Jump to content

Leash Pulling


Guest hshirlow
 Share

Recommended Posts

Guest hshirlow

Sunshine used to be a beautiful walker - right beside me, no pulling, no cutting across me. Now that she's gained confidence, she's become an obnoxious companion to walk! She pulls, stops every second to smell something, cuts in front of my so abruptly that I trip over her or walk up her heels. I've thought of getting a harness in hopes that would help. I've stopped when she's pulling and waited for the leash to slacken before I begin walking again - it doesn't seem to help. She is just too anxious to get places and doesn't care what misery she puts me through in the process!

 

Any advice? I'm so glad she is less nervous, but I just can't tolerate the tug of war.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do you have the leash held short so she is right beside you?

Is this an exercise walk or a potty walk? With an exercise walk I allow very few sniff stops, otherwise Gracie would mark mark mark the whole way.

 

Hada the podenco maneta, Georgie Girl (UMR Cordella), Lulu the podenco andaluz, Rita the podenco maneta
Angels: Charlie the iggy,  Mazy (CBR Crazy Girl), Potato, my mystery ibizan girl, Allen (M's Pretty Boy), Percy (Fast But True), Mikey (Doray's Patuti), Pudge le mutt, Tessa the iggy, Possum (Apostle), Gracie (Dusty Lady), Harold (Slatex Harold), "Cousin" Simon our step-iggy, Little Dude the iggy ,Bandit (Bb Blue Jay), Niña the galgo, Wally (Allen Hogg), Thane (Pog Mo Thoine), Oliver (JJ Special Agent), Comet, & Rosie our original mutt.

tiny hada siggy.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a wonderful no-pull harness made by Wiggles Wags and Whiskers. The model I have is the "Classic" harness and I'm thrilled with it (it's NOT the harness in my signature, though, that one is a cheap PetSmart one that I didn't like). Here's the website: WW&W. The harnesses are martingale style, which is really effective. Plus the part behind the legs is all lined with velvet!

 

Here's Summer in her WW&W harness, with her Daddy. Sorry it doesn't show a lot of the harness.

 

IMG_0259.jpg

Edited by OwnedBySummer

SummerGreytalkSignatureResized-1.jpg

Lisa B.

My beautiful Summer - to her forever home May 1, 2010 Summer

Certified therapy dog team with St. John Ambulance

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest bellenzo

Don't give up, sometimes it takes a lot of patience with a puller. Like you, I now have a puller as well and will need to help him understand the appropriate way to walk. I'll probably start by helping him to focus on me through positive reinforcement, with treats and other good things. Hopefully he will soon learn that all the good things happen next to me and not somewhere "out there." Also, don't forget that she's not trying to make you miserable, she just doesn't know yet what the expectation is. All the best.

Edited by bellenzo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest mcsheltie

The minute they start to pull I walk backwards. The dog turns around and comes toward me. Then I start to walk forward again and that swings the dog into the perfect heel position. I give a tiny treat and walk on. I try to use the leash as little as possible while doing this. I'll keep my hand stationery at my side, when I feel pressure I back up.

 

You will have to repeat this over and over at first. But soon they get the message that they will be going the other way every time they pull.

 

This method gives you a choice of how strict you want to be. As you can use it for any position from "perfect" heel to walking ahead of you with a loose lead.

 

Couple this with "watch me" training and you will have pleasant walks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest KennelMom

I'd get rid of the harness if you want to decrease pulling. There's a reason they put harness on dogs that are pulling sleds and things. It maximizes pulling ability and strength.

 

Put her on a 1 inch martingale so she can more quickly and easily feel tension on the leash.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest jaws4evr

Well, firstly keeping the leash shorter so she CAN'T cut infront of you will help. And if she tries to bump you out of the way, let her bump into you but don't yield to her.

 

For sniffing, say her name and tug her forward. If she doesn't move along, then keep walking so she has no choice. Don't be violent about it, just keep a brisk pace with a loose but shortish leash so she has no option other than to come along.

 

For the pulling, if the stop-walking approach doesn't work, start turning the other direction instead. If she applies tension, turn around and walk the other way, forcing her to change direction and keep up. Make right turns and dead stops too, mix it up so she has no option other than to pay attention. Again no whiplash-violence, just walk with purpose without letting her govern pace or direction.

 

It does come down to consistency... Never ever let her pull you to anything. If there's a person/dog/sniffy spot she wants, do NOT let her pull you to get there... If she is allowed to apply tension towards something she wants, and she is allowed to get there during this tension, it's a huge reinforcement to pull to where she wants to go. It does take a lot of time for this to sink in, but if your'e consistent and patient you should see progress.

