Jump to content

How Often Do You Deworm?


Guest limbrooke83
 Share

Recommended Posts

Guest limbrooke83

I'm taking DeeDee to the vet today to get an unusual looking spot on her tail checked out. The vet is also wanting to de-worm her, even though she was de-wormed a few months ago. She didn't show any signs of worms even after a routine fecal test the last time, but the vet says it's a good idea to de-worm them every three months since minor outbreaks of worms wouldn't necessarily show up on the test. With DeeDee being a therapy dog, the vet said it's even more important to de-worm her every three months, even though the vet recommends it for all dogs anyway.

 

My question is this: How often do you de-worm your hounds? Could it be bad for them to be de-wormed every three months, or is it fine as a precautionary measure? I didn't notice any negative side effects (diarrhea, etc) after she was de-wormed the last time, but I thought I'd post here and see what you guys think.

 

I'm a little nervous about the spot on her tail - she's a 3-yr-old white houndie who's getting her spots in anyway, but this one is big and dark, dark purple and rough, with little hair coming out of it. I'm hoping it's just a mole or something, but a vet visit will definitely set my mind at ease... hopefully! Our appointment isn't for a few more hours, so I'm hoping to get a few responses before then, even it's last minute (I just found out I was getting her into the vet today). Any help, experience, or advice would be appreciated. Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you take you pup on walks or it spends a lot of time with other dogs, then deworming might be a good idea. If she only uses the restroom in her own yard, has no indication of fleas and doesn't spend a lot of time going to dog parks and being around other dogs, I wouldn't worry about it.

Judy, mom to Darth Vader, Bandita, And Angel

Forever in our hearts, DeeYoGee, Dani, Emmy, Andy, Heart, Saint, Valentino, Arrow, Gee, Bebe, Jilly Bean, Bullitt, Pistol, Junior, Sammie, Joey, Gizmo, Do Bee

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here in the UK my vet used to say worming every six months was fine, especially since Doc is not given to scavenging, but she advised changing to every three months when he became a therapy dog since we would be visiting people who might have a compromised immune system. Keeping up to date with worming, flea and tick prevention and annual injections is a condition of registration with Pets As Therapy

 

From what I have read on here some US posters opt for a fecal test, and only deworm if that is positive, but fecal tests here come in very expensive! I use Drontal and fortunately Doc's never had a problem with it.

 

Fingers crossed for DeeDee's checkup and could the spot on her tail just be 'stud tail'? Do a search on here if you haven't come across that, despite the name the girls do get it too. Doc has it - a purplish baldish patch about a third of the way down his tail.

Clare with Tiger (Snapper Gar, b. 18/05/2015), and remembering Ken (Boomtown Ken, 01/05/2011-21/02/2020) and Doc (Barefoot Doctor, 20/08/2001-15/04/2015).

"It is also to be noted of every species, that the handsomest of each move best ... and beasts of the most elegant form, always excel in speed; of this, the horse and greyhound are beautiful examples."----Wiliam Hogarth, The Analysis of Beauty, 1753.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I totally disagree with your vet! If you have her on a monthly heartworm preventative like Heartguard Plus or Interceptor, that will take care of any minor problems if she's exposed and prevent actual infestations. Deworming should only be necessary when you have an infestation. And yes, fecals can be falsely negative but if your dog has no signs of worms, I see NO reason to deworm. If you wanted to do it prophylactically just to be safe, I would say do it once every year.

 

Honestly, I don't get what some vets are thiking and I'm just going to be totally honest in my rant here. These dewormers are chemicals! Most dogs don't have any strong immediate side effects but that doesn't mean that they don't contribute to long term health problems. I just don't get the mentality of putting chemicals into their bodies for an illness they have no indication of having.

 

I'm wondering too if the tail issue isn't stud tail. It's totally normal - a hairless patch about 1/4 - 1/3 of the way down the tail - skin color on teh tail can be very different and the skin is course. Sounds like that's all it is to me. It does not require treatment although I believe it can be an indication of a subpar diet.

gallery_12662_3351_862.jpg

Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have not heard that before (which doesn't mean much). My dogs went through a course of deworming when fresh off the track. Since then they have been on monthly interceptor and regularly given frontline for fleas and ticks. I haven't used a dewormer since they were adopted which is 5 and 4 years.

 

I tend to run conservative on any medication except pain meds so I would only talk about deworming again if I saw symptoms such as weight loss, lethargy, or saw it in their poops. We test for worms during the annual vet visit but that's it for me.

 

jinx Jen :lol

Edited by inugrey

Colleen with Covey (Admirals Cove) and Rally (greyhound puppy)
Missing my beloved boy INU (CJ Whistlindixie) my sweetest princess SALEM (CJ Little Dixie) and my baby girl ZOE (LR's Tara)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have not heard that before (which doesn't mean much). My dogs went through a course of deworming when fresh off the track. Since then they have been on monthly interceptor and regularly given frontline for fleas and ticks. I haven't used a dewormer since they were adopted which is 5 and 4 years.

