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The Life Of Our Hounds


tra708
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i wanted to share some thoughts i had about how to deal with the inevitable time when our hounds leave us. I like to think of these wonderful dogs as creatures of God (whatever your concept of God might be), and that we are just sort of "borrowing" them for a while. In the time between retirement and death, they need somewhere to live and someone to love them and take care of them and basically spoil them rotten. It might be one year, it might be 10 years. However long that is, it's my job to keep them happy and comfy. Then, when that time is finished for them, they return to the universe. Of course we will miss them, but they were never "ours" to begin with. Then, we start the job again with another one who needs us.

I don't know; this might seem like rubbish when it really happens, but abby's death last year left me so distraught, that when i adopted another, i tried to also adopt some new thoughts to cope with the inevitable. I hope it helps someone going through this painful time. :angelwings

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Guest jenznaz

That's very nice. I know there is a quote of a similar nature from an author, I'll have to try and find it...thanks!

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I happened across a very soulful (and dog focused) blogger yesterday. Her dog is still with her but she's thinking about how she'll feel when he's not and what kinds of things she'll remember. Finally she realized that what she'll remember most is not how he looked or what he did but rather the way she feels about him. That feeling will be her strongest memory and won't be going anywhere!

Mary with Jumper Jack (2/17/11) and angels Shane (PA's Busta Rime, 12/10/02 - 10/14/16) and Spencer (Dutch Laser, 11/25/00 - 3/29/13).

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Guest AmandaTolleson

Thank you very much... I am having a lot of trouble thinking of how long I have with my new girl. Millie is just so bright I can't imagine her gone and I haven't even had her 3 weeks.

And even MORE difficult for me to imagine. My Canaan Dog Josiah is my heart dog. He will be 6 in 4 days and I have had him since he was 5 wks old and I have never been without him for longer then a day. Ever. I really truly can't imagine it and I am kind of freaking out... :(

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Your words reminded me of this lovely poem, which seems to be a variation of a poem by Edgar Guest:

 

I'll lend you for a little while

A dog of mine, God said

For you to love while he's alive

And mourn for when he's dead.

So will you, till I call him back

Take care of him for me?

He'll bring his love to gladden you

And should his stay be brief

You shall have his memories

As solace for your grief.

I cannot promise he will stay

Since all from Earth return

But there are lessons taught down there

I want this dog to learn.

I've looked this wide world over

In my search for teachers true

And from the throngs that crowd life's lanes

I have selected you.

Now, will you give him all your love

Nor think the labours vain?

Nor hate me when I come to call

To take him back again?

I fancied that I heard you say

Dear Lord, Thy will be done

For all the joy this dog shall bring

The risk of grief I'll run.

Will you shelter him with tenderness

And love him while you may?

And for the happiness you've known

Forever grateful stay?

But should the angels call for him

Much sooner than you planned

Brave the bitter grief that comes

And try to understand.

 

Author unknown

SunnySophiePegsdon.jpg

When a relationship of love is disrupted, the relationship does not cease. The love continues; therefore, the relationship continues. The work of grief is to reconcile and redeem life to a different love relationship. ~ W Scott Lineberry

Always Greyhounds Home Boarding and Greyhounds With Love House Sitting

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Guest PhillyPups

Very helpful in trying to come to grips with the losses.

 

With every angel that has left me, my world is rocked, my heart shredded and I want to join them. I feel that I can never go through the pain again. Just as I resolve - never again, I can't go through this - one in need shows up. They are never replacing, as my angels can never be replaced. The new one is just moving into my heart, becoming a member of my family and sharing the sofa.

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I should not have read that poem at work here. :cry1 :cry1 :cry1 how very beautiful.

