have to roll with the punches and if that's something that you think might be a problem for you then I think you're smart for taking the time to ask opinions and really think it through. If you do decide that a greyhounds for you I think you'll probably love having the extra fun in your life because they really are so sweet and fun. Good luck to you.

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Unless you are willing to fence in your yard and install a dog door so the poor dog doesn't have to try to hold it for 11 hours every day - or hire a dog walker - I say you are better off getting a cat. (cats have accidents in the house too though :blush )

 

Greyhounds are wonderful, mellow houseguest - and cleaner in the home than most breeds of dogs. But with you being gone such long hours you are setting up any dog for failure once and awhile.

 

I have a nice neat and clean home - my stuff isn't chewed up and I have two Greyhounds in my home. I think they are the best thing in the world. They have been left for 9-10 hours at a time with no issues. Both have free run of the house, and are never crated. But that said, eleven hours is a much longer time period when you have a full bladder and you're anxious for your owner to return! Would you have someone in place to take the dog out if you are forced to work overtime, or you have to stop to pick up groceries on the way home and you can't make it on time?

 

When you get home from a long day at work, you still have all the normal duties of making dinner, and household chores ... etc. Without a proper fenced yard, you will need to walk the dog several times a day .... and since there is no turn out area for the dog to play and exercise in - this means that you will have to commit to an hour or more of just walking time each day, split between atleast 4 times. The dog will need to go out when it first awakes, again after it has eaten and before you go to work, immediately when you get home, and again before you go to bed at night. You will not be able to stop anywhere after work, you'll need to rush right home every single day to walk your dog.

 

Greyhounds are wonderful, wonderful, wonderful creatures - and such kind souls. They try so hard to please and are the best pets ever. I just want to make sure you are aware of how much work any dog is going to be, even "easy" ones like Greyhounds. What they add to your life is priceless - unconditional love and total devotion. They do deserve the same in return from their owner. ;)

 

If you are willing to make the necessary life changes to bring one into your home - only then should you make the commitment.

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* With CAPT. GUS - Solitary Trigger, RAINY - Peach Rain, PUP - Red Zepher, DOC - CTW Fort Sumpter
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I will echo what others have said - with any dog (or human, for that matter), there is the expectation that there will at some point be something damaged, broken or have bodily fluids on it. That's life. Crating any dog for 20+/- hours isn't fair to the dog, so you'd have to think a little differently there.

 

However - we have our first greyhound whom has been with us for just over 6 months. Bella's had one accident in the house because we weren't paying enough attention that first weekend. She goes generally from 8 in the morning to 5-6 at night without a potty break and is just fine. We were coming home those first couple of weeks and toward the end were waking her up to go outside, so stopped that pretty quickly.

 

We did crate during the day at first until she started learning that not everything that she could pick up was hers and that the apartment wasn't the place to pee - ever since then, she's been baby-gated in the bedroom during the day more for our peace of mind that any problems on her part. We rarely crate her - it's usually only if we're traveling (in a hotel room) or if we need a good night's sleep and don't want her on the bed but she has her crate to use when she wants.

 

Being honest with our adoption group about our lifestyle was key - our girl was not fostered before we got her but has been just perfect for us.

 

Can't wait to hear what you decide!

Dave (GLS DeviousDavid) - 6/27/18
Gracie (AMF Saying Grace) - 10/21/12
Bella (KT Britta) - 4/29/05 to 2/13/20

 

 

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I personally would not take time off work and would just get into a routine right off the bat so that you don't have SA-like issues when you do return to work.

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Kari and the pups.
Run free sweet Hana 9/21/08-9/12/10. Missing Sparks with every breath.
Passion 10/16/02-5/25/17

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I personally would not take time off work and would just get into a routine right off the bat so that you don't have SA-like issues when you do return to work.

 

Thanks- I meant to comment on that, too. I was going to and then had a lot of people advise me not to, and it was fine. Of course, now it's even harder to go back to work on a Monday after spending a weekend with our girl, but that's another issue ;)

Dave (GLS DeviousDavid) - 6/27/18
Gracie (AMF Saying Grace) - 10/21/12
Bella (KT Britta) - 4/29/05 to 2/13/20

 

 

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I love what most everyone else has said. I'm certainly no greyhound expert, having only had Summer since May, but I've had other dogs. And I would never habitually leave them for 11 hours. My previous dogs could hold it that long, as once in a long while I did leave them for, say, 11 hours, but only rarely, like once a year. And not on purpose, either. Summer would never hold for 11 hours. The most I seem to be able to get is 8 and it's not reliable. 4 hours is more her thing. I am also not a believer in crating or baby gating -- I've never done it with previous non-greys and I don't do it with Summer. However, Summer is not a chewer or destroyer-of-all-things. My furniture is all within 4 years of age and my carpet is a year old. We are in our dream home with our dream furniture and I have no hesitation about having pets here with us. BUT you have to accept the certainty of accidents from all orifices! I own both a compact and a full-size carpet cleaner and the full-size cleaner also has upholstery attachments. This equipment is a godsend!

