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Introducing Two Dogs When One Is Territorial


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Today our new upstairs neighbors moved in...and it turns out they also have a dog. Which is something we've never had to deal with in a shared yard. We were out in the fenced in backyard with her, and they came out with their dog, Cal. He's probably some sort of golden retriever mix and probably about 30 pounds lighter and several inches shorter than Molly. Well, Molly wasn't having any of it.

 

They did the sniffing thing like she always does with new dogs, and then she growled, chased him and jumped on him...teeth bared. :eek We yelled for her to stop and she did, thankfully, and we were able to slap her leash on her and get her under control nearly immediately. But the new neighbors didn't have a leash and their dog, apparently unaffected and happy as can be, kept trying to get back to Molly...tail waggin', barking, and all. My husband yelled for them to get control of their dog (the repeated "Cal come here" calls weren't working and they didn't attempt anything else...hello?!). We apologized, said we'd pop over later and yanked her from the yard as she was still baring teeth and growling at the other dog. After we left the yard, she was back to herself like nothing had happened.

 

I realized immediately it was totally our fault. Before they even entered "her" yard --- she's had it all to herself for 4 months --- we should've stopped them, asked them to meet in the front yard which is more neutral territory with both dogs leashed. We think she was just being protective of her "turf" and didn't like this other dog coming into it like he owned it (she can also be protective of her crate and bed with the cats, never people). But I now I'm worried it could be more than that. She's happy to meet other dogs on her walks. But the interactions are usually pretty short and then she's done and moved on. It's like she's got a short attention span. However, overly playful dogs that get in her face she will growl at (which I think is pretty normal, I'd tell someone in my face to back off, too). And this dog is definitely that kind of dog from what we've seen of him so far.

 

So we're planning on talking to our neighbors about some leashed meetings at first out front, and then hopefully eventually leashed meetings in the backyard (we never leave her unattended in the backyard, so I'm not worried about accidental meetings). And know that it may just be that she can't play with other dogs off leash in the yard (even though she has been to the dog park many times without incident).

 

Just wondering if there are any other tips or suggestions? Should we muzzle her (even though the other dog wouldn't be? Or is that not a good idea?)? This incident has left us a little nervous...so we just want to make sure we do everything we can to prevent it from happening again.

Edited by arandomchic

 

 

Jennifer, Mike and the menagerie ---

Molly (Blue Sky Dreamin), Tinker (BT My Lil Girl) and their feline brothers Miles and Lewis

Visit Molly's Photo Album

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I would have them meet in the road and take them for a walk together and at the end of the walk have them enter the walk together. For the next few weeks that's how I would do it. I'm a pet sitter and this is how I introduce my grey to dogs that can be a bit territorial and we've never had a problem. We do it this way until the other dog doesn't think twice about Bu coming into its yard or home.

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Guest Sunset123

Here's the introduction technique used by our dog trainer:

 

Ideally the first introduction takes place outside on neutral territory. Have both dogs on leash. Each person handling a dog should have really tasty treats on them so they can reward each dog for calm behavior. Start with the dogs about 50 feet apart. Walk the dogs in the same direction, parallel to each other. The dogs can have treats as they walk. If you run out of space, turn and go the other direction, just make sure both dogs are walking in the same directions. If either dog is pulling towards the other dog, barking or not behaving in a calm fashion, increase the distance between the two dogs until you have found the distance both dogs can walk calmly. Once you have 3 laps of both dogs walking calmly decrease the distance between the two dogs by 2-5 feet. Continue this process of increasing distance when the dogs are overly excited and decreasing the distance when you have multiple calm laps until the dogs are walking side by side.

 

Once you have the dog walking side by side, have one dog walk in front to the other. Let the dog that is behind go up for a butt sniff but keep both dogs walking. Then switch which dog is in front and which dog is in back getting to sniff.

 

At this point you can probably let the dogs sniff play and interact more normally but be careful. Make sure there is not food, bones or toys available that either dog would be likely to fight over.

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Just want to add, don't muzzle her unless the other dog is muzzled also. This puts her at a huge disadvantage, she can't protect herself.

Judy, mom to Darth Vader, Bandita, And Angel

Forever in our hearts, DeeYoGee, Dani, Emmy, Andy, Heart, Saint, Valentino, Arrow, Gee, Bebe, Jilly Bean, Bullitt, Pistol, Junior, Sammie, Joey, Gizmo, Do Bee

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Thanks...we'll talk to our neighbors and see if the are up to trying some of the suggestions above.

 

If they aren't I suppose we'll just make sure they aren't out at the same time, though that's not ideal and would make for a long year.

 

 

Jennifer, Mike and the menagerie ---

Molly (Blue Sky Dreamin), Tinker (BT My Lil Girl) and their feline brothers Miles and Lewis

Visit Molly's Photo Album

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Ditto what Judy said.

 

I would let them meet in the front yard first. and see how they do. And then go in the backyard. I know when we have a foster hound. We let him or her out in the yard by themself. And then we introduce our other hounds on leash with muzzles on one at a time to the foster hound. And they seem like they are getting along we let them off leash to play in the yard still with muzzles on though.

Sarah, mom to Stella and Winston . And to Prince, Katie Z, Malone, Brooke, Freddie, Angel and Fast who are all waiting at the Bridge!

www.gpawisconsin.org

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Guest ChasesMum

one thing I always think of with non-greyhounds is that their doggie manners are often very underdeveloped. greyhounds are raised with their litter and lots of other dogs and doggie communication. Other dogs are taken away from their litters at a very young age, and raise by humans, often without other dogs around. Their language is far more... human? than dog.

 

jmho, but I am fairly sure that's why Chase had little tolerance for adult non greys. and if they challenged her, doG help us all.

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