 

As for harness/collar, either can work... It's down to preference. I prefer the control of a martingale collar, but those things come down to preference of dog and handler IMO. BUT, something to consider is a harness's original prupose was to encourage pulling... ie, sledding... Not saying that harness = pulling, but loose leash walking is 95% training, not tool.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Perhaps the harness works so well for me because Summer is not a puller. And the harness isn't making her want to. But this particular harness I mentioned DOES have a martingale feature, giving you control. She had to learn to wear it, of course, as it was a new way of walking. And sometimes she DOES pull to get to a sniffy spot but a quick snap of the leash and hence a tightening of the girth band and she stops. I dislike walking any dog, greyhound or not, with a collar. Especially a puller. One dog I had who was a really bad puller and very, very strong, I used to walk with a Halti but I don't think they'd fit the greyhound. I eventually taught the Halti dog to stop pulling and I did it the way that other posts have remarked -- by randomly turning and changing directions and stopping and starting. She HAD to pay attention. With a grey, whether with a plain harness, a martingale harness or a martingale collar, I would do exactly the same thing.

Edited by OwnedBySummer

SummerGreytalkSignatureResized-1.jpg

Lisa B.

My beautiful Summer - to her forever home May 1, 2010 Summer

Certified therapy dog team with St. John Ambulance

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest greytloves

The minute they start to pull I walk backwards. The dog turns around and comes toward me. Then I start to walk forward again and that swings the dog into the perfect heel position. I give a tiny treat and walk on. I try to use the leash as little as possible while doing this. I'll keep my hand stationery at my side, when I feel pressure I back up.

 

You will have to repeat this over and over at first. But soon they get the message that they will be going the other way every time they pull.

 

This method gives you a choice of how strict you want to be. As you can use it for any position from "perfect" heel to walking ahead of you with a loose lead.

 

Couple this with "watch me" training and you will have pleasant walks.

 

ditto! Also, when training alternate fast and slow without a pattern. Just say "with me", keep a loose leash, but do not let them get in front of you. Loose leash to your side, kept on the left with a "with me". I am training our little pit/lab puppy and she really wants to pull. Now she is realizing pulling means we stop and then go the other way for a few steps. Stop. I say "with me" and go again. If she pulls we repeat. It has taken a long time sometimes to go from driveway to house, but she is understanding. So, patience and consistency is key.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest hshirlow

Thanks! I will definitely try the turning around method. We walk for fun, not for bathroom purposes, so I want to make these walks a pleasure again. Sunshine is a smart girl and so wanting to please, so I think I just need persistence. :-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i agree w/ kennel mom 100%. with a puller i do all of the above and use the 3/4" lupine martingale collars. they are cheap, fasionable and have a life time warrantee. also, you need to use a leash that you can grip that won't slip out of your hand. i personally HATE nylon leashes. i go for washable cotton web leads or leather. max200, an agility site has excellent prices on both, that's were many obedience schools get their goods.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest mcsheltie

also, you need to use a leash that you can grip that won't slip out of your hand. i personally HATE nylon leashes.

I do too. But Wiggles Wags & Whiskers' nylon leashes are really soft and don't pull thru or burn your hands. They will make them with the scissor type snap too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Sweetreba

[((((((((((

For the pulling, if the stop-walking approach doesn't work, start turning the other direction instead. If she applies tension, turn around and walk the other way, forcing her to change direction and keep up. Make right turns and dead stops too, mix it up so she has no option other than to pay attention. Again no whiplash-violence, just walk with purpose without letting her govern pace or direction.

 

 

I agree with Jaws4evr.

This is how I broke my Petey from pulling. My girl was always a good walker. It only took a couple weeks. When you keep turning and mix it up they get to the point of feeling so confused they start paying attention. It just becomes habit to pay attention to what I am going to do. If I stop they stop, if I turn they turn. No problems anymore.

Edited by Sweetreba
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd get rid of the harness if you want to decrease pulling. There's a reason they put harness on dogs that are pulling sleds and things. It maximizes pulling ability and strength.

 

Put her on a 1 inch martingale so she can more quickly and easily feel tension on the leash.

 

I knew I wasn't the only person who felt this way!!

 

Harnesses are fantastic for spooky dogs, or situations where you just want your dog contained. They're not good at all for training a dog to walk "properly" on a leash. I put properly in quotes because I realize there are a lot of people who aren't terribly fussy about how/where their dog walks.

 

For me, properly means on one side of me (I am a traditionalist, so its my left), not lagging behind, not pulling (ever), and never, ever crossing in front of me unless I say "OK." When I need him at my side, I use "heel" as a command. That means his shoulder is even with my legs.

