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Marrow Bones Ok?


Guest SuperiorItaly
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Guest Swifthounds

Both are WrecK bones, so if you're already assuming that risk,there's not much difference - except that a jointed bone might have beneficial cartilage.

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Guest SuperiorItaly

Gee, I hope so! George gets one every Saturday and Sunday!

 

Yes, is the answer to your question. Enjoy!

 

Thanks! Little Italy is enjoying one right now.

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Guest ChicagoCanine

I prefer to use knuckle bones because of the cartilage, and the marrow type have no soft areas to chew on so I worry more about their teeth when they chew those.

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Both are WrecK bones, so if you're already assuming that risk,there's not much difference - except that a jointed bone might have beneficial cartilage.

 

I'm in agreement with Swifthounds -- there are real risks with giving marrow bones: slab fractures and premature wearing down of teeth among others. This topic has been discussed here before, and those posts are worth searching out. There are other bones and chews that provide entertainment and dental benefits without such substantial risks.

 

As another dog owner posted elsewhere, "how to turn a $2.50 bone into a $2500.00 vet bill" (her hound required abdominal surgery).

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Guest Swifthounds

I'm in agreement with Swifthounds -- there are real risks with giving marrow bones: slab fractures and premature wearing down of teeth among others. This topic has been discussed here before, and those posts are worth searching out. There are other bones and chews that provide entertainment and dental benefits without such substantial risks.

 

As another dog owner posted elsewhere, "how to turn a $2.50 bone into a $2500.00 vet bill" (her hound required abdominal surgery).

 

:nod

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Guest GoingRogue

Rogue doesn't really chew on his marrow bone. He works hard to get everything out of it and is pretty much done. We were buying the ones at pet stores with the filling in them. I started filling his marrows myself. He gets the peanut butter or whatever we put in it out and leaves the bones so we can fill them again. He stays busy for hours working on them. :colgate

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You make a good point, Tracy, that it depends to some extent on the individual dog. I have two enthusiastic/aggressive chewers here. In fact, one of Simba's nicknames is Jaws.

 

When he first came home, I had a slew of toys waiting for him. This industrial-strength Kong Wubba lasted less than 20 minutes before it was in dangerous shape and needed to be tossed.

 

PICT0199.jpg

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Both are WrecK bones, so if you're already assuming that risk,there's not much difference - except that a jointed bone might have beneficial cartilage.

 

I'm in agreement with Swifthounds -- there are real risks with giving marrow bones: slab fractures and premature wearing down of teeth among others. This topic has been discussed here before, and those posts are worth searching out. There are other bones and chews that provide entertainment and dental benefits without such substantial risks.

 

As another dog owner posted elsewhere, "how to turn a $2.50 bone into a $2500.00 vet bill" (her hound required abdominal surgery).

 

 

What alternative to marrow or knuckle bones are usually recommended for dogs that enjoy chewing? Other than rawhide which I don't want to use.

Edited by vmom
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What alternative to marrow or knuckle bones are usually recommended for dogs that enjoy chewing? Other than rawhide which I don't want to use.

 

Pork shoulder. It's large and messy, but your hound can eventually devour the whole thing. It's got a nice mix of meat and soft bone (RMB), all of which can be consumed.

 

Bully sticks (dehydrated bull's penis) is all natural. Sold by Hare Today.

 

Bully Sticks from Hare Today

 

Duck necks, chicken necks, duck feet and chicken feet have cartilage that are nice snack items. They are not a huge workout for your dog, but they are healthy and are reasonably good for teeth cleaning. I prefer the duck, as they are larger.

 

Pork neck bones are nice. I just picked up some for $1.09 per pound. Lot's of meat.

 

There is a big debate on this site about marrow bones. Some of us feel they are too hard and can cause tooth fractures and erosion. Others feel they are not a problem. After hearing both sides, I would be careful with marrow bones if your hound's teeth are in bad shape. I would also exercise caution (supervision) when they are given to your dogs. Just my two cents.

Edited by RWM
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