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Are Your Greyhound(S) Recall Trained?

Recall  

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  1. 1. Do you teach recall to your greyhounds? If so, are they generally reliable?



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Guest Jubilee251

That's what I thought. Thanks!

 

Sigh...the search for a grassy, fenced area in the city continues... :rolleyes:

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Guest GreysAndMoreGreys

I have a related question - I've been thinking of getting a longgggg leash to work on recall training and also so Molly has more freedom to roam in an unfenced, grassy park. But I can't help thinking that if she takes off in a sprint, reaching the end of the longer leash would hurt or even break her neck.

 

Would this be a bad idea?

I wouldn't totally discount that idea.

But it's not the way to start off on seeing how she will be.

You should start out on a shorter leash and then lengthen it out over the weeks.

Trying to start out on a long line would more then likely be a bad idea.

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Guest LindsaySF

Yes, I teach recall training. Do they always listen? Is their recall reliable? Not really. :lol

 

Rogan almost always comes to me, he is very bonded to me. But he has ignored me a few times, usually when he's sniffing and wants to pee on something. rolleyes.gif Heidi actually recalls the best, but I think that's just because she wants to, because she loves being petted. :) Honey sometimes acts a little spooky in the yard, or she tries to play a game of chase me. Sophie follows me everywhere, she's usually up my butt, but if she is at the other end of the yard she doesn't always come when called. Teagan hears me call, and never comes. lol.gif Aidan and Cody recall pretty well, they think they will get food (they are very food motivated). Clancy usually comes, it depends if he's preoccupied with something or not. He will always come if he actually sees food.

 

The only place I have tested their recall outside of a securely fenced area would be at LGRA racing. Teagan and Rogan are too busy "killing" the lure at the end to hear anything (and calling them off the lure can sometimes work against you, you don't want to affect their drive/desire for that lure). Honey has done LGRA practices and she stops once the lure stops, and she comes to me when I call her. I don't think she would come to anyone else, and if she were spooked or loose under other circumstances forget it! (This is the dog we needed to use a live trap to catch).

 

 

 

~Lindsay~

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HAHAHAHAHA

 

No. As a matter of fact, I'm lucky if they even LOOK @ me when I call them.

 

They're like big long-legged, pointy-nosed cats, actually.

 

:)


Laurie

**& Angels Emily, Beatrice, Okie, Rhemus ,Vixen, and Rose-always in my heart**

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Guest Drumhellergrey

How long of a leash are you talking about? I ask because a Flexi-leash is, in my opinion, way to long for a grey.A 12 ft lead is not going to harm the dog if caution is used.

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Guest gecko_foot

Mine is more or less reliable, but then I'm a little biased. Tumnus is quite people-oriented and follows me most of the time. Even so, I rarely let him off leash just to be safe and only inside a fenced-in area or on a large piece (15+ acres) of open, rural land (in 80 degree F weather). It's nice to let Tumnus have some free time, but I agree with everyone who says it's a gamble.

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They have a reasonable recall, both boys did great at training class and would always bound across the hall to us, but it was trickier outside and they still need to do more work when there's distractions.

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blue and millie are quite reliable within the house or yard, if awake. millie a bit less so than blue out in the fenced paddock nearby. both do try to stay within a reasonable distance from me and will come running if i head for the gate to leave. all bets are off if another dog or some wildlife joins us.

 

however, if you call them by their real names they come running at top speed 99.999%* of the time. (they both think their real name is 'sausages' since i frequently buy small cocktail sausages for doggy super-treats)

 

*- i allowed .001% for possible failure justincase i'm more than a mile away, and they are asleep while i whisper that word. they also are partially telepathic in that they can tell from the beds upstairs when i open the fridge and reach for said sausages in lieu of something designated notfordoggies, if i turn around just before my fingers hit the sausages, they are behind me. if i instead turn around just before grabbing a beer, they are not there.

Edited by kronckew

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Yes, I always recall train mine and yes they have very reliable recall, although some have taken more work than others to get there. My first greyhound was such a poppet that he barely needed any recall training at all. My second was more of a challenge as he was quite keen on chasing rabbits initially.