 

Any dog training book will have instructions on teaching a dog to heel. It's pretty fundamental stuff. There are lots of different ways to get started--you just have to pick one you feel seems right for you. And stick with it!


Hamish-siggy1.jpg

Susan,  Hamish,  Mister Bigglesworth and Nikita Stanislav. Missing Ming, George, and Buck

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
Guest eaglflyt

We currently have a foster, Wheat, that I think could successfully pull an 18 wheeler in *park* to the border in about 15 minutes if given the chance.

 

Here's what were doing ....

 

First, *load* your clicker with your dog. Good intro. clicker training video

, including loading or charging the clicker.

 

1) Clicker training for heel position

2) Every time he pulls ahead, I do an about face ... which makes him the one in the back again. Next time he goes in front, I turn again. Finally, he gets so tired of needing to turn, he learns that to get anywhere he needs to stay in heel position and we only go where I direct when we're walking. Of course, I give him free time in fenced areas to go wherever he likes with no leash or input from me on direction.

3) I always click and treat when he's in heel position ... up to about 20 times per minute to reinforce the correct position to start with. Then as we progress, I always reward with a click and treat when he looks up at my eyes from heel position. If he starts to pull at any point, I turn again and we're going back the direction we came from.

 

They generally learn very quickly with this method. You may have to back up to the beginning stages again as you go into areas with more distractions.

 

Here's a video that demonstrates the *turn if they get ahead* method:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sFgtqgiAKoQ

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would get a halti for walks. I have tried every thing with my greyhound Magnum, just turn 1 year old, the halti gives me control of his head and when he starts to pull it turns his head to look at me. After he pulls once on our walk he does not do it again.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest eaglflyt

I just want to offer a caution about using a Halti or Gentle Leader with a greyhound. Since they cause the head to turn if the dog gets ahead or pulls, I'd be extremely aware that a terrible neck injury could occur if the hound decided to bolt at speed after something. A sudden burst of speed would twist the head back and could cause a *severe* injury. I would suggest training as above, or a non-pull harness over a Halti or Gentle Leader. The non-pull harnesses work for some, but not all. But, they don't have the likelihood of a neck injury as exists with a head halter type device (Halti or Gentle Leader). The Sensations harness and the Wiggles, Whiskers & Wags harnesses are both very effective. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wouldn't trust the Halti to stay on their pointy little heads, especially if they get all wound up. I endorse the Wiggles, Wags and Whiskers non-pull martingale harness as well. And if you can't train your dog with the harness (note that it's the non-pull martingale harness, not a regular harness which would possibly encourage pulling), then the martingale collar. I don't personally like walking my dog with the martingale collar, I much prefer the WWW harness.

SummerGreytalkSignatureResized-1.jpg

Lisa B.

My beautiful Summer - to her forever home May 1, 2010 Summer

Certified therapy dog team with St. John Ambulance

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a thought - but it could also be seasonal. I know that when the mornings/nights are cooler, Enza's energy spikes and she is in a hurry to get to places and to see people and to smell things and omg the whole world is an awesome place to explore. She walks in front of me the whole time and walks/trots so fast I have to switch to my running shoes. It usually lasts just a few days/fortnight until she calms back down.

 

This is in stark contrast to "deathmarch - holy crap why am I not in the ac and I will drag my feet behind so everyone knows you're evil for making me go outside you awful awful Human" Enza.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Wasserbuffel

A head collar can be used safely and effectively with a grey. I would never trust it as the only collar on a dog, but only as a secondary, and NEVER with more than 2-3 feet of slack in the lead.

 

When I was training Jayne, I would loop the 6' leash that attached to her martingale through my belt loops and held the leash to the head collar so that it had slightly less slack. That way, if she began to pull, she was corrected by the head collar just before she would have pressure on her martingale.

 

Now, I just walk her normally. Leash looped over my right hand and the slack taken up in my left. I only take the head collar when we go places where she's going to get over-stimulated.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest kelli123

This is all great advice, I will tell my sister in law that just adopted 2 sisters 9month old German Shepard standard poodle mixes. they are 90lbs and are awful pullers. They are so strong its unbelievable . She will be thrilled with this information. So glad you started this topic.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know a few people that have had success with using head collars on their greys, but i knew Hector would probably hate wearing it, so used the WWW harness. I found it helped with his pulling and even while he was still in training it made him much easier to handle than when he was leaning into his collar, he improved a lot and now i've reverted back to mainly using collars. It depends on what the harness is designed for, non-pulls & sledge harnesses are opposites and therefore have different features to suit its use.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...