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When Are Greyhounds Considered "seniors"?


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I understand that larger breed dogs seem to age faster than the smaller ones. And many Greyhounds may already be suffering from aches and pains even when they end their racing careers. So do Greyhounds age faster than most large breeds? When do they become seniors?

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Guest PhillyPups

As I read this Gremlin came runninf up to me, stole a cookie from my hand and booked. She is a 12-1/2 year old retired brood with 45 pups - the biggest puppy in the house :lol :lol

 

I have been blessed with my seniios, mine usually start to slow down on their 13th birthday.

 

I start watching for senior behavior when they hit double digits.

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Guest fandogs

I think that really depends on the current physical condition...the past medical history... and even possibly the pedigree. (Family history of longevity).

I think that senior life starts around nine to ten years of age. (Though my 11 year old was VERY active and healthy, till a freak accident ended her life)She hadn't grayed out, or lost a step up to that time.

My current nine year old is more active than my five year old.. but she has grayed out on her face and appearance wise, shows her age more.

I don't think if the GH is generally healthy, and hasn't had any debilitating injuries, they begin senior life in the same age range as many other breeds in their size. (My Standard Schnauzer lived to be fifteen) but really became a senior at twelve, after a serious illness.

 

Thankfully, GHs don't have the lack of longevity, like Great Danes, and several other large breeds. Those dogs are often lucky to make it to nine or ten.

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Personally, to me it's when they hit double digits. Vet's though I think consider them seniors at an earlier age.

Judy, mom to Darth Vader, Bandita, And Angel

Forever in our hearts, DeeYoGee, Dani, Emmy, Andy, Heart, Saint, Valentino, Arrow, Gee, Bebe, Jilly Bean, Bullitt, Pistol, Junior, Sammie, Joey, Gizmo, Do Bee

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As I read this Gremlin came runninf up to me, stole a cookie from my hand and booked. She is a 12-1/2 year old retired brood with 45 pups - the biggest puppy in the house :lol :lol

 

I have been blessed with my seniios, mine usually start to slow down on their 13th birthday.

 

I start watching for senior behavior when they hit double digits.

 

 

:rotfl :rotfl :rotfl

Good timing, Gremlin. She had to make a statement to me!! Good Girl! Glad to hear she is still in her prime

 

 

I think that really depends on the current physical condition...the past medical history... and even possibly the pedigree. (Family history of longevity).

I think that senior life starts around nine to ten years of age. (Though my 11 year old was VERY active and healthy, till a freak accident ended her life)She hadn't grayed out, or lost a step up to that time.

My current nine year old is more active than my five year old.. but she has grayed out on her face and appearance wise, shows her age more.

I don't think if the GH is generally healthy, and hasn't had any debilitating injuries, they begin senior life in the same age range as many other breeds in their size. (My Standard Schnauzer lived to be fifteen) but really became a senior at twelve, after a serious illness.

 

Thankfully, GHs don't have the lack of longevity, like Great Danes, and several other large breeds. Those dogs are often lucky to make it to nine or ten.

 

That is encouraging to hear that even at 11, she showed no signs of aging. My one girl at six seems not to like to play as hard as her sister in the back yard most of the time.

But she is not old by anymeans! :gramps

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I think that really depends on the current physical condition...

Agreed. My Echo was acting like a senior by the time she was 7 years old. She's 9 now and acts like she's 13. :( Dazzle, on the other hand, is almost 9 and he acts like a 5 year old. Depends on the dog.

| Rachel | Dewty, Trigger, and Charlotte | Missing Dazzle, Echo, and Julio |

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Learn what your greyhound's life was like before becoming part of yours!
"The only thing better than the cutest kitty in the world is any dog." -Daniel Tosh

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Vets often consider dogs over 50 pounds to be seniors at age 7, geriatric at age 10. That means I've got one of each at my house.

 

Sam, at 10.5, is showing his age more these days. His legs get wobbly if he has to stand for long, and he's lost enough muscle tone that he's looking a bit skinny and bony on his back end. I want to put a bit of weight on him, but I don't want him to be overweight since he's constantly climbing onto the sofa and my bed, and doesn't need to be hauling any extra weight for those activities. (For years, his weight has hovered at about 65 pounds. Right now, he's at 62, and apparently those three pounds are crucial to how he looks.)

