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Cats In The Garden


Guest sal
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hi, well there are 4 cats that like to come into my garden regularly, so I walk out with muzzle on my dog holding her collar until they have gone under the fence and out of harms way. Only problem is the cats are getting a bit too confident because so far they have not been hurt and the dog hasn't chased them, well maybe one but that one is the bravest and they keep coming back (she made it out in plenty of time). They dont even shoot off under the fence anymore they will walk towards us until I stamp my feet at them. Anyone else have this problem? In a way I wonder if I should let her chase them out with her muzzle on but im affraid they will still get hurt. Just letting her out for a pee is becoming very time consuming since it gets her all razzed up and she runs around sniffing for them before she will go.

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Guest krystolla

From what I understand, dogs can still catch and even kill through a muzzle. I'd suggest that you go for a more traditional cat deterrent, something like a water gun, and use that to clear the yard prior to letting your dog out. If the cats aren't in the yard or running out of the yard before she comes out she shouldn't so wound up.

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Guest kahjul

We live in a tract home and bring the dogs in at night. That leaves the sand dog run 'free' to the many neighbor kitties. First, let me say, we are not kittie people, we are doggie people, even good kitties are only kinda cute for a minute. Bad kitties that poop in my yard, walk on my car and stare at my dogs while they bark their fool heads off are never cute at all. We ran a pet voltage (farily low, wouldn't work on horses type) electric fence and ran a single string along the top. Patched up where the kitties came in down low and -viola! a completely kitty free zone. You could run the fence down low too, but then it's in kid/dog range.

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lol electric fence sounds harsh but good idea, better than the cats getting ripped up. Ill start with the water gun I think. I love cats I have had them all my life, sal is my first dog never mind first greyhound. Ill be apologising while I squirt them lol

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This probably won't be popular, but I think the cats need to learn to be very afraid, and the fastest, most effective deterrent is for them to be chased.

 

I'd try to scare the cats with a loud noise, then let the muzzled dog chase after the cats are safely near the fence.

 

Or, I'd use the squirt gun to get them running away, and then let the muzzled dog out when they're safely near the fence.

 

Why? Because by holding the dog back, the cats are learning not to be afraid of the dog, and that the yard is safe territory. Some day, this will end in disaster -- the collar will slip, your hand will slip, a dogsitter will forget, something.

 

We had the same problem with our neighbor's cats, and we couldn't see all of our yard to know whether they were in the yard or not before letting him out. After Kipper started darting out the back door in hot pursuit of anything in the yard (he does that even when it's empty), they've learned.

 

They now seem to just pass through, and not linger. That's a major change from their behavior with our previous dog-safe greyhound or in the months between dogs.

 

I am not advocating an attempt to let your dog catch a cat. But I do believe that the fastest way for the cat to learn not to treat your yard as their safe personal space is for the dog to become a major scary threat.

gallery_17468_3098_7486.jpg
Dash (Mega Batboy), & forever missing Kipper (RD's Kiper, 2006-2015) & Souldog Dune (Pazzo Otis, 1994-2008)
"..cherish him and give him place with yourself for the rest of his but too short life. It is his one drawback. He should live as long as his owner."
James Matheson, The Greyhound: Breeding, Coursing, Racing, etc., 1929

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Yeah we have quite a few neighbours cats that like to sit or cut through our garden (and crap in it :angryfire). I always take the dogs out on lead anyway before letting the run as the garden is sort of fenced separate to the house and sometimes i just want the dogs to do their business not play, so the cats are generally safe. We seem to have a lot of stupid, suicidal cats in our neighbourhood that are unaware of danger of dogs, like yesterday one followed DBF and the dogs and tried to come into the house with them :eek DBF thankfully was able to shut the door before the dogs could get it.

 

Often the cats will take off as soon as they see the dogs, but some cocky ones just sit staring or slowly saunter off so i can see the advantage of Dunesmom's suggestion of leaving a lasting impression of danger. My granddad throws tennis balls at the ones that cross his garden as they dig his plants up, but they still go into the garden just run if they see him :lol .

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Guest jaws4evr

I don't think letting the muzzled dog go for the cat would be a bad idea, IF you're sure the cat can get out in time. Having the cat experience a bit of fear from the dog, in a relatively safe context, might just save it's life the next time it encounters your dog, or another dog.

