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How Do You Know When Your Dog Needs A Dental?


Guest Fluffy
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Guest Fluffy

So, a newbie question.

 

I know from reading GT that greys have congenitally terrible teeth and will usually need dentals, where their teeth are cleaned below the gumline, and sometimes teeth are extracted. And when I took Badger to the vet after I got him, for his well-dog visits, the vet mentioned doing dentals. But when I pressed her on how often, all she could say was that it varies from dog to dog. She couldn't give me any guidelines for how often I should estimate them to be needed, or how I would know he needed one, which has been eating at me because I am a budget-type person, and given how expensive I hear dentals are, I'd really like to know how much I should expect to pay out for them per month/year/decade/whatever.

 

So, GTers, come to my rescue and answer these two questions:

 

1. How do you know your grey is in need of a real, vet-performed dental?

2. How often does your grey tend to need such a dental?

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It really does depend dog to dog. I have four greys - one needs a dental every 8-10 months (which we stretch to once a year), one needs one about every two years, and two haven't needed one since they've been with us (2 years and 3 years). They all get the same to eat, the same treats, the same water, the same everything. I don't do any teeth brushing - I know, bad Momma! - though they do get a chew bone every night. I'm also considering raw turkey necks during the summer when they can eat them outside.

 

Some things to look for:

>really bad breath - beyond the basic dog-breath version

>trouble or reluctance to eat normal food (crunchy kibble)

>trouble or reluctance to chew chewing things - rawhides, bones, whatever

>bleeding around the gumline

>lots of tartar build up on the non-chewing surfaces

>blood on toys or chews

 

In my neck of the woods (Portland Oregon) a dental with full anesthesia runs me about $250-$300. I ususally ask them to do toenail clipping at the same time so that's extra. There are places where you can have their teeth scaled while they're awake. It takes a specially trained tech for this though and it's not common around here. There is a shot you can get - it's had mixed results. And lots of dental sprays, water additives, and other things to help stretch the time in between full dental work.

 

Greyhounds do tend to lose teeth and they can really get along fine without them. There are quite a few greys on the board with very few teeth.

Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

35764734494_93de5b5963_b.jpg

Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

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I figure about once a year. Some signs include visible tarter, bad breath,any bleeding, and/or trouble eating.

Beth, Petey (8 September 2018- ), and Faith (22 March 2019). Godspeed Patrick (28 April 1999 - 5 August 2012), Murphy (23 June 2004 - 27 July 2013), Leo (1 May 2009 - 27 January 2020), and Henry (10 August 2010 - 7 August 2020), you were loved more than you can know.

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Guest 4dogscrazy

I'd start putting money away now, then you will at least have a start. I understand the need for budgeting, and that's what I would do. There are some greys who never need their teeth cleaned, or sometimes not until they are seniors. Some need to be done once a year, like the above poster said. It's important to remember that rarely does a dog need his teeth cleaned in an emergency, unless he/she gets an abcess. If it makes you feel better, put some money away in a "vet" fund, that way if you have an emergency, or decide to do a dental, the money will be there. If you never use it and it starts to build up? Buy him one of those expensive beds that looks like a couch! :lol

 

ETA: I've had Tempe and Piper for two years, and no dental needed in sight yet. They both had dentals when I adopted them though!

Edited by 4dogscrazy
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Guest kydie

When my grey came 2 weeks later he needed a dental, REALLY bad breath, and YUCKY looking teeth, that was almost 2 years ago, cost here in nowhereville $147.00, now I made it my mission to have as few as possible in his life, so we brush, give lots of chews, lots of GT'er have greyt ideas and products they use and can tell you about how they work for them, I know some hounds just have worse teeth than others, but for me the money was not the issue, but putting him under anthesia is Good Luck :)

Edited by kydie
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To answer your question... when the vet tells us a dental is needed.

 

We've had Celeste for over 4 years - still no need for a dental. Bonny and Darcy had their first dental earlier this year - first one in 2-3 years for them. Our vet really looks at each dog individually during their annual exams. She doesn't push procedures unless necessary.

Laura with Celeste (ICU Celeste) and Galgos Beatrix and Encarna
The Horse - Gracie (MD Grace E)
Bridge Angels Faye Oops (Santa Fe Oops), Bonny (
Bonny Drive), Darcy (D's Zipperfoot)

 

 

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Guest DoofBert

I had Tessa's dental last week. I began using a product called Petzlife - Life for Teeth on her for the past month.....and beleave it not, the tartar began to literally flake off. '

 

While I agreet hat dentals are required if the tartar/bad breaqth etc are really bad, I truly believe there is something to be said for using this product (either spray or gel).....my vet and his techs said the dental went much faster and was easier as the tartar was somewhat softened.

 

Tessa got dentals every two years. Now that she is 10+, our vet stated she probably won't be put under anesthesia for future dentals, so we'll need to stay on top of things.

 

Good luck.

 

 

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I had Tessa's dental last week. I began using a product called Petzlife - Life for Teeth on her for the past month.....and beleave it not, the tartar began to literally flake off. '

 

Where do you buy this? How is it applied? Do you use it everyday?

Beth, Petey (8 September 2018- ), and Faith (22 March 2019). Godspeed Patrick (28 April 1999 - 5 August 2012), Murphy (23 June 2004 - 27 July 2013), Leo (1 May 2009 - 27 January 2020), and Henry (10 August 2010 - 7 August 2020), you were loved more than you can know.

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Guest Fluffy

It's important to remember that rarely does a dog need his teeth cleaned in an emergency, unless he/she gets an abcess.

 

This assuages a large chunk of my worry. I think I had visions of taking him in for a yearly checkup and the vet going "My god, he needed a dental six months ago! Look at all this plaque! Why didn't you KNOW and bring him in??" If I can expect her to be able to take a look at his yearly checkup and just be like, "Yeah, maybe we should line one up" or "He's good for now unless he starts feeling pain or something", that's most of what I need to know. I guess I was assuming it was a more time-sensitive thing than it really is, and I was wondering how I was supposed to know when he needed it without having to go to the vet every month or something to make sure he didn't.

 

Yay, one less thing to panic about!

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Guest Che_mar_Cody

I'm with winnie on this issue. I've had Cody almost 6 years and no dental and he'll be 11. Vet told me whatever I'm doing to keep doing it, his teeth are amazing.

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Guest IGmom4now

If you keep in touch with his teeth, brushing, etc., you'll know. They start to look gross, and you can tell the dog is not happy in the mouth. I've had IGs who got brushed every day and still had dentals and extractions every year. My grey, whose teeth were nasty when I first met him, gets a brushing at bed time, a marrow bone about once a week, and really doesn't need one at three years out. Just pay attention to your dog, and you'll know. :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

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I don't brush the boys' teeth, but I do scale any tartar buildup with a dental instrument I bought - same kind as the dentists use. The bone they eat takes care of most of it but I do the remainder when they're chilling in the family room.

Doe's Bruciebaby Doe's Bumper

Derek

Follow my Ironman journeys and life with dogs, cats and busy kids: A long road

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