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We've had Maggie since Thanksgiving. No problems with food aggression or any other type of aggression. Bought her a nylabone last week. She licked it but no interest in chewing it. Today I gave her a bully stick for the first time. Since she has GI issues, I didn't want her to eat the whole thing until I know that it doesn't cause her any issues. When DH went to take it away from her, she growled and snapped at him. She then took it and went to another room. I've never dealt with this issue before with any of my dogs. I'd like to give it back to her after I know it doesn't cause tummy issues but not sure how to deal with this new behavior. (We did finally get it from her using our feet on it while she was laying down chewing it. She was then frantically sniffing and looking for it.)

 

Suggestions please.

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I don't usually come to this forum,,, as each has their own ideas on behavior and training,,, but I think using you foot and standing on it to "claim it" is very wise,,, I know many use the "trading up" method,,, not for me,,,, when I want something,,, I WANT IT NOW,

for safety reasons,,,, I would continue with using you feet,, if you feel uncomfortable, reachng for it,,, practice this method, over and over,,, I don't speek, I just stand on it, I don't slide it away,,, I wait until the dog moves away I also would make it a point to remove the pups food right in the middle of feeding,,,, to see what type of a response you get,,,, above all show no fear good luck :)

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Guest mbfilby

This is common. She has something she really really enjoys and you are trying to take it away..

 

You need to teach drop it, and to "Trade Up" which is exchanging the item you want for something better (from the hounds point of view).

 

Eventually she should be able to "drop it" without having to trade up.

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This is common. She has something she really really enjoys and you are trying to take it away..

 

You need to teach drop it, and to "Trade Up" which is exchanging the item you want for something better (from the hounds point of view).

 

Eventually she should be able to "drop it" without having to trade up.

:nod Carl would do this with bones, too. I would "trade" him for a cookie. Now he lets me take away bones, if needed. It just took some practice.

Sunsands Doodles: Doodles aka Claire, Bella Run Softly: Softy aka Bowie (the Diamond Dog)

Missing my beautiful boy Sunsands Carl 2.25.2003 - 4.1.2014

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This is common. She has something she really really enjoys and you are trying to take it away..

 

You need to teach drop it, and to "Trade Up" which is exchanging the item you want for something better (from the hounds point of view).

 

Eventually she should be able to "drop it" without having to trade up.

:nod Carl would do this with bones, too. I would "trade" him for a cookie. Now he lets me take away bones, if needed. It just took some practice.

Unfortunately, in her mind, there was nothing worth trading for. We tried treats, etc.

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I've always used the trading method as well. I know some people say they should be able to take anything their dog has with out a fuss from the dog. In theory, I agree, but I also think it's a little unfair (I know, human emotion) to take something really good away with out offering something in return.

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I had the same problem with Capri. There simply was NO higher value treats than rawhide/bullystick/bone. She's clever enough to know when I'm trying to bribe her, too, so luring also did not work. I basically just make really sure it's okay for her to have something before I give it to her.

 

(Which isn't to say I haven't reached into her mouth to pull out something she picked up on a walk. I have. But you have to be willing to accept the consequences, and I just hope and pray that she understands that on the rare occasion when I do that it's because it's SUPER important.)

Sharon, Loki, Freyja, Capri (bridge angel and most beloved heart dog), Ajax (bridge angel) and Sweetie Pie (cat)

Visit Hound-Safe.com by Something Special Pet Supplies for muzzles and other dog safety products

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This is common. She has something she really really enjoys and you are trying to take it away..

 

You need to teach drop it, and to "Trade Up" which is exchanging the item you want for something better (from the hounds point of view).

 

Eventually she should be able to "drop it" without having to trade up.

:nod Carl would do this with bones, too. I would "trade" him for a cookie. Now he lets me take away bones, if needed. It just took some practice.

 

 

Yep, this works great. I would tell mine to drop it, offer the cookie or other goodie and when they dropped the item, I would praise them and give them the cookie. Once they let go of the object you want them to drop, it's important to treat immediately and tell them what a good dog they are. You do this a few times and they catch on really quickly so all you have to do eventually is say drop it.

