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Guest wingo002
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Guest wingo002

Hi - I'm new to this forum, and need help with my retired greyhound, Bee. She's 4 years old, i've had her for 11 months, and i got her two weeks off the track.

 

Over the last month, Bee began to shred things like pillows, plastic bags, and sheets. Two weeks ago she started urinating in the house, and the biggest problem is that she bites. She's bitten me three times - the third time was last night. She was laying on the sofa and I leaned over to try and move her over and she bit me on the cheek. The other two times were very similar. I made sure she was awake every time, and i've often moved her in this manner and she's not tried to bite me.

 

During the first 8 months she was kenneled when i wasn't at home, eventually she was allowed to roam the house. As of this week, she's back in the kennel when I'm not at home, but she doesn't like her kennel any more. She used to go into it all the time, now she runs when i try to put her in it.

 

How do i stop her from biting? Is it normal for her to change her opinion of her crate?

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Guest gecko_foot

Hi - I'm new to this forum, and need help with my retired greyhound, Bee. She's 4 years old, i've had her for 11 months, and i got her two weeks off the track.

 

Over the last month, Bee began to shred things like pillows, plastic bags, and sheets. Two weeks ago she started urinating in the house, and the biggest problem is that she bites. She's bitten me three times - the third time was last night. She was laying on the sofa and I leaned over to try and move her over and she bit me on the cheek. The other two times were very similar. I made sure she was awake every time, and i've often moved her in this manner and she's not tried to bite me.

 

During the first 8 months she was kenneled when i wasn't at home, eventually she was allowed to roam the house. As of this week, she's back in the kennel when I'm not at home, but she doesn't like her kennel any more. She used to go into it all the time, now she runs when i try to put her in it.

 

How do i stop her from biting? Is it normal for her to change her opinion of her crate?

 

I'm still fairly new at this, and my greyhound hasn't had biting issues (I hope he never will), but I'll give it my best shot. Some of the more experienced grey owners can probably give you better advice about this situation. I like lists...so...here goes!

 

1. Can you describe the circumstances surrounding the bites in more detail - i.e. Did she growl, give you the warning stare (direct, focused stare with NO sound), cringing, or any other warning/fear signs?

 

2. Can you describe the bite itself - i.e. Did she draw blood, hang on to you, or just nip?

 

3. I wouldn't lean over any dog - especially if he/she is prone to biting. Leaning over any animal, at least in my experience, makes them feel cornered and can trigger a defensive response even in a dog that is conditioned to being in that position. I can lean over Tumnus, BUT I have spent months making sure that he is comfortable (practically goes to sleep) with every aspect of handling - feet, muzzle, belly, back, tail, etc. - and I reinforce this trust on a daily basis. Wonder boy will do anything for peanut butter and a hot dog. :lol

 

4. Can you describe how you interact with the dog when she misbehaves and in general? Are you a naturally stressed or type A personality? I'm not saying that you mistreat her at all. I just know that Tumnus tends to misbehave more when I am stressed and/or impatient.

 

5. Tumnus doesn't really like his crate, but he knows that he's going in it regardless of what he does, so he doesn't fight. He just gives me the sad look and takes it all in stride. I never use it as punishment for anything. He only goes in it when I leave, and he has learned to be quiet and calm while in it.

 

6. How much exercise does Bee get? The destructive tendencies make it sound almost like she's bored. I would try taking her on longer walks (or runs). As for the destruction, you could try muzzling her while you're gone or offering something (non-hazardous) for her to shred in her crate PROVIDED THAT SHE DOESN'T EAT IT.

 

Sorry for being long-winded. Hope this helps.

Edited by gecko_foot
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Guest wingo002

Thank you for your help.

 

-All three bites have happened the same way - Bee is on the sofa, i attempt to move her and she snaps at me, very aggressively and without any form of warning. i have small cut today on my cheek from last night's incident. She only bites once or twice (attempting to bite my face or neck) and runs to her bed afterwards. The first time i thought she must have done it because she was asleep and i didn't wake her properly. I know for certain she was awake the second and third time. She was scolded each time with a loud, firm "no". She hasn't required any other discipline that i can think of, she's been easy to train.

 

-Quick, aggressive, snappy bites - more than a playful nip and less than a very aggressive bite

 

-When i'd had her about 6 months, i caught her holding the mouth of a blue heeler shut by biting his muzzle -- that was the only time i've seen her be aggressive towards another dog.