 

Sunny and Sophie have both been quite easy. Sunny is generally pretty lazy although he does love to run so he's a bit "all or nothing" when out on a walk - we are very lucky to have access to many acres of fenced-in countryside to walk in. We always walk for at least 20 minutes on lead to give them a chance to warm up and then Sunny generally likes to have a big, long run fairly soon after being let off the lead but then for the rest of the walk he pretty much plods along close to me. He's unusual for a boy dog in that he's not really interested in sniffing much, and he's not into chasing either, and we don't walk off-lead if there are other people or dogs about. In fact, these days it's difficult to find an opportunity to recall Sunny because, apart from when he's running one of his big circles, he's never far from me. If we want to practice recall with Sunny whilst out on a walk we usually have to manufacture a situation. Sometimes, when he's doing one of his big circles, if I think he's getting too far away I'll whistle once and he'll immediately start to turn. He is a very good boy :) .

 

Sophie is my little recall superstar, though :angel. She's not into running like Sunny is, although she will chase him if he runs. She's an incredibly curious dog though so what she enjoys on her walks is scampering around investigating every rabbit hole, every branch etc etc, and if there's a rabbit or pheasant to chase so much the better, but she's also very biddable and comes instantly at top speed whenever recalled and she does it with such a happy bounce and smile too! Recalls are a very exciting part of our walks for Sophie because she LOVES her yummy treats.

 

I have put in many hours (a few minutes at a time) and a great deal of thought into recall training them over the last three years (not that they have any idea they are being trained - to them it is just a very exciting enjoyable game) but it is SO worth it. We practice recall every day at random times in the house and in the garden and every time there is a stampede to see who can get to me fastest for the treats - they get several delicious treats every single time (chicken, beef, liver, sausage, cheese). After 40 years of dog-ownership and attending many training courses, I have given up on the traditional methods of recall training (with short or long leads etc), and instead concentrate on finding ways to make my greyhounds think that the recall cue is the most exciting sound in the world!


SunnySophiePegsdon.jpg

When a relationship of love is disrupted, the relationship does not cease. The love continues; therefore, the relationship continues. The work of grief is to reconcile and redeem life to a different love relationship. ~ W Scott Lineberry

Always Greyhounds Home Boarding and Greyhounds With Love House Sitting

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We trained Capri with high-value treats and occasional use of the squirrel call gadget we got when we adopted her. She's pretty reliable in the back yard. We also play hide and seek in the house with treats and toys so I *think* she'd be reliable in any situation. Because we made recall training so fun, she never just walks to us, she RUNS. However, we've never yet had an opportunity to really test her because we don't let her off-leash outside of a fenced area.


Sharon, Capri, Loki, Ajax (bridge angel) and Sweetie Pie (cat)

 

Visit Sit. Stay Safe! by Something Special Pet Supplies for muzzles and other dog safety products

:gh_bow

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Guest mountain4greys

I put no. And the reason is, I'm not going to take that chance when "trust" is a deadly disease. Wouldn't want to live with that.

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Trust: A Deadly Disease

 

If you haven't read this, you probably should.

Edited by laurie

Laurie

**& Angels Emily, Beatrice, Okie, Rhemus ,Vixen, and Rose-always in my heart**

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Guest Drumhellergrey

Trust: A Deadly Disease

 

If you haven't read this, you probably should.

It is a fine article. I do take offense at trust being labeled a disease though.

 

Diseases can have a cure, but this article is implying that you can never trust your dog.

 

I once again want to go on record in Stating that I DO NOT recommend to everyone who owns a Greyhound try their dog off leash. :)

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I put no. And the reason is, I'm not going to take that chance when "trust" is a deadly disease. Wouldn't want to live with that.

 

But if training a dog to a recall - or even working on the basics - in a controlled area (fenced, inside etc) can help if the worse happens, why not even try? I see it as a tool in my arsenal of protecting my dog along with a leash, micro chip, tag collar, etc.

 

I certainly understand that not all dogs will react to a recall, only do it occasionally, etc - but I am truly stunned at those who don't even bother to try. Trust is an issue, but so is hubris.

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Mine will come back to me every time in areas they're already familiar with. If I take them somewhere new, forget it.


| Rachel | Dewty, Trigger, and Charlotte | Missing Dazzle, Echo, and Julio |

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Learn what your greyhound's life was like before becoming part of yours!
"The only thing better than the cutest kitty in the world is any dog." -Daniel Tosh

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Guest FastDogsOwnMe

Why would you not train a recall? Even if you will NEVER let your dogs off leash, isn't it still a great safety net and back up plan, as well as a useful command around the house, at play groups, etc?

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Yes, absolutely. Recall training is done with every dog I have & it continues throughout their lifetime. My training ability is far from stellar & my level of success varies with the dog but I continue this training with every dog I have, always striving for improvement. Is this because I let them off leash in unfenced areas? No. I do this because sh!t happens.