Judy, mom to Darth Vader, Bandita, And Angel

Forever in our hearts, DeeYoGee, Dani, Emmy, Andy, Heart, Saint, Valentino, Arrow, Gee, Bebe, Jilly Bean, Bullitt, Pistol, Junior, Sammie, Joey, Gizmo, Do Bee

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Guest Bang_o_rama

The common denominator here is the bully stick. I think that if Mother Teresa were a dog, she'd growl if someone went for her bully stick. The nickname "doggie crack" is indeed apropos.

~D~

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Guest sheila

whenever I've needed to take something from a dog the first thing I do is get the dogs attention on me by saying their name and THEN I take the object. I think if your DH just reached over and tried to take the bully stick with no warning the dogs reaction is normal.

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I don't usually come to this forum,,, as each has their own ideas on behavior and training,,, but I think using you foot and standing on it to "claim it" is very wise,,, I know many use the "trading up" method,,, not for me,,,, when I want something,,, I WANT IT NOW,

 

Understandable. But to the dog, that is being a bully - the dog only knows that you are trying to take away something very high value, that you gave them. This is confusing.

 

Rather than bullying the dog, train them using the "trade-up" method. With time and practice, the dog should willingly give up any prize, expecting something better!

 

This is common. She has something she really really enjoys and you are trying to take it away..

 

You need to teach drop it, and to "Trade Up" which is exchanging the item you want for something better (from the hounds point of view).

 

Eventually she should be able to "drop it" without having to trade up.

:nod Carl would do this with bones, too. I would "trade" him for a cookie. Now he lets me take away bones, if needed. It just took some practice.

Unfortunately, in her mind, there was nothing worth trading for. We tried treats, etc.

 

What is the "etc?"

 

Regular, biscuit type treats are useless for this. The bully stick is MUCH better. Try cold-cut meats, cheese, tuna, peanut butter, cream cheese, or anything else nice and smelly that is only brought out for things like this. Dry biscuits would not get my attention, but peanut butter might!

Sarah, the human, Henley, and Armani the Borzoi boys, and Brubeck the Deerhound.
Always in our hearts, Gunnar, Naples the Greyhounds, Cooper and Manero, the Borzoi, and King-kitty, at the Rainbow Bridge.

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Guest kelli123

I totally agree with all above posts. When it taste so good you don't want to give it up You will protect it with your life. I never just grab anything with out trading up . After all I don't let DBF take my ice cream. I think its pretty common when you get something so so good you could die for it .

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Guest mbfilby

Another stupid question.....what is a bully stick? Never heard of such a thing. But they must be really, really, really good.

 

Dried Bull junk.. :puke

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Couple hints with teaching "Drop it!" -1- Start with something the dog doesn't want. An old washcloth. If he won't take it from you, just set it down between his front paws, cheerful "Drop it!", take the washcloth, "Good boy!" + delicious treat, AND GIVE THE WASHCLOTH RIGHT BACK. First lesson, repeat that 8-10 times. Next lesson (perhaps next day), do the washcloth a few times and then move on to maybe a toy that he sort of likes. Same procedure. Always give the object right back. Any object he balks on, go back to the previous object, repeat a couple times, then work on the balk object until he's thrilled to give it to you for a piece of cheddar cheese. Etc. etc. You can really have some fun teaching this, and practicing from time to time so it's there when you really need it.

Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
We miss Reko Batman (Trouper Zeke x Marque Louisiana), 11/15/95-6/29/06, Rocco the thistledown whippet, 04/29/93-10/14/08, Reko Zema (Mo Kick x Reko Princess), 8/16/98-4/18/10, the most beautiful girl in the whole USA, my good egg Joseph aka Won by a Nose (Oneco Cufflink x Buy Back), 09/22/2003-03/01/2013, and our gentle sweet Gidget (Digitizer, Dodgem by Design x Sobe Mulberry), 1/29/2006-11/22/2014, gone much too soon. Never forgetting CJC's Buckshot, 1/2/07-10/25/10.

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Guest Swifthounds

What Batmom said. :D All the way.

 

 

Dogs do not know what you haven't taught them. If you haven't taught them to release low value items, they sure won't release a high value item. You can step on it, demand it, offer something in return ad nauseum, but if you haven't given the them training and the framework for understanding the rules, the only thing they know is that you're a bully and can't be trusted. The worst thing you can do with a dog is teach it that the biggest bully wins - because not only does that do violence to the human/dog bond, but that biggest bully may not always be you.

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Another stupid question.....what is a bully stick? Never heard of such a thing. But they must be really, really, really good.

