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Vibration/tone E-Collar Training


Guest echen
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Guest echen

Before you guys get out the pitchforks and stakes...

 

I'm really trying to ask a sensible question. It just seems to me that a greyhound that is properly introduced to a remote collar can benefit from it. Considering they move so quickly and aren't the most recall savvy dogs, having a remote collar just might save their lives. Don't get me wrong, I'm not going to even go into the off-leash debate--but in case your leash slips off or the dog slips out the door, wouldn't it be good to have a back-up tool in your arsenal to keep your pooch safe? I was told that greyhounds running full speed will have trouble hearing your commands due to heart and wind noise alone. A remote attention-getter would be so useful to get the attention of a hound giving chase too...

 

Has anyone ever tried the e-collars using only vibration/tone? I'm not a fan of shocking any dog, so I wouldn't use electric stimulation anyway, but the vibration mode seems pretty harmless. There's no electric conduction, it's purely vibration/tone. Of course the dog will need to be introduced to the collar carefully and it's probably not for the skittish/easily-spooked greyhound.

 

In no way am I "planning" to do this...but it seems like anything dealing with remote collar training is taboo here.

 

Any thoughts would be appreciated!

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Guest gecko_foot

Before you guys get out the pitchforks and stakes...

 

I'm really trying to ask a sensible question. It just seems to me that a greyhound that is properly introduced to a remote collar can benefit from it. Considering they move so quickly and aren't the most recall savvy dogs, having a remote collar just might save their lives. Don't get me wrong, I'm not going to even go into the off-leash debate--but in case your leash slips off or the dog slips out the door, wouldn't it be good to have a back-up tool in your arsenal to keep your pooch safe? I was told that greyhounds running full speed will have trouble hearing your commands due to heart and wind noise alone. A remote attention-getter would be so useful to get the attention of a hound giving chase too...

 

Has anyone ever tried the e-collars using only vibration/tone? I'm not a fan of shocking any dog, so I wouldn't use electric stimulation anyway, but the vibration mode seems pretty harmless. There's no electric conduction, it's purely vibration/tone. Of course the dog will need to be introduced to the collar carefully and it's probably not for the skittish/easily-spooked greyhound.

 

In no way am I "planning" to do this...but it seems like anything dealing with remote collar training is taboo here.

 

Any thoughts would be appreciated!

 

My philosophy is to be only as firm as I need to be to get the point across, so I definitely support the proper use of humane training tools - including e-collars. The only reservation I would have about using this tool on a greyhound is the potential for the dog to overreact and injure itself. The greyhound might stop when it receives the stimulus, or it might run faster in the wrong direction to "get away" from it.

 

Here's just an example:

 

While I was still adjusting to having a greyhound, Tumnus bumped into my ethernet cord with his back feet and flipped out. He did a 180 and bolted like he'd been shot, ripping the ethernet cord out of my computer. He wasn't injured - just shaken. The whole issue was my fault, and I have since purchased a wireless router to eliminate the problem. Still, I was very surprised at how reactive Tumnus was with the cord. He's normally very confident and calm in almost every other situation.

 

I can definitely see the benefits of using an e-collar, but I would consult a behaviorist and/or trainer beforehand. You also need to think about your dog's personality. If you have a skittish grey, the e-collar might make the problem worse. Greyhounds in general aren't known for being the most obedient dogs in the world, and I think most owners generally accept that their dogs aren't going to sit, stay, and lay down every single time they ask. More often than not, the greyhound will be oogling at something outside...or sleeping...instead of watching your every move.

 

I hope this is helpful, and if I sound patronizing in this post, I apologize. None of it was meant to sound that way.

 

Good luck!

Edited by gecko_foot
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I do recall training with both dogs, both dogs are micro-chipped and wear tag collars 24-7-365. As a back up for my spooky girl, I use a DogTracs GPS device attached to her harness when walking or going anywhere outside of the yard, including trips in the car...to the store or to another state. I've tested it and it's amazing, I wish I'd had one for my half-grey, Kobie, when he ran away. He would be sitting by my side right now. I would never ever use an E collar on any dog - for any reason.

Edited by ckruzan

Sunsands Doodles: Doodles aka Claire, Bella Run Softly: Softy aka Bowie (the Diamond Dog)

Missing my beautiful boy Sunsands Carl 2.25.2003 - 4.1.2014

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Tavarish has a shock collar that I use the tone for as recall if he decides he's done listening to me or I can't whistle or yell loud enough to get to him.

 

I pulled his collar back out last night as he's decided he doesn't have to listen to me anymore - he comes still, but on his own time and not stop dead in his tracks and come back to me like he used to. His collar is a reminder - just having it on and then the tone is the backup. I used it today when he didn't come back when I called as quickly as he should have.