 

I tend to run conservative on any medication except pain meds so I would only talk about deworming again if I saw symptoms such as weight loss, lethargy, or saw it in their poops. We test for worms during the annual vet visit but that's it for me.

 

jinx Jen :lol

:lol I was actually about to say "what she said" since you said it much more calmly. ;)

gallery_12662_3351_862.jpg

Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest limbrooke83

Thanks, everyone! I did a search on "stud tail" and it does look a lot like what DeeDee has. Hers is a bit more pronounced than what I saw in the pics, but I'm thinking it's the same thing.

 

As for de-worming - she does visit the dog park on occasion (although not so much lately due to the heat and/or mud). She hasn't shown any signs of having worms (she's actually gained weight from less frequent trips to the dog park, lol!), and she is on a monthly preventative (Heartgard). Now I'm debating whether she should even go into the vet... I guess I'll have the tail checked out just to make sure that's all it is (which I'm pretty sure now it is). I'm still debating on the de-wormer, though...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest scfilby
<br />I totally disagree with your vet!  If you have her on a monthly heartworm preventative like Heartguard Plus or Interceptor, that will take care of any minor problems if she's exposed and prevent actual infestations.  Deworming should only be necessary when you have an infestation.  And yes, fecals can be falsely negative but if your dog has no signs of worms, I see NO reason to deworm.  If you wanted to do it prophylactically just to be safe, I would say do it once every year.<br /><br />Honestly, I don't get what some vets are thiking and I'm just going to be totally honest in my rant here.  These dewormers are chemicals!  Most dogs don't have any strong immediate side effects but that doesn't mean that they don't contribute to long term health problems. I just don't get the mentality of putting chemicals into their bodies for an illness they have no indication of having.  <br /><br />I'm wondering too if the tail issue isn't stud tail.  It's totally normal - a hairless patch about 1/4 - 1/3 of the way down the tail - skin color on teh tail can be very different and the skin is course.  Sounds like that's all it is to me. It does not require treatment although I believe it can be an indication of a subpar diet.<br />
<br /><br /><br />

 

I agree with this also.. Monthly preventative and annual checks at our house..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most of mine have stud tail to some degree or another. Some have small spots and some larger ones. I keep my dogs on heart worm preventative and have never had to deworm them.

Judy, mom to Darth Vader, Bandita, And Angel

Forever in our hearts, DeeYoGee, Dani, Emmy, Andy, Heart, Saint, Valentino, Arrow, Gee, Bebe, Jilly Bean, Bullitt, Pistol, Junior, Sammie, Joey, Gizmo, Do Bee

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest limbrooke83

Sounds like I'll skip the de-worming this time, since DeeDee's on a preventative and just had a fecal exam (clean) and a de-worming a few months ago. I'll probably do a fecal exam and de-worming once a year unless symptoms crop up (her therapy dog organization requires the yearly fecal exam as well).

 

I'm feeling much better about the tail issue. I'm pretty sure it's stud tail, but will go ahead and have the vet glance at it to be sure, since I've never seen it in person before. I'm curious - is this a condition unique to greys, or do other breeds get it as well? DeeDee's my first grey, so I'm definitely still learning, lol!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Energy11

Two of my boys have stud tail.

 

I HAVE NEVER dewormed mine. They were obviously dewormed with they went into the adoption program, but never since. We give heartworm preventative yearly, which includes a parasite preventative, as well. Mine do not knowingly go where other dogs have been. We keep them on their own property, and when we travel, we aviod rest areas.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm feeling much better about the tail issue. I'm pretty sure it's stud tail, but will go ahead and have the vet glance at it to be sure, since I've never seen it in person before. I'm curious - is this a condition unique to greys, or do other breeds get it as well? DeeDee's my first grey, so I'm definitely still learning, lol!

 

I've never had another breed with it. Jilly Bean definitely doesn't have it so I'm wondering if it's just greyhounds or may just thin coated dogs.

Judy, mom to Darth Vader, Bandita, And Angel

Forever in our hearts, DeeYoGee, Dani, Emmy, Andy, Heart, Saint, Valentino, Arrow, Gee, Bebe, Jilly Bean, Bullitt, Pistol, Junior, Sammie, Joey, Gizmo, Do Bee

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest BooBooMama

I totally disagree with your vet! If you have her on a monthly heartworm preventative like Heartguard Plus or Interceptor, that will take care of any minor problems if she's exposed and prevent actual infestations. Deworming should only be necessary when you have an infestation. And yes, fecals can be falsely negative but if your dog has no signs of worms, I see NO reason to deworm. If you wanted to do it prophylactically just to be safe, I would say do it once every year.