 

But I'm no longer inflicting consecutive days-out trips on him. Both dogs had long car rides and a 4-hour M&G on Saturday. On Sunday, Sam got to stay home, while Jacey, age 7.5, went with me for another M&G session sandwiched between long drives to and from. But it was pretty warm, and even she was knocked out at the end of it and slept all the way home.

15060353021_97558ce7da.jpg
Kathy and Q (CRT Qadeer from Fuzzy's Cannon and CRT Bonnie) and
Jane (WW's Aunt Jane from Trent Lee and Aunt M); photos to come.

Missing Silver (5.19.2005-10.27.2016), Tigger (4.5.2007-3.18.2016),
darling Sam (5.10.2000-8.8.2013), Jacey-Kasey (5.19.2003-8.22.2011), and Oreo (1997-3.30.2006)

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Veterinarians like to run "senior blood panels" on dogs much younger than I would consider a dog a senior. Not sure if there is any valid reason for it, but I know senior blood work is more expensive than non-senior!

 

George is no different at 8 than he was at 5, except for his distinguished silver face!


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Susan,  Hamish,  Mister Bigglesworth and Nikita Stanislav. Missing Ming, George, and Buck

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Vets often consider dogs over 50 pounds to be seniors at age 7, geriatric at age 10. That means I've got one of each at my house.

 

Sam, at 10.5, is showing his age more these days. His legs get wobbly if he has to stand for long, and he's lost enough muscle tone that he's looking a bit skinny and bony on his back end. I want to put a bit of weight on him, but I don't want him to be overweight since he's constantly climbing onto the sofa and my bed, and doesn't need to be hauling any extra weight for those activities. (For years, his weight has hovered at about 65 pounds. Right now, he's at 62, and apparently those three pounds are crucial to how he looks.)

 

But I'm no longer inflicting consecutive days-out trips on him. Both dogs had long car rides and a 4-hour M&G on Saturday. On Sunday, Sam got to stay home, while Jacey, age 7.5, went with me for another M&G session sandwiched between long drives to and from. But it was pretty warm, and even she was knocked out at the end of it and slept all the way home.

 

 

Yes, my former girl was this way wobbly when she turned about 9. My girls also have an amazing nights sleep as well as the next day when we do a Greyhound event with a long ride.

 

Veterinarians like to run "senior blood panels" on dogs much younger than I would consider a dog a senior. Not sure if there is any valid reason for it, but I know senior blood work is more expensive than non-senior!

 

George is no different at 8 than he was at 5, except for his distinguished silver face!

 

Thank you. I kind of feel this too. Interesting about the blood work price. They sock it to you when you get old, especially a senior human!

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Wanted to mention...some groups promote November as Senior Dog Month (or, often, Adopt-a-Senior month). My vet would run lab tests on dogs 7 and older at a reduced price in November. He once pretended my 6-year-old was 7 because she could have a more extensive test for less money. Ask your vets.

 

My vet does senior wellness exams on dogs of any age before they have anesthesia. I think the difference between the senior and the non-senior tests is a urinalysis.

15060353021_97558ce7da.jpg
Kathy and Q (CRT Qadeer from Fuzzy's Cannon and CRT Bonnie) and
Jane (WW's Aunt Jane from Trent Lee and Aunt M); photos to come.

Missing Silver (5.19.2005-10.27.2016), Tigger (4.5.2007-3.18.2016),
darling Sam (5.10.2000-8.8.2013), Jacey-Kasey (5.19.2003-8.22.2011), and Oreo (1997-3.30.2006)

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Guest KennelMom

Large breed dogs are usually considered (by vets) to be seniors at 7 simply because their lifespan isn't expected to be as long as a smaller breed. If you have a range of 10-12,then 7 years old is starting to be the beginning of the end.

 

However, practically speaking, I consider them seniors at 10 and "super seniors" at 13.

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