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My beautiful Summer - to her forever home May 1, 2010 Summer

Certified therapy dog team with St. John Ambulance

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Unless you are willing to fence in your yard and install a dog door so the poor dog doesn't have to try to hold it for 11 hours every day - or hire a dog walker - I say you are better off getting a cat. (cats have accidents in the house too though :blush )

 

Greyhounds are wonderful, mellow houseguest - and cleaner in the home than most breeds of dogs. But with you being gone such long hours you are setting up any dog for failure once and awhile.

 

I have a nice neat and clean home - my stuff isn't chewed up and I have two Greyhounds in my home. I think they are the best thing in the world. They have been left for 9-10 hours at a time with no issues. Both have free run of the house, and are never crated. But that said, eleven hours is a much longer time period when you have a full bladder and you're anxious for your owner to return! Would you have someone in place to take the dog out if you are forced to work overtime, or you have to stop to pick up groceries on the way home and you can't make it on time?

 

When you get home from a long day at work, you still have all the normal duties of making dinner, and household chores ... etc. Without a proper fenced yard, you will need to walk the dog several times a day .... and since there is no turn out area for the dog to play and exercise in - this means that you will have to commit to an hour or more of just walking time each day, split between atleast 4 times. The dog will need to go out when it first awakes, again after it has eaten and before you go to work, immediately when you get home, and again before you go to bed at night. You will not be able to stop anywhere after work, you'll need to rush right home every single day to walk your dog.

 

Greyhounds are wonderful, wonderful, wonderful creatures - and such kind souls. They try so hard to please and are the best pets ever. I just want to make sure you are aware of how much work any dog is going to be, even "easy" ones like Greyhounds. What they add to your life is priceless - unconditional love and total devotion. They do deserve the same in return from their owner. ;)

 

If you are willing to make the necessary life changes to bring one into your home - only then should you make the commitment.

 

Well put. In addition, without a yard, you will have to walk, several -at least 4 times a day for at least 20 minutes each time. I don't know where you live but if it's where you have cold temps, you can't cut a walk short in 17 degree temps with the snow falling, wind blowing until your dog has relieved him/herself or you will be cleaning up major messes. It takes them time to find the perfect place to pee/poop. We have a fenced in yard and still walk 2-4 times a day.

 

You will have to make some major changes and allowances in your life, no doubt.

 

 

ROBIN ~ Mom to: Beau Think It Aint, Chloe JC Allthewayhome, Teddy ICU Drunk Sailor, Elsie N Fracine , Ollie RG's Travertine, Ponch A's Jupiter~ Yoshi, Zoobie & Belle, the kitties.

Waiting at the bridge Angel Polli Bohemian Ocean , Rocky, Blue,Sasha & Zoobie & Bobbi

Greyhound Angels Adoption (GAA) The Lexus Project

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Guest bellenzo

I was pretty fastidious before I got dogs 11 years ago. Very few accidents, but every now and then a dog will get sick and that can sometimes cause a mess. Some of mine chew and then grow out of it. I have a couple of books that have corners chewed off, but the company of the dogs outweighs the mess. I found that once I had the dogs I was willing to put up with more mess and sometimes destruction (without encouraging it, of course).

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It doesn't get to 17 (somewhere around -6 C) in Melbourne very often.

 

 

Good point, how about rain, like torrential rain. Still have to walk them for as long as it takes. it does rain in Melbourne, right?B)

 

 

ROBIN ~ Mom to: Beau Think It Aint, Chloe JC Allthewayhome, Teddy ICU Drunk Sailor, Elsie N Fracine , Ollie RG's Travertine, Ponch A's Jupiter~ Yoshi, Zoobie & Belle, the kitties.

Waiting at the bridge Angel Polli Bohemian Ocean , Rocky, Blue,Sasha & Zoobie & Bobbi

Greyhound Angels Adoption (GAA) The Lexus Project

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Guest Jubilee251

Echoing everyone else - you will need a dogwalker. Husband and I are out of the house 8:30 - 5:30, and we have a dogwalker come at noon to give both pups relief. Although Molly had held it for up to 12 hours, I would NEVER expect them to hold it all day, nor would I feel comfortable knowing that they might have to pee but no one is there for them.

 

I don't know if you are too anal for a greyhound - greyhounds are pretty neat and clean, but they are still dogs. If you don't exercise them enough, they may chew or scratch or become destructive. They will probably have accidents when they first come home. They will get sick and make messes, and it's not their fault.

 

Luckily, most of this is preventable - if you exercise them sufficiently (walks everyday, not just on weekends), they will be too tired to be destructive. If you start them on a reliable routine from Day 1 and work with them, they will be house-trained very quickly. If you love them like we do on this forum, you will forgive accidents and messes, holes in your slippers, and shredded magazines. Cleaning up vomit on the bedroom, walking them in -10 degree weather, dog hairs on the couch...those are NOTHING when I think of the love and laughter I get from my pups.

