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Myotherapy Anyone?


Guest freightsmom
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Guest freightsmom

Hi All,

 

I'm looking for experiences with canine myotherapy...anyone ever used it with their greyhounds?

 

I've checked it out on the internet but would like first hand stories if you have them.

 

Thanks!

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Guest smarthound

Hi,

 

Maybe I can answer your questions. I am a trained canine myotherapist. Is there something in particular that you would like to know?

Edited by smarthound
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Guest freightsmom

Hi and thanks for responding....I'm trying to understand what is the difference between myotherapy and some of the acupressure or chiropractic methods? I ran into someone locally who is also a trained myotherapist and am curious to know more.

 

Thanks!

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"Myo" = muscle.

"therapy" = therapy.

 

It is massage therapy. The terminology depends on with whom you trained. Jack Meagher said "A muscle is a muscle, no matter how it's packaged." He started the equine massage ("myotherapy") movement decades ago, Lord rest his soul.

 

I've used it on horses, and my dogs sometimes get it (the carpenter's kids never have shoes) lol.gif

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Guest smarthound

Myotherapy literally means muscle therapy. The technique specifically addresses triggerpoints, i.e. the hard, little lumps you might find in your muscles. I personally have triggerpoints in my neck muscles and they can be very tender.

 

Here is a detailed description of myotherapy and how it works:

 

Trigger Point Myotherapy involves a non-invasive, hands-on method of locating pressure points in the muscles through palpation. It then includes the relief of these pressure point(s) through specific compression techniques and the re-education of muscle tissue through the use of passive stretching routines.

 

Trigger points are defined as hypersensitive locations in the muscles. They are tight and tender congested muscle spots filled with toxins and waste that can cause the muscle to spasm, limit the movement of joints and can cause increased nerve sensitivity ranging from sharp pain to a dull ache.

 

Trigger points can be caused by a number of issues including overuse of a muscle, stress, trauma or accident or not stretching or improper stretching before exercise.

 

Benefits of TPM include relaxation, release of endorphins for natural pain relief, increase range of motion and improve flexibility, decrease stiffness and spasms. TPM can reduce muscle strain and tension, increase the flow of blood and nutrients to promote healing and improve nervous system function.

 

Conditions that respond favorably to this technique including lameness, roaching, hip dysplasia and arthritis, spinal misalignment and many post-operative circumstances.

 

Normal treatment time is about 45-60 minutes long.

 

 

Let me know if you have any questions.

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