 

-We have a calm household, and Bee has been allowed to progress at her own speed. She didn't being to play with toys and other dogs until two months ago. She likes cheese and rawhides, and she started eating both of those things 3/4 months ago. She spent the first month and a half hiding in her kennel. She still hides from guests, but has warmed up to people she sees often.

 

-Bee is walked three times a day and a on the weekends she runs free on our 40 acre farm -- please note that i don't want to argue the "off leash" point.

 

 

The behavior is puzzling to me because there have been no changes in her environment or schedule.

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Guest mcsheltie

If she were mine she would no longer have couch privileges.

 

I would feed her in her crate. Start giving special high value treats in the crate only. She has to go in to get them and then let her come back out if she wants.

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Guest wingo002

I've been letting her sit on the sofa because it's the only way i can get her to visit with me most nights. If i tell her to get off the sofa, she goes into the bedroom and lays on her bed for the rest of the night. I've tried moving her bed into the living room, and i even gotten an extra bed just for the living room. She's won't use it. I think you're right about the sofa -- is it normal for her to ignore me so much after almost a year? She is always happy when i get home and on our walks. Weekends she runs for awhile then follows me like a shadow, she even follows me while I ride at the barn. But in the evenings, she wants little to do with me.

 

So, put her food bowl in her crate? I tried giving her the rawhide chews she likes while she's in the crate (i did this yesterday) and she won't touch it. Outside of the crate she loves them. I'll try cheese after our lunch walk today.

 

Thank you for your help!

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Teach her "off." Until she learns that command, rather than bending over her or trying to move her physically, clip the leash on her collar (get up and move so you don't have to bend over her), turn away so you're not facing her straight on, give your "off" command, cheerful "Let's go!" and start walking away.

 

Many dogs get frightened if you bend over them, and many don't like being physically moved.

 

It's not too unusual for her to be standoffish in the evening if most of the activity is earlier in the day. Once the day's normal events are over, unless there are signs of something New And Exciting happening, mine are pretty much down for the count too.

Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
We miss Reko Batman (Trouper Zeke x Marque Louisiana), 11/15/95-6/29/06, Rocco the thistledown whippet, 04/29/93-10/14/08, Reko Zema (Mo Kick x Reko Princess), 8/16/98-4/18/10, the most beautiful girl in the whole USA, my good egg Joseph aka Won by a Nose (Oneco Cufflink x Buy Back), 09/22/2003-03/01/2013, and our gentle sweet Gidget (Digitizer, Dodgem by Design x Sobe Mulberry), 1/29/2006-11/22/2014, gone much too soon. Never forgetting CJC's Buckshot, 1/2/07-10/25/10.

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Guest mcsheltie

I would put her bowl in her crate. If she wants to eat, she has to go in. You'll have to find something better than a rawhide. Pieces of real chicken, pizza or something really stinky.

 

It doesn't sound like she is ignoring you. Since she wants to be with you on weekends and loves to see you when she gets home. It sounds like she has just developed a routine that is comfortable to her. If your house allows it you could put up an x-pen in the evenings so she has to stay in the room or even use a leash to establish a new habit. Or go watch TV in the bedroom with her :lol

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Guest hattiepumpkin

Hi,

My adoption place gave us a NILF--Nothing In Life Is Free--pamphlet when we adopted Hattie. Try this link, and if it doesn't work, then google it. http://k9deb.com/nilif.htm Bee definitely seems to have the idea that she belongs on the couch. What everyone else here said is exactly what I was thinking (re-couch privileges, not bending over dog that bites, etc.). Hattie, by the way, developed SEVERE crate hate after we had her 3-4 weeks, so we had to come up with alternate ways to keep her out of trouble. Hattie also ignores us at night. Sometimes she'll come in the room, look at us, and then walk away and go in the other room for the whole night. If she is excited to see you in the afternoon, and she follows you around on the weekends, then she sounds just like my girl!

Good luck. I'm having issues of my own with Hattie now, and this forum is invaluable. Keep going on here for advice!

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Guest gecko_foot

I've been letting her sit on the sofa because it's the only way i can get her to visit with me most nights. If i tell her to get off the sofa, she goes into the bedroom and lays on her bed for the rest of the night. I've tried moving her bed into the living room, and i even gotten an extra bed just for the living room. She's won't use it. I think you're right about the sofa -- is it normal for her to ignore me so much after almost a year? She is always happy when i get home and on our walks. Weekends she runs for awhile then follows me like a shadow, she even follows me while I ride at the barn. But in the evenings, she wants little to do with me.