 

Dried Bull junk.. :puke

 

LOL In case that didn't answer your question, it's a dried bull hoo-hoo. :blush

 

Jenn

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Another stupid question.....what is a bully stick? Never heard of such a thing. But they must be really, really, really good.

 

Dried Bull junk.. :puke

 

LOL In case that didn't answer your question, it's a dried bull hoo-hoo. :blush

 

Jenn

 

Actually, according to GT lingo, bulls by definition don't have hoo-hoos. It's a dried bull schmeckie. :P (Bet you're sorry you asked, huh? ;) )

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With Cocoa (DC Chocolatedrop), missing B for Beth (2006-2015)
And kitties C.J., Klara, Bernadette, John-Boy, & Sinbad

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I think if your DH just reached over and tried to take the bully stick with no warning the dogs reaction is normal.

 

Yep. :nod

 

And to my mind, you're no safer using your foot. Dogs are just as happy to bite feet as hands, you know. :P In fact, some dogs are even more touchy about feet coming near their faces than hands. Be very, very careful doing that.

 

 

Unfortunately, in her mind, there was nothing worth trading for. We tried treats, etc.

 

What is the "etc?"

 

Regular, biscuit type treats are useless for this. The bully stick is MUCH better. Try cold-cut meats, cheese, tuna, peanut butter, cream cheese, or anything else nice and smelly that is only brought out for things like this. Dry biscuits would not get my attention, but peanut butter might!

 

 

Yep again. We use cooked sausage, ham, cold cooked turkey, stinky cheese - whatever we find that particular dog craves and doesn't usually have. Find it - there will be something! The thing about bully sticks is that they'll still be there after she's scarfed down the soft, extremely tasty treat, and she knows that.

 

It's a dog's nature to swallow the quick-to-eat food first, then deal with the one that needs more work, but be very careful not to teach her that she has to hang onto that bully stick at all costs or someone sneakily steals it. Dogs, by nature, are very very good at resource guarding and it can bring out the worst in them. Let's face it, in an out and out battle with a dog, you're going to lose. Use your best weapon - your intelligence and cunning. We humans have more of it than dogs do, and it's our best shot. ;)

 

 

Couple hints with teaching "Drop it!" -1- Start with something the dog doesn't want. An old washcloth. If he won't take it from you, just set it down between his front paws, cheerful "Drop it!", take the washcloth, "Good boy!" + delicious treat, AND GIVE THE WASHCLOTH RIGHT BACK. First lesson, repeat that 8-10 times. Next lesson (perhaps next day), do the washcloth a few times and then move on to maybe a toy that he sort of likes. Same procedure. Always give the object right back. Any object he balks on, go back to the previous object, repeat a couple times, then work on the balk object until he's thrilled to give it to you for a piece of cheddar cheese. Etc. etc. You can really have some fun teaching this, and practicing from time to time so it's there when you really need it.

 

Exactly right. :nod And the giving it right back is most important. You're teaching trust, as well as 'drop it'.

 

What Batmom said. :D All the way.

 

 

Dogs do not know what you haven't taught them. If you haven't taught them to release low value items, they sure won't release a high value item. You can step on it, demand it, offer something in return ad nauseum, but if you haven't given the them training and the framework for understanding the rules, the only thing they know is that you're a bully and can't be trusted. The worst thing you can do with a dog is teach it that the biggest bully wins - because not only does that do violence to the human/dog bond, but that biggest bully may not always be you.

 

Couldn't agree more!

 

 

We do a lot of trust work with new dogs, and then food manners are the very first thing I teach them. They are SO important.

 

I never give a new dog something outright without holding onto it for a second or two to make sure they know it's mine, and I'm choosing to give it to them. I teach them not to snatch by offering it in my closed fist and making them work at getting my fingers undone. No teeth allowed, or we go back a stage, but they must be able to get it in the end by the right behaviour. I keep one hand on their shoulder when I put their dinner down, until they begin eating. I go to them in the middle of their dinner to toss something even better into the bowl, touching them as I do so. I sit on the floor with them and give them small soft treats that they can swallow quickly.

 

All these things are done one step at a time, and until the 'food manners' training is completely learned and I'm sure they're good with it, I never, ever give them something like a pig ear or a bully stick unless I can let them eat it all, right then and there.