 

It matters not whether you faithfully observe the "on leash or in a secured area" rule 100% of the time. We cannot control every variable. Are you perfect? I most certainly am not. I realize that despite my best efforts sometime, somewhere, something will happen & I will have a loose hound if only for a few seconds. At this point, a reliable recall can prevent disaster. Even if you only have reliable recall within 6-8 feet of you, meaning the distance of the average leash plus your arm's length, you could save your dog's life if the leash is dropped, pulled for your hand or the clasp fails. And that short recall training could translate to a longer distance recall for that one time when the unthinkable happens.

 

Every dog regardless of breed, age, health status or living conditions needs to learn a recall. If you teach your dog nothing, please teach them recall. Their lives could depend on it. Though of course the ultimate goal is near 100% reliabilty, do not worry about whether you think you can achieve that. A 50% reliable recall has the potential to get your dog back 1 out of 2 times. That is huge compared to no recall at all. Just get started on training & work on continued improvement over time. Don't have a big area? Don't worry about that either. Multiple short distance recalls, even just 1-2 feet away, repeated several times a day over the course of weeks adds up to a conditioned response that will amaze you. Trust me on this. Haven't convinced you yet? Well, just give it a try. You've nothing to loose but a few treats down a happy hound's gullet.

 

Though a reliable recall is seriously needed, the training is fun & rewarding for both hound & human. Here are a few sites to get your started:

 

Kathy Sdao's Reliable recall articles:

First steps http://www.kathysdao.com/articles/The_First_Steps_to_Teaching_a_Reliable_Recall.html

More advanced http://www.kathysdao.com/articles/More_on_the_Reliable_Recall.html

(My most recent trainer said this is the method, both articles, she has had the most success with.)

 

 

Here is one trainer's short cut version of Pam Dennison's "Really Reliable Recall" http://dogdaysusa.com/comeherenow.html

(Initially I even used a short cut of this short cut & got a rather decent recall but went back & did the original short cut version to solidify things. Never did Pam's full version. Just not that disciplined.)

 

Here is an article from Pam Dennison herself http://www.positivedogs.com/articles/fido_come_home.html

 

Here is Shirly Chong's "Recall Redux", part of her "Shirley's Six Lessons" http://www.shirleychong.com/keepers/Lesson6.html

 

Happy recalling!! And stay safe out there.

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Trust: A Deadly Disease

 

If you haven't read this, you probably should.

 

I have read this article several times over the years and it is a good reminder not to become complacent where your dog's safety is concerned. Personally I would never take any of the risks mentioned in that article. Just because someone takes the trouble to train a reliable recall in their dogs does not imply that they trust them to the point of carelessness.


SunnySophiePegsdon.jpg

When a relationship of love is disrupted, the relationship does not cease. The love continues; therefore, the relationship continues. The work of grief is to reconcile and redeem life to a different love relationship. ~ W Scott Lineberry

Always Greyhounds Home Boarding and Greyhounds With Love House Sitting

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I've taught recall to both our greys. In the house, it works (so far) 100%. Outside if they want to listen, it works 100%. But if they don't want to listen or are bewitched by a bunny, squirrel, sunlight, an ant....then no. I'm too scared to ever let them off leash outside of the fenced yard (even tho we live in the country) and hope the recall works. I've seen how focused they can become on something and then I don't even exist to them.

 

Connie

 

 

 

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Guest Swifthounds

Why would you not train a recall? Even if you will NEVER let your dogs off leash, isn't it still a great safety net and back up plan, as well as a useful command around the house, at play groups, etc?

 

 