 

Honestly, I don't get what some vets are thiking and I'm just going to be totally honest in my rant here. These dewormers are chemicals! Most dogs don't have any strong immediate side effects but that doesn't mean that they don't contribute to long term health problems. I just don't get the mentality of putting chemicals into their bodies for an illness they have no indication of having.

 

I'm wondering too if the tail issue isn't stud tail. It's totally normal - a hairless patch about 1/4 - 1/3 of the way down the tail - skin color on teh tail can be very different and the skin is course. Sounds like that's all it is to me. It does not require treatment although I believe it can be an indication of a subpar diet.

 

Very well said! I fully agree with you. That being said- the mandatory de-worming every three months might be a therapy dog requirement- more for the patients benefit than the dog's.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

<br />I totally disagree with your vet! If you have her on a monthly heartworm preventative like Heartguard Plus or Interceptor, that will take care of any minor problems if she's exposed and prevent actual infestations. Deworming should only be necessary when you have an infestation. And yes, fecals can be falsely negative but if your dog has no signs of worms, I see NO reason to deworm. If you wanted to do it prophylactically just to be safe, I would say do it once every year.<br /><br />Honestly, I don't get what some vets are thiking and I'm just going to be totally honest in my rant here. These dewormers are chemicals! Most dogs don't have any strong immediate side effects but that doesn't mean that they don't contribute to long term health problems. I just don't get the mentality of putting chemicals into their bodies for an illness they have no indication of having. <br /><br />I'm wondering too if the tail issue isn't stud tail. It's totally normal - a hairless patch about 1/4 - 1/3 of the way down the tail - skin color on teh tail can be very different and the skin is course. Sounds like that's all it is to me. It does not require treatment although I believe it can be an indication of a subpar diet.<br />
<br /><br /><br />

 

I agree with this also.. Monthly preventative and annual checks at our house..

 

Took the words right out of my mouth! Totally agree.

Edited by racindog
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest TBSFlame

I worm about every 3 months b/c I have visiting hounds in and out. I take them to place where other dogs have been. They also sleep with me and I want to make sure they don't have worms. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest kydie

Long before interceptor, when heartworm meds where not give,,,, as they do protect from worms,,,, I didn't worm a dog , after intitional worming,,, EVER,,, :blink: unless there was an issue,,,, they were never around any other dogs,,, but each other,, even the "hunters" had no problems :unsure and were checked annual at vets,,,, and never had worms,,, but then again,,, I live in the tundra of Pa :lol

Edited by kydie
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest TeddysMom

Ivermectin monthly for heartworm prevention and every 2 months with Strongid or Drontal. I live in the country with lots of wildlife passing through the yard and the dog yard was a cow pasture.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest limbrooke83

We're back from the vet's office. Vet said the tail didn't look like anything to worry about. I'm not sure she'd ever heard of "stud tail" before, but she mentioned there's a gland in that general area that can cause weird things to happen, but nothing looked concerning to her, so that's good. Sounds like I've got a female stud on my hands. ;)

 

I decided against the de-worming this time. I'll do some more thinking, since she does occasionally visit the dog park. I may opt for every six months unless symptoms arise.

 

Thanks again to everyone who shared input and experiences. You guys are awesome! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interceptor takes care of rounds hooks and whips but not tapes. Heartgard takes care of rounds and hooks but not whips or tapes. Seeing little "grains of rice" on my yorkie years ago put tapeworms on the list of things that skeeve me out...and we lived in an apartment in Uptown urban Dallas.

 

A very GH savvy vet told me a Heartgard was overrated, overhyped and overpriced -- I'd be better giving straight Ivermectin (which doesn't have to be liquid cattle wormer -- you can buy the pills) and the worming every few months with a broad spectrum wormer like Drontrol. My guys go for walks almost every day just to get them out and about and let them enjoy new experiences so we do deworm every few months.

gallery_8149_3261_283.jpg
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great question. I have my two over 6 years now and they have only been de-wormed once, when they came off the track. Since then all yearly stool tests have been negative. My vet has never suggested routine de-worming. They are on Interceptor, and as others have posted, I would be reluctant to routinely de-worm unless there was a real reason to do so. I, too, don't like giving them any chemicals unless really necessary.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Two of my boys have stud tail.

 

I HAVE NEVER dewormed mine. They were obviously dewormed with they went into the adoption program, but never since. We give heartworm preventative yearly, which includes a parasite preventative, as well. Mine do not knowingly go where other dogs have been. We keep them on their own property, and when we travel, we aviod rest areas.

 

Neither have I--in 49 years of my life and numerous dogs, I have NEVER had a vet suggest "routine deworming."

 

George was dewormed twice when I first adopted him, and he's been on Heartgard Plus since then. My vets don't ever suggest it unless they find parasites in his stool.

 

Same goes for my cats.


Hamish-siggy1.jpg

Susan,  Hamish,  Mister Bigglesworth and Nikita Stanislav. Missing Ming, George, and Buck

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...