 

and Tra708 -- I think it's a wonderful way to feel about our beloved babies. Thank you. :)

Kim and Bruce - with Rick (Rick Roufus 6/30/16) and missing my sweet greyhound Angels Rainey (LG's Rainey 10/4/2000 - 3/8/2011), Anubis (RJ's Saint Nick 12/25/2001 - 9/12/12) and Zeke (Hey Who Whiz It 4/6/2009 - 7/20/2020) and Larry (PTL Laroach 2/24/2007 - 8/2/2020) -- and Chester (Lab) (8/31/1990 - 5/3/2005), Captain (Schipperke) (10/12/1992 - 6/13/2005) and Remy (GSP) (?/?/1998 - 1/6/2005) at the bridge
"Always do sober what you said you'd do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut." -- Ernest Hemmingway

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Guest BooBooMama

My Favorite:

 

 

Why Dogs Don't Live As Long As People

======================================

 

Being a veterinarian, I had been called to examine a ten-year-old

Irish Wolfhound named Belker. The dog's owners, Ron, his wife Lisa, and

their little boy, Shane, were all very much attached to Belker and they

were hoping for a miracle.

 

I examined Belker and found he was dying of cancer. I told the family

there were no miracles left for Belker, and offered to perform the

euthanasia procedure for the old dog in their home. As we made

arrangements, Ron and Lisa told me they thought it would be good the four-year-old Shane to observe the procedure. They

felt as though Shane might learn something from the experience.

 

The next day, I felt the familiar catch in my throat as Belker's

family surrounded him. Shane seemed so calm, petting the old dog for the

last time, that I wondered if he understood what was going on.

 

Within a few minutes, Belker slipped peacefully away. The little boy

seemed to accept Belker's transition without any difficulty or confusion.

 

We sat together for a while after Belker's death, wondering aloud

about the sad fact that animal lives are shorter than human lives.

 

Shane, who had been listening quietly, piped up, "I know why."

 

Startled, we all turned to him. What came out of his mouth next

stunned me. I'd never heard a more comforting explanation. He said,

"People are born so that they can learn how to live a good life like loving

everybody all the time and being nice, right?"

 

The four-year-old continued, "Well, dogs already know how to do that,

so they don't have to stay as long."

 

Live simply. Love generously. Care deeply. Speak kindly.

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Guest TahoeMom

After Tahoe passed away my daughter said, "Mom, if they lived any longer than they do, it would be all that much harder for us to move on." I don't know why, but at the time those words were exactly what I needed to hear.

 

 

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Guest ss556

It is a nice way of looking at it. I always wondered how long I would have Alan and that thought haunted me. I know he was happy during that period of retirement and death. I think that belief may have helped me a bit because his passing destroyed me for a while. I hope that one day I will adopt again and I will keep this in mind.

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Guest Energy11

i wanted to share some thoughts i had about how to deal with the inevitable time when our hounds leave us. I like to think of these wonderful dogs as creatures of God (whatever your concept of God might be), and that we are just sort of "borrowing" them for a while. In the time between retirement and death, they need somewhere to live and someone to love them and take care of them and basically spoil them rotten. It might be one year, it might be 10 years. However long that is, it's my job to keep them happy and comfy. Then, when that time is finished for them, they return to the universe. Of course we will miss them, but they were never "ours" to begin with. Then, we start the job again with another one who needs us.

I don't know; this might seem like rubbish when it really happens, but abby's death last year left me so distraught, that when i adopted another, i tried to also adopt some new thoughts to cope with the inevitable. I hope it helps someone going through this painful time. angelwings.gif

 

Wonderful words of wisdom, ... full of depth, and I live by them EVERYDAY! Thank you!

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It is a nice way of looking at it. I always wondered how long I would have Alan and that thought haunted me. I know he was happy during that period of retirement and death. I think that belief may have helped me a bit because his passing destroyed me for a while. I hope that one day I will adopt again and I will keep this in mind.

i know. abby's passing away destroyed me too. i have often seen your posts about Alan, and thought...that must have been your once-in-a-lifetime dog, like abby was. my two new ones are not like her, but they are beautiful souls who need someone to take care of them. and that's what keeps me going. when the one year anniversary of abby's passing happened a week ago, i was finally able to look at some other posts in the remembrance section, and put my two cents in. i guess we should just consider ourselves lucky to have loved these dogs. :grouphug

 

My Favorite:

 

 

Why Dogs Don't Live As Long As People

======================================

 

Being a veterinarian, I had been called to examine a ten-year-old

Irish Wolfhound named Belker. The dog's owners, Ron, his wife Lisa, and

their little boy, Shane, were all very much attached to Belker and they

were hoping for a miracle.