 

Following this protocol, I've been able to take desirable things from my dogs, any time I like, even the most highly prized stuff - like dragging half a cooked chicken quarter out of their throats on a walk (or the meatball Sid found in the park recently), but you have to do the training first.

 

Taking food away from a dog is an aggressive move. You need to teach your dog quite a lot of stuff before you can attempt it, or you run the risk of teaching them things you really don't want them to learn, IMHO.

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Another stupid question.....what is a bully stick? Never heard of such a thing. But they must be really, really, really good.

 

Dried Bull junk.. :puke

 

LOL In case that didn't answer your question, it's a dried bull hoo-hoo. :blush

 

Jenn

 

Actually, according to GT lingo, bulls by definition don't have hoo-hoos. It's a dried bull schmeckie. :P (Bet you're sorry you asked, huh? ;) )

 

 

Sorry to butt in again about the bully stick, dried bull junk, hoo-hoo, schmeckie, but if it's what I'm guessing.......does it get ingested entirely, or does

one just chew on it & make it all gross & slimy & stinky?

Blessed is the person who has earned the love of an old dog.

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Guest LindsaySF

Completely agreed with Batmom, Swifthounds, and Silverfish.

 

 

but I think using you foot and standing on it to "claim it" is very wise,,, I know many use the "trading up" method,,, not for me,,,, when I want something,,, I WANT IT NOW,

for safety reasons,,,, I would continue with using you feet,, if you feel uncomfortable, reachng for it,,, practice this method, over and over,,, I don't speek, I just stand on it, I don't slide it away,,, I wait until the dog moves away

Wow. I am sorry but this is horrible advice. It's only a matter of time before you pull back a bloody stump that used to be your foot. A dog defending something will still bite your foot you know, it is not any safer than using your hands. You've just been lucky apparently that your dogs give in to you, most dogs won't.

 

What will you do if the dog won't move away and instead attacks your foot? Lily's foster mom tried this foot method also, guess how well it worked? :lol She just stopped giving her toys completely because she couldn't get them back and Lily kept attacking her. Gee, in a week at my house Lily learned drop it and I can take food and bones from her. :)

 

 

I also would make it a point to remove the pups food right in the middle of feeding,,,, to see what type of a response you get,,,, above all show no fear

Umm.... So what do you do if the "response" you happen to get is the dog biting the crap out of you? In regards to your other thread about fostering, I highly recommend you not foster any dogs while you have this mentality, you'll get them labeled a biter in no time.

 

 

 

 

~Lindsay~

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Guest gecko_foot

Couple hints with teaching "Drop it!" -1- Start with something the dog doesn't want. An old washcloth. If he won't take it from you, just set it down between his front paws, cheerful "Drop it!", take the washcloth, "Good boy!" + delicious treat, AND GIVE THE WASHCLOTH RIGHT BACK. First lesson, repeat that 8-10 times. Next lesson (perhaps next day), do the washcloth a few times and then move on to maybe a toy that he sort of likes. Same procedure. Always give the object right back. Any object he balks on, go back to the previous object, repeat a couple times, then work on the balk object until he's thrilled to give it to you for a piece of cheddar cheese. Etc. etc. You can really have some fun teaching this, and practicing from time to time so it's there when you really need it.

 

Great advice! :thumbs-up

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Another stupid question.....what is a bully stick? Never heard of such a thing. But they must be really, really, really good.

 

Dried Bull junk.. :puke

 

LOL In case that didn't answer your question, it's a dried bull hoo-hoo. :blush

 

Jenn

 

Actually, according to GT lingo, bulls by definition don't have hoo-hoos. It's a dried bull schmeckie. :P (Bet you're sorry you asked, huh? ;) )

 

 

Sorry to butt in again about the bully stick, dried bull junk, hoo-hoo, schmeckie, but if it's what I'm guessing.......does it get ingested entirely, or does

one just chew on it & make it all gross & slimy & stinky?

 

A bully stick is simply a dried bull penis. Dogs love them

Wendy and The Whole Wherd. American by birth, Southern by choice.
"Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup!"
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Thanks for all the advice everyone. I guess we will start working on "drop it" before she gets the bully stick back. I guess we've just been lucky with all the other dogs we've had including two other greys, lab, poodle and bichons. Never had an issue before Miss Maggie and her "penis". She's not food aggressive, toy aggressive or sleep aggressive at all. Just the bully stick.

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