 

So, put her food bowl in her crate? I tried giving her the rawhide chews she likes while she's in the crate (i did this yesterday) and she won't touch it. Outside of the crate she loves them. I'll try cheese after our lunch walk today.

 

Thank you for your help!

 

I have always fed Tumnus inside his crate more for convenience because he likes to drop his food on the ground before eating it. The bowls hang on the sides of the crate far enough inside that he has to put his front paws in the crate. Since your dog is nervous about the crate, you might try feeding her near the crate first and then progressing slowly into the crate in subsequent feedings once she is comfortable. I don't know if it's the best method, but for me it's a low-stress way to get the dog comfortable with the crate.

 

As to revoking couch privileges, I think that's a good idea. It sounds like Bee is either being possessive of the couch or potentially defensive. It's hard to say without seeing her in action. One thing I want to reiterate is to try not to lean over her when trying to get her to move. If you absolutely have to lean over the dog, make sure she has an exit route. This might make it less scary for her. Any time a dog is defensive or nippy, I would use a leash to move them simply to protect your face. It would probably be a good idea to work on the "move" command in neutral areas so that she can be used to moving away from you when you ask. I've found this command to be very useful when I have a heavy load of groceries or if I need to retrieve Tumnus' bed. By the same token, the "leave it" command would also be useful.

 

Tumnus actually spends most of his time away from me. If I let him, he would spend all of his time in the bathroom. The only reason I don't allow this is because I keep cleaning supplies under the sink. He is essentially limited to the living room. My rescue group told me that the greyhounds are typically aloof, and Tumnus is - at least until I leave the room. I don't think it's abnormal for Bee to ignore you a little bit. Based on what I've heard from other grey owners, it seems to be normal for some of them. I came from a herding dog background, so it was a learning experience for me to have a dog that's not trying to get in my lap all the time.

 

 

I wouldn't worry too much about her not using the beds. Tumnus seems to like the fluffy carpet just as well as he likes the bed.

 

I'll be the last person the flame you about off-leash time on a 40 acre farm. I don't condone it in a city or other places where there is a lot of traffic, but I trust your judgment that your farm is safe (no gopher holes, etc.). I love to watch greyhounds run in safe, open areas - under close supervision, of course.

 

Good luck with Bee!

Edited by gecko_foot
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Guest lasharp1209

Some suggestions:

 

1. Vet check FIRST! If she is in pain or any discomfort that could definitely cause her to be in a bad mood and be snappy - and the urinating in the house could be related. Once you rule out medical issues you can work on behavioral stuff.

2. No couch privileges.

3. If you need to remove her from the couch, use a leash - it may have always bothered her when you physically moved her, and she finally just had enough.

4. Teach some basic obedience - anything - and make her do something before she eats (sit, down, etc.)

5. Same as above with leash walks, if she enjoys them.

6. Back up to Housetraining 101. You don't want it to become a habit. Never let her out of your sight.

7. Babygate to keep her confined to 1-2 rooms (preferably wherever you are) for a week or two - she may need some boundaries and a reminder of who owns the house.

8. As long as she doesn't hurt herself in the crate, just take no nonsense and make her go in. Lead in by the collar, push from behind if you have to.

 

Also consider very carefully whether ANYTHING in the house or the environment has changed recently. Are you working a different schedule, or have you moved furniture around, added any family members (human or furry)? Are YOU extra stressed or worried about anything going on in your life, even seemingly unrelated? Greys are very sensitive and will pick up on your emotions and anything that changes in their environment.

 

I know you want her to snuggle and spend time with you, but you'll have to get these issues worked through first. You may feel like a mean old dog owner for a little while as she adjusts, but be strong and be patient and she'll come around. And you have LOTS of people on this forum who are willing to help you take it one step at a time! Good luck :)

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Guest scfilby

Other people have already given great advice. Greys new to a home often test their boundries after they have had time to settle in and adjust. It is common to hear of a grey snapping while on furniture/beds after 3 months to a year. It happened with both our greys..

 

The best thing you can do is remove the furniture until the hound learns to behave.