 

Could you put some chicken wire or something to keep the cats from getting in the hole?

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Guest kydie

I am pretty sure the hound will still get the cat through that muzzle :nod so if that is your plan be prepared for blood an guts :sick . I use a pump up water gun, you know the kind the kids use with a water pack?, to remove various critters, from around the buildings, so when they hear your door open they will learn to scram :colgate

Edited by kydie
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Guest jettcricket

This probably won't be popular, but I think the cats need to learn to be very afraid, and the fastest, most effective deterrent is for them to be chased.

 

I'd try to scare the cats with a loud noise, then let the muzzled dog chase after the cats are safely near the fence.

 

Or, I'd use the squirt gun to get them running away, and then let the muzzled dog out when they're safely near the fence.

 

Why? Because by holding the dog back, the cats are learning not to be afraid of the dog, and that the yard is safe territory. Some day, this will end in disaster -- the collar will slip, your hand will slip, a dogsitter will forget, something.

 

We had the same problem with our neighbor's cats, and we couldn't see all of our yard to know whether they were in the yard or not before letting him out. After Kipper started darting out the back door in hot pursuit of anything in the yard (he does that even when it's empty), they've learned.

 

They now seem to just pass through, and not linger. That's a major change from their behavior with our previous dog-safe greyhound or in the months between dogs.

 

I am not advocating an attempt to let your dog catch a cat. But I do believe that the fastest way for the cat to learn not to treat your yard as their safe personal space is for the dog to become a major scary threat.

 

I'm a cat lover and I agree.....I honestly don't know why people allow their cats to roam to begin with. Too many dangers.

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Guest happygrey

 

I'm a cat lover and I agree.....I honestly don't know why people allow their cats to roam to begin with. Too many dangers.

 

No kidding! I grew up with a lot of indoor/outdoor cats but I'd never let them out now. First off, we have a real coyote problem in this area and they sure love to eat cats (and small dogs) and have been known to snatch them off of people's porches. Second, even when I was young, we lost many of our cats due to being run over and one just vanished (probably became someone's meal :( ). Anyway, if I had cats now, they'd be strictly indoor. I really don't know why people let them roam. They are also a major threat to the songbird population. :(

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I'm moving house in a month or so, so I will get a big watergun and start shooting some cats as soon as we move in. fresh start and no overconfident cats. All ready to bring in a new greyhound yey!

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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

We live in a tract home and bring the dogs in at night. That leaves the sand dog run 'free' to the many neighbor kitties. First, let me say, we are not kittie people, we are doggie people, even good kitties are only kinda cute for a minute. Bad kitties that poop in my yard, walk on my car and stare at my dogs while they bark their fool heads off are never cute at all. We ran a pet voltage (farily low, wouldn't work on horses type) electric fence and ran a single string along the top. Patched up where the kitties came in down low and -viola! a completely kitty free zone. You could run the fence down low too, but then it's in kid/dog range.

 

 

So by your statement does it mean you leave your dogs outside all day long, and bring them in at night?

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oy, those cats in the garden are a real problem. a good friend who has 4 greys has been dealing w/ that problem. well, it has subsided since 2 of the greys got the cat- and nearly ripped it apart. well, the cat survived, one grey had a nasty bite, the other good scratches but that cat has not returned...since. prior to the double grey attach the same cat was terriorizing the dogs, one ran after it into the gate, bent the bar holding the fence in place and really scratched himself up and skinned his head under the chain link fencing and ripped up his hocks stopping. it took a good month or more for the poor pup to heal. it seems as if only an attack will send it on it's merry way unfortantely.

 

i had ferrel cats in my yard when my terriers were alive. they used to jump the fence to escape, lucky it was years ago with slower dogs or i would have contended w/ the same situation as my friend. i used to scatter dehydrated coyote urine around the property, it was really bad at one point, a neighbor was feeding the ferrel cats and a litter was born in her garage. i also remember using moth balls as well. i got the dehyrdrated urine at a good garden center, i'm sure you can find it on line.

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Guest Brindled_Greys

We had a lot of cat traffic before we got our Greys. It only took a couple of close calls to the fence, and things quieted down in a hurry!

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