 

I examined Belker and found he was dying of cancer. I told the family

there were no miracles left for Belker, and offered to perform the

euthanasia procedure for the old dog in their home. As we made

arrangements, Ron and Lisa told me they thought it would be good the four-year-old Shane to observe the procedure. They

felt as though Shane might learn something from the experience.

 

The next day, I felt the familiar catch in my throat as Belker's

family surrounded him. Shane seemed so calm, petting the old dog for the

last time, that I wondered if he understood what was going on.

 

Within a few minutes, Belker slipped peacefully away. The little boy

seemed to accept Belker's transition without any difficulty or confusion.

 

We sat together for a while after Belker's death, wondering aloud

about the sad fact that animal lives are shorter than human lives.

 

Shane, who had been listening quietly, piped up, "I know why."

 

Startled, we all turned to him. What came out of his mouth next

stunned me. I'd never heard a more comforting explanation. He said,

"People are born so that they can learn how to live a good life like loving

everybody all the time and being nice, right?"

 

The four-year-old continued, "Well, dogs already know how to do that,

so they don't have to stay as long."

 

Live simply. Love generously. Care deeply. Speak kindly.

 

thank you for sharing that. t.

 

Your words reminded me of this lovely poem, which seems to be a variation of a poem by Edgar Guest:

 

I'll lend you for a little while

A dog of mine, God said

For you to love while he's alive

And mourn for when he's dead.

So will you, till I call him back

Take care of him for me?

He'll bring his love to gladden you

And should his stay be brief

You shall have his memories

As solace for your grief.

I cannot promise he will stay

Since all from Earth return

But there are lessons taught down there

I want this dog to learn.

I've looked this wide world over

In my search for teachers true

And from the throngs that crowd life's lanes

I have selected you.

Now, will you give him all your love

Nor think the labours vain?

Nor hate me when I come to call

To take him back again?

I fancied that I heard you say

Dear Lord, Thy will be done

For all the joy this dog shall bring

The risk of grief I'll run.

Will you shelter him with tenderness

And love him while you may?

And for the happiness you've known

Forever grateful stay?

But should the angels call for him

Much sooner than you planned

Brave the bitter grief that comes

And try to understand.

 

Author unknown

 

yeah. i think that's what i was trying to say. thanks. :)

2rqyqhd.jpg

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Guest Mom2Shiloh

The poem is beautiful, as is the story of the little boy (which I have heard a version of before, but I rather prefer this version).

 

I try to hold onto the concept of "death" being merely a doorway and, on the other side, in God's presence (however you perceive God) life continues but without the pain, and illness we have here. I admit, I have my shaky moments -- I've lost so many family members, both human and canine, in the last few years that I sometimes feel like life is a river with a strong current that is flowing too fast and carrying all that I've known and love away --- but just as I'm feeling sad and inclined to panic --- I am aware of the lessons of great and all encompassing love that have come into my life on a daily basis as I share my days with my Greyhounds and other dogs, and am inspired by the friends I have who are also blessed to have these angels as friends and teachers.

 

All of you, and the way that you love and are loved, are like a magnificent garden in my life -- friends I know through Greyhound adoption, some in person, some only on line bring me back to a realization of how hugely blessed I am -- and I'm somehow able to come back to being in the moment and celebrate the beautiful beings who are sharing my life right now.

 

Greyhounds and their people are the very best folks there are :) Thanks guys :blush

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Guest Gingergrey

Truer words were never spoken. I also think of them as creatures of God, angelic beings of sorts. They are so good that God wants them eventually. I'll never understand why their life spans are so short. I understand about being distraught, its a natural feeling to have. :bighug to you.

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Guest Gingergrey

Truer words were never spoken. I also think of them as creatures of God, angelic beings of sorts. They are so good that God wants them eventually. I'll never understand why their life spans are so short. I understand about being distraught, its a natural feeling to have. :bighug to you.

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