Yes, absolutely. Recall training is done with every dog I have & it continues throughout their lifetime. My training ability is far from stellar & my level of success varies with the dog but I continue this training with every dog I have, always striving for improvement. Is this because I let them off leash in unfenced areas? No. I do this because sh!t happens. It matters not whether you faithfully observe the "on leash or in a secured area" rule 100% of the time. We cannot control every variable. Are you perfect? I most certainly am not. I realize that despite my best efforts sometime, somewhere, something will happen & I will have a loose hound if only for a few seconds. At this point, a reliable recall can prevent disaster. Even if you only have reliable recall within 6-8 feet of you, meaning the distance of the average leash plus your arm's length, you could save your dog's life if the leash is dropped, pulled for your hand or the clasp fails. And that short recall training could translate to a longer distance recall for that one time when the unthinkable happens.Every dog regardless of breed, age, health status or living conditions needs to learn a recall. If you teach your dog nothing, please teach them recall. Their lives could depend on it. Though of course the ultimate goal is near 100% reliabilty, do not worry about whether you think you can achieve that. A 50% reliable recall has the potential to get your dog back 1 out of 2 times. That is huge compared to no recall at all. Just get started on training & work on continued improvement over time. Don't have a big area? Don't worry about that either. Multiple short distance recalls, even just 1-2 feet away, repeated several times a day over the course of weeks adds up to a conditioned response that will amaze you. Trust me on this. Haven't convinced you yet? Well, just give it a try. You've nothing to loose but a few treats down a happy hound's gullet.Though a reliable recall is seriously needed, the training is fun & rewarding for both hound & human. Here are a few sites to get your started:Kathy Sdao's Reliable recall articles:First steps http://www.kathysdao.com/articles/The_First_Steps_to_Teaching_a_Reliable_Recall.htmlMore advanced http://www.kathysdao.com/articles/More_on_the_Reliable_Recall.html(My most recent trainer said this is the method, both articles, she has had the most success with.)Here is one trainer's short cut version of Pam Dennison's "Really Reliable Recall" http://dogdaysusa.com/comeherenow.html (Initially I even used a short cut of this short cut & got a rather decent recall but went back & did the original short cut version to solidify things. Never did Pam's full version. Just not that disciplined.)Here is an article from Pam Dennison herself http://www.positivedogs.com/articles/fido_come_home.htmlHere is Shirly Chong's "Recall Redux", part of her "Shirley's Six Lessons" http://www.shirleychong.com/keepers/Lesson6.htmlHappy recalling!! And stay safe out there.

 

I wholeheartedly agree with the above. I started this poll after seeing the thread regarding hounds off leash. I have to say that as much as folks were critical of those who expressed that they do have occasions where they allow their hounds off leash in certain conditions in the other thread, it seems to me that what's so dangerous among greyhound adopters is the ignorance, not the trust.

 

Those critical of another's choices with their hounds point to trust as a "disease" and highlight a few specific instances where dogs allowed off leash have met with ill fates (though in almost all, there were more deadly factors involved than that the dog wasn't on leash).

 

I started this thread because I've looked for many a lost/loose greyhound in my zillion (OK, not that many, but enough for it to make me feel old) years in greyhounds and not one of them was a hound that was allowed off leash in the types of situations recalled here and in the off-leash thread. All of them were dogs who escaped from cars, gates, or yards. A LOT of them were not dogs new to their home.

 

I was a bit puzzled until I started this thread and realized how many people do NOT work on recall with their greyhounds. There are things in the care of greyhounds that I feel very strongly about (tooth/gum health, nail trimming, healthy weight, training, manners, proper diet), but none so important as recall training. To learn recall a dog must know it's name, must know come, and wait/stay. Some will take to it better than others. Some naturally recall and others are tempted by other things. You can teach a dog anything if you do it in a positive way, make it fun, and are a reliable leader. That some hounds will never be as reliable as others is IMO a poor reason not to try.

 

A dog that understands recall isn't just a dog that is easier to live with and manage (honestly, in a large fenced field, do you really walk over to fetch your dog?) - it's a dog with a better chance of survival should the dog get loose. I leash walk my dogs. Try as I might to keep them on leash and under leash control, a myriad of things can occur to throw that into chaos. Hence, my dogs are trained in recall, conditioned not to run when a leash is dropped, trained to wait until told they may pass through a gate or exit the car. It's nice to think that a leash gives you control over a dog, but the control it gives is finite, and not nearly as reliable as we might wish. Should the unexpected occur, why not give your hound and yourself the best tools possible for handling the situation?

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Guest Drumhellergrey

Why would you not train a recall? Even if you will NEVER let your dogs off leash, isn't it still a great safety net and back up plan, as well as a useful command around the house, at play groups, etc?

 

 