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I haven't read all of the responses, but will throw in my two cents. The main issue for me, coming from a rescue perspective is your work day. I think anything over 10 hours without a break is too long and frankly I think 10 is too long although I've done it on occasion. So I think you would need a dog walker for a mid-day break, especially since you have concerns about accidents.

 

That's the second concern. If you can tolerate an accident here or there, especially early on during house training or while your animal is ill, then you're probably fine but if even that is intolerable to you, then you absolutely should not get a dog. You do also need to think about what will happen as your pet ages. If he/she becomes incontinent or develops stomach sensitivities with age, will your perspectives about your belongings change? If not, again I would reconsider.

 

Otherwise, your situation seems fine with the appropriate dog. I live in a 1 bedroom condo and just make sure my pups get ample exercise via walks daily. On weekends, we tend to do longer hikes or I'll fit in a trip to a place where they can safely run off lead once a week or so. Otherwise, we do training and play with toys inside to keep them stimulated.

 

Good luck wtih your decision.

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Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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Guest Jubilee251

It doesn't get to 17 (somewhere around -6 C) in Melbourne very often.

 

 

Good point, how about rain, like torrential rain. Still have to walk them for as long as it takes. it does rain in Melbourne, right?B)

 

Oh geez, I had to walk mine a few weeks ago when Chicago had their "WORST STORM OF THE CENTURY!" hype. It wasn't Armageddon, but it was WINDY, poured like the dickens, and still we walked for an hour because both puppies needed to empty out and find the perfect poop spots. And you can't walk two large dogs and still carry an umbrella. It's all part of the fun. :rolleyes:

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Dogs and cats have accidents, they're animals. That being said, you have to be willing to put in the work and time to train a greyhound (potty and otherwise). If you feel you either don't have the time or don't want to take the time, then you're better off without one. It's not just greyhounds, it's any dog. If you feel you can, the go for it. If you have doubts, wait until you are 100% sure.

Judy, mom to Darth Vader, Bandita, And Angel

Forever in our hearts, DeeYoGee, Dani, Emmy, Andy, Heart, Saint, Valentino, Arrow, Gee, Bebe, Jilly Bean, Bullitt, Pistol, Junior, Sammie, Joey, Gizmo, Do Bee

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You may be overly worried about space issues and potential destruction. While there are no doubt dogs who do that, it's really not the norm; you have to housebreak ANY dog, and dog proof your space, but we've had dogs my entire life, and aside from the ocassional chewed chair leg, before using a crate for puppies was "invented," there really haven't been issues! A dog who receives ample exercise is usually fairly happy to sleep it's alone.

 

I will agree with the others--five days a week, 11 hours alone? I wouldn't do that. That's a long day for you, and are you REALLY going to feel like getting up early to walk the dog, and then again after your long day? And while SOME dogs can hold it that long--I don't think there is anyone who would suggest leaving a dog alone that long every day without a dog walker or a dog door is a good idea.

 

Greyhounds don't need a lot of space indoors, and "independent" they may be, but dogs are pack animals, and they really do prefer to have company even if they tend to sleep a LOT and ignore that company!

 

Why do you want a Greyhound? If the answer is that you want a lovely companion animal, than you can work around your issues.

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it might be worth suggesting that you try fostering a greyhound until it is adopted. That way you can get your 'dog legs' under you before you have made that lifetime commitment.

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Guest Rajiraj

Everyone, thank you so much for your thoughtful responses. I have found them very interesting and I'm sure I will keep re-reading them over the next days and weeks while I ponder this question.

 

Basically, your responses seem fairly unified on the question of whether 11 hours is too long - it clearly is. Your responses are more varied on the question of household accidents and damage - obviously some mistakes are inevitable but with effort and luck they can be managed and contained.

 

On the 11 hours, while I would like to tell myself that I could get home sooner and/or work from home, I don't want to base my decision in reliance on making those intentions good. A dog walker is possible, but it would add substantially to the cost of owning a dog (probably $100 per week where I live) and it would mean our lives would be to some extent 'held hostage' by the timetable of a third party. On exercise, I know that going for walks in the mornings and evenings when I work long hours might feel like a chore at times, but I was already prepared for that. We have a green space out the front of our building and a large park 5 mins walk away, so it should be an enjoyable experience most of the time. And no, it never snows in Melbourne but we do have our share of miserable weather.

 

On the house training and crating issue, my idea was only to crate during the day for the initial period. After that, the dog could have the run of the study, the kitchen and our hallway (the good furniture and rugs are in the living room and bedroom). We have floorboards throughout, so a few accidents in the other rooms are less of an issue.

 

Thanks again for your help.

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I don't think 11 hours alone in a crate every day would be good for a greyhound.

 

Housetraining from the get go is the best way to avoid a mess but accidents

are more likely to happen because of the length of time he would have to hold it.

 

I am glad you are putting a lot of thought into this but it does not sound like

a good situation for the dog or for you.

 

And this doesn't take into account the possibility of SA or some other special

need requiring more of your time.

 

How about a parakeet? :lol

 

Jenn

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