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Guest LindsaySF

I do recall training with both dogs, both dogs are micro-chipped and wear tag collars 24-7-365.

This. :nod

 

 

 

 

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If the dog is "in the zone" after prey (or digging a hole, or eating dirt, or .... :lol), he likely won't even notice vibration/tone. If he's just bumbling around, I guess the tone would remind him you're there, but unlike Trudy's Tavarish (dobe), most greyhounds just don't care that much about you.

Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
We miss Reko Batman (Trouper Zeke x Marque Louisiana), 11/15/95-6/29/06, Rocco the thistledown whippet, 04/29/93-10/14/08, Reko Zema (Mo Kick x Reko Princess), 8/16/98-4/18/10, the most beautiful girl in the whole USA, my good egg Joseph aka Won by a Nose (Oneco Cufflink x Buy Back), 09/22/2003-03/01/2013, and our gentle sweet Gidget (Digitizer, Dodgem by Design x Sobe Mulberry), 1/29/2006-11/22/2014, gone much too soon. Never forgetting CJC's Buckshot, 1/2/07-10/25/10.

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Guest TeddysMom

I have have really good success with these collars for boxers, in fact I have 2 deaf boxers that are trained to look at me when they feel the vibration then follow hand signals. I don't really need them for the greys since they are either in a secure fenced yard or on a leash, I don't think I would ever trust them to be off lead, just too much inbred instinct to run and chase pray.

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If the dog is "in the zone" after prey (or digging a hole, or eating dirt, or .... :lol), he likely won't even notice vibration/tone. If he's just bumbling around, I guess the tone would remind him you're there, but unlike Trudy's Tavarish (dobe), most greyhounds just don't care that much about you.

 

Batmom! You say the BEST stuff!!!

 

I've tried to present this opiniom (above) before and never know how to say it.

 

As far as MY hound goes; the scenario the OP presents would require the dog to wear the e-collar 24/7. The way MINE reacts when something scares him is on the "flight" side of "fight or flight." I can picture it now; the stimulation goes off, the dog reacts, by running FASTER away from you.

 

I'm NOT against the principal; hunting dog trainers use them all the time, and in fact I just disposed of my father's (he never used it--bought it 10 years ago but didn't have the heart--I told my mother I'd sell it for her but I just threw it away!), but I don't think it would work on a greyhound.

 

To me they're more like cats than dogs when it comes to recall--their first thought isn't pleasing their human, it's "what's in it for ME?"


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Susan,  Hamish,  Mister Bigglesworth and Nikita Stanislav. Missing Ming, George, and Buck

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Ditto to what Batmom said. As another poster said they can be useful for getting the attention of deaf dogs, but otherwise I can't see a point to them.

 

For a 'remote attention-getter', I would suggest training your dog to respond to a whistle, which carries better than the human voice. Or you could carry one of those devices ('lure callers'?) which are used by hunters to imitate bird or game calls, I have seen these referred to by US Greytalkers but I just keep a spare dog toy squeaker in my handbag. That is always a sure-fire way of attracting Doc's attention!

Clare with Tiger (Snapper Gar, b. 18/05/2015), and remembering Ken (Boomtown Ken, 01/05/2011-21/02/2020) and Doc (Barefoot Doctor, 20/08/2001-15/04/2015).

"It is also to be noted of every species, that the handsomest of each move best ... and beasts of the most elegant form, always excel in speed; of this, the horse and greyhound are beautiful examples."----Wiliam Hogarth, The Analysis of Beauty, 1753.

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First, if you purchase one that can also shock do not use it as a shock collar even once & be careful to disable the metal prongs so a shock cannot happen accidentally. Now, if you are referring to using a tone/vibration only collar or one that has had the shock portion disabled, then yes I have considered it for my senior who is getting deafer with each passing month. The idea would be as another poster mentioned, to teach the dog to turn to look for me when he feels the vibration though in our case I want him to do a recall not just turn.

 

For a dog with good hearing it is possible it would help with recall if a Grey was say up wind from you & your voice would not carry to them though few of us have safe off-leash areas that are large enough for that. Or if you have a dog that is more sensitive to touch rather than sound. My Staghound is like that.

 

Am looking at my younger Grey girl & thinking of how she would run herself into the ground on a lure coursing field even with an injury & must conclude that a tone or vibration is unlikely to deter her from her prey if she were in chase mode no matter how heavily reinforced a recall on tone or vibration was. I would never use a shock collar on my dogs and in the case of my girl, she is definitely one of the ones likely to take off at a blind run out of fear & not pay heed to any dangers in her path.

 

For the cost of the experiment, I think the suggestions for whistle training are the best. Also, the predator calls are very helpful as another poster suggested. If you try this, let us know how it turns out.

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