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Lymphoplasmocytic Inflamation Of The Gums


Guest BooBooMama
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Guest BooBooMama

Deeni had awful teeth when she came from the track. After her dental she lost 9 of her 12 premolars. Since then she has tried two different antibiotics, (two Convenia injections and two 10 day treatments of Clindamycin then switching to pulsing for one week each month), brushing nightly with PetzLife gel AND spraying daily with the PetzLife spray, swabbing her gum line with Chlorhexidine gel (with the vitamin C crystals) nightly, then switched to Biotene and swabbing that along her gum line every night.

 

Her gums look only a little better but still infected. OSU told me that she may have Lymphoplasmocytic Inflammation which should be treatable with medication. I have an appointment with a veterinary dental specialist in Madison next week. Has anyone else had a diagnosis of Lymphoplasmocytic Inflammation? If so, what medication have you used?

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Try searching on stomatitis. My senior Greyhound, Luke, had lymphoplasmacytic stomatitis. His body seemed to not be able to put up any defenses to fend off plaque and all my dental care was not enough to prevent recurrence. Yet his body reacted with the terrible inflammation & often ulcers. It is hard to do a good brushing or much other mouth care if a dog is hurting from this. He also had chronic lymphocytic leukemia and this possibly caused or contributed to the LPS but that was just speculation.

 

A veterinary dentist gave the best cleanings and that was the most helpful item when followed up by a rigorous at home dental regimen including daily brushings, chlorhexidine gel, dental chews, etc. If I slacked up on any part and later even if I didn't, plaque would form & any amount set the process in motion again. He only lost one tooth & that was from an epulide. However, by the age of 13 yo the problem was getting so much worse that I was at the point of thinking he would be much better off without any teeth then dealing with that. Though immunosuppressive drugs may have helped his gums, I was not prepared to try them since he his CLL which already weakened his immune system.

 

Hope the dentist is able to greatly improve things for your pup.

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Had a cat with it and lost him to complications for long term use of Prednisone to control the inflammation. Had I to do it all over again, I would have had all of his teeth pulled because he had a hard time eating was very, very uncomfortable. But, before doing anything that extreme, consider a biopsy to get a firm dx. A friend's dog has beautiful teeth because she tends to them every day, without fail, but the worst gums and breath like a sewer. Pulsing with antibiotics helps, but it's not a cure.

Linda, Mom to Fuzz, Barkley, and the felines Miss Kitty, Simon and Joseph.Waiting at The Bridge: Alex, Josh, Harley, Nikki, Beemer, Anna, Frank, Rachel, my heart & soul, Suze and the best boy ever, Dalton.<p>

:candle ....for all those hounds that are sick, hurt, lost or waiting for their forever homes. SENIORS ROCK :rivethead

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Guest BooBooMama

Try searching on stomatitis. My senior Greyhound, Luke, had lymphoplasmacytic stomatitis. His body seemed to not be able to put up any defenses to fend off plaque and all my dental care was not enough to prevent recurrence. Yet his body reacted with the terrible inflammation & often ulcers. It is hard to do a good brushing or much other mouth care if a dog is hurting from this. He also had chronic lymphocytic leukemia and this possibly caused or contributed to the LPS but that was just speculation.

 

A veterinary dentist gave the best cleanings and that was the most helpful item when followed up by a rigorous at home dental regimen including daily brushings, chlorhexidine gel, dental chews, etc. If I slacked up on any part and later even if I didn't, plaque would form & any amount set the process in motion again. He only lost one tooth & that was from an epulide. However, by the age of 13 yo the problem was getting so much worse that I was at the point of thinking he would be much better off without any teeth then dealing with that. Though immunosuppressive drugs may have helped his gums, I was not prepared to try them since he his CLL which already weakened his immune system.

 

Hope the dentist is able to greatly improve things for your pup.

 

Poor Luke! I am so sorry that he has had to deal with so many illnesses all at once. Deeni had a full blood work-up when I adopted her- no signs of leukemia (thank God!) I am keeping up with the daily cleanings and see SOME benefits. At first I was brushing every other day because of the bleeding but then I saw plaque was beginning to form on her last back molars so I started doing it daily. I want the dentist to tell me if I am doing the right thing by cleaning and antibiotic "pulsing' or if we should just pull them all out. She is only 4 so I have time to seek out treatment before I make the final decision. It just helps to hear what others have already tried. Thanks.

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Guest BooBooMama

Had a cat with it and lost him to complications for long term use of Prednisone to control the inflammation. Had I to do it all over again, I would have had all of his teeth pulled because he had a hard time eating was very, very uncomfortable. But, before doing anything that extreme, consider a biopsy to get a firm dx. A friend's dog has beautiful teeth because she tends to them every day, without fail, but the worst gums and breath like a sewer. Pulsing with antibiotics helps, but it's not a cure.

 

Deeni's teeth are perfect looking and her breath smells like the raw meat I feed her- not pretty but not related to her gums. She chomps away on raw bones with no signs of discomfort- but her gums are ugly looking and bleed every time I brush her teeth. I have begun to see some signs of healing since I started doing her dentals twice a day and the antibiotics may be helping as well. I guess I want the dentist to give me options before I decide to pull out all of her teeth. He may insist on a biopsy or he may just feel that it is so obvious that we do not need one- we shall see. It helps to hear what others have been through. Thanks.

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