Yes, absolutely. Recall training is done with every dog I have & it continues throughout their lifetime. My training ability is far from stellar & my level of success varies with the dog but I continue this training with every dog I have, always striving for improvement. Is this because I let them off leash in unfenced areas? No. I do this because sh!t happens. It matters not whether you faithfully observe the "on leash or in a secured area" rule 100% of the time. We cannot control every variable. Are you perfect? I most certainly am not. I realize that despite my best efforts sometime, somewhere, something will happen & I will have a loose hound if only for a few seconds. At this point, a reliable recall can prevent disaster. Even if you only have reliable recall within 6-8 feet of you, meaning the distance of the average leash plus your arm's length, you could save your dog's life if the leash is dropped, pulled for your hand or the clasp fails. And that short recall training could translate to a longer distance recall for that one time when the unthinkable happens.Every dog regardless of breed, age, health status or living conditions needs to learn a recall. If you teach your dog nothing, please teach them recall. Their lives could depend on it. Though of course the ultimate goal is near 100% reliabilty, do not worry about whether you think you can achieve that. A 50% reliable recall has the potential to get your dog back 1 out of 2 times. That is huge compared to no recall at all. Just get started on training & work on continued improvement over time. Don't have a big area? Don't worry about that either. Multiple short distance recalls, even just 1-2 feet away, repeated several times a day over the course of weeks adds up to a conditioned response that will amaze you. Trust me on this. Haven't convinced you yet? Well, just give it a try. You've nothing to loose but a few treats down a happy hound's gullet.Though a reliable recall is seriously needed, the training is fun & rewarding for both hound & human. Here are a few sites to get your started:Kathy Sdao's Reliable recall articles:First steps http://www.kathysdao.com/articles/The_First_Steps_to_Teaching_a_Reliable_Recall.htmlMore advanced http://www.kathysdao.com/articles/More_on_the_Reliable_Recall.html(My most recent trainer said this is the method, both articles, she has had the most success with.)Here is one trainer's short cut version of Pam Dennison's "Really Reliable Recall" http://dogdaysusa.com/comeherenow.html (Initially I even used a short cut of this short cut & got a rather decent recall but went back & did the original short cut version to solidify things. Never did Pam's full version. Just not that disciplined.)Here is an article from Pam Dennison herself http://www.positivedogs.com/articles/fido_come_home.htmlHere is Shirly Chong's "Recall Redux", part of her "Shirley's Six Lessons" http://www.shirleychong.com/keepers/Lesson6.htmlHappy recalling!! And stay safe out there.

 

I wholeheartedly agree with the above. I started this poll after seeing the thread regarding hounds off leash. I have to say that as much as folks were critical of those who expressed that they do have occasions where they allow their hounds off leash in certain conditions in the other thread, it seems to me that what's so dangerous among greyhound adopters is the ignorance, not the trust.

 

Those critical of another's choices with their hounds point to trust as a "disease" and highlight a few specific instances where dogs allowed off leash have met with ill fates (though in almost all, there were more deadly factors involved than that the dog wasn't on leash).

 

I started this thread because I've looked for many a lost/loose greyhound in my zillion (OK, not that many, but enough for it to make me feel old) years in greyhounds and not one of them was a hound that was allowed off leash in the types of situations recalled here and in the off-leash thread. All of them were dogs who escaped from cars, gates, or yards. A LOT of them were not dogs new to their home.

 

I was a bit puzzled until I started this thread and realized how many people do NOT work on recall with their greyhounds. There are things in the care of greyhounds that I feel very strongly about (tooth/gum health, nail trimming, healthy weight, training, manners, proper diet), but none so important as recall training. To learn recall a dog must know it's name, must know come, and wait/stay. Some will take to it better than others. Some naturally recall and others are tempted by other things. You can teach a dog anything if you do it in a positive way, make it fun, and are a reliable leader. That some hounds will never be as reliable as others is IMO a poor reason not to try.

 

A dog that understands recall isn't just a dog that is easier to live with and manage (honestly, in a large fenced field, do you really walk over to fetch your dog?) - it's a dog with a better chance of survival should the dog get loose. I leash walk my dogs. Try as I might to keep them on leash and under leash control, a myriad of things can occur to throw that into chaos. Hence, my dogs are trained in recall, conditioned not to run when a leash is dropped, trained to wait until told they may pass through a gate or exit the car. It's nice to think that a leash gives you control over a dog, but the control it gives is finite, and not nearly as reliable as we might wish. Should the unexpected occur, why not give your hound and yourself the best tools possible for handling the situation?

Both of these posts are my thoughts, exactly. Thank you both for posting, and swifthounds for starting this important thread. :) TY... TY.. TY...and off he goes into the distant shadows...lol

Edited by Drumhellergrey

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Guest FastDogsOwnMe

Yup, Swifthounds, as usual, I fully agree with every word!

 

PS long toenails are a major peeve of mine... OCD :lol Right up there with fat hounds and hounds without muscle tone

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Guest gecko_foot

Yup, Swifthounds, as usual, I fully agree with every word!

 

PS long toenails are a major peeve of mine... OCD :lol Right up there with fat hounds and hounds without muscle tone

 

:nod:nod:nod :nod

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Guest GreysAndMoreGreys

Jennifer, perfectly stated :thumbs-up

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