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Guest PiagetsMom

I've been letting her sit on the sofa because it's the only way i can get her to visit with me most nights. If i tell her to get off the sofa, she goes into the bedroom and lays on her bed for the rest of the night. I've tried moving her bed into the living room, and i even gotten an extra bed just for the living room. She's won't use it. I think you're right about the sofa -- is it normal for her to ignore me so much after almost a year? She is always happy when i get home and on our walks. Weekends she runs for awhile then follows me like a shadow, she even follows me while I ride at the barn. But in the evenings, she wants little to do with me.

 

 

Neither of my pups have furniture or bed priviledges, but they've also never shown any desire to get on them, so I've just never fixed what ain't broken. But, if they did, and there was snarkiness, they'd definitely be off the furniture.

 

I just want to add that not all pups are "snuggle" pups. Mirage likes very much to lay next to me on the floor, but I've had Piaget for almost 4 years, and she's never been comfortable being that close - she needs her space. I don't take it personally, it's just how she is. She's much more comfortable in her beds, which I have not only in our bedroom, but also have beds in our living room and in our front reading room. It keeps her with us, but gives her the space she needs.

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Guest wingo002

Bee has been easy to train she knows how to walk on a leash, and it only took a few days to teach her how to go up and down stairs. She also knows: lay down, heel, stop, back up, the free command for doing her business on the leash, she comes when called, and typically she listens when i say "get down" - I tried to teach her sit a few months ago and it just seemed to stress her out. Before this month, she'd only had one accident in the house.

 

So, her change in temperate is normal? Is this a boundary testing phase?

 

Her thyroid is the only medical issue she has - she takes a pill twice a day to keep it regulated. Her T4 levels were terribly low, even for a greyhound.

 

At lunch, i took her out then put her back in her crate. She immediately tried to turn around and run out. I held her in and tried to give her a piece of cheese, which she dropped and refused to eat. I shut the front of the crate and she stood pressing her face against the bars(see photo) she stayed in this position until I left.

 

beemad.jpg

 

she used to love her crate

beehappy.jpg

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Guest scfilby

This is the way I look at it..

 

Greys new to a home have never had "things" especially soft comfy things. Pretty soon, after being allowed on the sofa/bed/etc they become possessive. They really really really like the soft wonderful spots and think they own them. When you come and invade their new stuff that they really really like, they get snarky.

 

In both cases with our pups, snarkyness resulted in being banned for a time. When allowed back and more snarkyness, they were banned again. It did not take long for them to get the picture.. The rules are the same for snarkyness to people or each other.. snark and loose the privilege..

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Guest PiagetsMom

I've tried moving her bed into the living room, and i even gotten an extra bed just for the living room. She's won't use it.

 

Sorry, didn't see this before. I had the same problem with Piaget early on in that she seemed to always disappear to the bedroom in the early evening. I did as mcsheltie suggested above, and used the babygate at the bedroom to keep her out with us, and she started using her beds in the family areas instead until we were ready for bed. If it had stressed her in any way, I probably would have just let her have her way, but she settled with the alternative with no problem.

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Guest tinams8

If she were mine she would no longer have couch privileges.

 

I would feed her in her crate. Start giving special high value treats in the crate only. She has to go in to get them and then let her come back out if she wants.

This is exactly what I would do. Also crate her with high value treats and the door shut while you are home for short periods.

 

I guess in the long run it means she is getting comfortable in her new environment, you just need to make sure she doesn't take it too far! B)

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During the first 8 months she was kenneled when i wasn't at home, eventually she was allowed to roam the house. As of this week, she's back in the kennel when I'm not at home, but she doesn't like her kennel any more. She used to go into it all the time, now she runs when i try to put her in it.

 

Is it normal for her to change her opinion of her crate?

 

 

Yes, it is normal. Once they get a taste of freedom, the generally do not want to be crated anymore.

 

According to Lee Livingood, "A crate is an appropriate method for training or when necessary for safety or health reasons. The ultimate goal should be to get the dog trained to the degree that she doesn't need to be crated. If the dog does need to be crated all day for whatever appropriate reason, then someone should come in and give them a break every few hours or so."

 

Jenn

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Guest missecho

Bedroom in the early evening--I think it is a habitual response. At the track the dogs may have been fed at dinner time,and then put in their crates till morning. Molly always finishes her meal, and then heads for the bedroom and snooze time. She may join us on her bed in the living room if we are watching TV, but on many nights, she tucks herself in at about 7 pm.

 

I don't take it personally!

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