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Guest NdlNses

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Guest NdlNses

With our Boo boy, the newest addition *1 year* we have some problems. We were always used to letting our other dogs sleep on our bed or furniture if they wanted. It never occured that it might be an issue since we never had any bad behavior from our girls. Our senior who would always sleep in the same room, now goes to a bed in another room. Boo just began growling and bearing his teeth- at me too. It's hard when my fiancee is away for work, because he responds more to a 'masculine voice'. When I tell him to get down or even move in a way he doesn't like, (sleep aggression?) Boo will growl and has bitten me.

 

Now I am not allowing him to sleep on the bed. Despite the whining that keeps me up. I don't want our girl to be timid. She loved spending time with both of us, now she's hiding.

 

We've been told there really isn't any training for how he has always behaved outside with other dogs. Most dogs he will bark at, not in a friendly way- he's on a harness. He will get along with Greyhounds if the situation isn't anxious and they're calm. We were told he would calm down in time, being compared to other Greyhounds. And 'socializing' etc. wouldn't help, just time.

 

In the meantime, I hope time does work and I can make better decisions, I'd love any help or tips.

Edited by NdlNses
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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

First of all, WHO is telling you there is nothing you can do? There is allways something you can do. There is allways training techniques to help with poor behavior. It sounds as if you have a couple issues that are going on here.

 

The bed issue: You havent really given a lot of info, but piecing things together it sounds as if your new boy is on your bed and growls at your other hounds as well as you when he is on the bed. This sounds like typical resource guarding.

 

What is usually suggested is first take away the resource that he is attempting to guard (no more bed for him), then show him where he fits in the household. If a hound is resource guarding with a human, that is because he/she does not see the human as above him/her. You need to fix this issue. A few suggestions: I say this a lot around here, hand-feed your hound. When you hand-feed your hound you accomplish a few things, first you and the hound bond very quickly. Secondly your hound instinctually understands that the hand that feeds is higher up the food chain from him, so he should not challenge your authority. Another suggestion to help is NILF training (Nothing In Life is Free), basically your hound has to earn EVERYTHING. Earn petting by doing something asked of the hound, meaning you do not go to him to pet, he comes to you for attention. Basic obedience class is another good thing to do. You can couple basic obedience with NILF and that should dramatically improve his "listening" skills when you tell him to get off the bed. Will this help stop him from growling at the other hounds, probably not, BUT when YOU tell him to stop growling, he should respect that, and in time will learn to accept other hounds in what he thinks is his space. I have a boy that from time to time needs to be reminded that he is NOT the one that gets to growl at other hounds, thats MY job.

 

The other issue you bring up with being other breed reactive. This takes a different method. To help with this you need to do desensitization training with him. You need to walk him where he can see other dogs, and monitor his every twitch, snort, movement. What you are looking for is the second he starts to tense up, you need to remove him from the situation. Remember how close he was when he started to get tense, then the next time, give a treat just BEFORE he reaches that point, and is still calm. You will need to repeat this step over and over until you can continue to get closer and closer to the other dog. Eventually when you can get within about 10 feet of another dog, you then switch to parallel walking and still treating for calm behavior. Once the parallel walking is no problem, THEN you can introduce him. The correct way for introductions should be walking nose to butt in an arc. They should not be introduced nose to nose - this is a sign of agression, but unfortunately humans get involved and force our method of meeting (face to face with a handshake) on our hounds. This issue would be better for you to find a trainer that is familiar with the greyhound breed (to help determine the cause of the anxiety) so that an appropriate training method can be used to help desensitize him. The method I explained is only one of many that can be used.

 

Maybe someone else will have some suggestions on ways to help, but believe me, it is NOT something that you have to deal with. I am sorry someone gave you that advice. Good job finding this site, there are many many people here than can help.

 

Chad

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How are you getting him off the bed? Speaking to him? Pulling on his collar? It's best to be matter-of-fact with him. He jumps on, you leash him up and lead him down. Do this every time. Take him to where you'd prefer he'd be and (maybe) give a treat. Repeat, repeat, repeat.

 

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Guest NdlNses

He almost always gets on the bed when I'm on. If I leave- then he'll get off. Our first girl is at the bridge, so Kailey is the other hound besides Boo. He has never bitten her, but me, yes. So I gave him the crate last night.

Kailey still went to her usual newer space where he doesn't go.

 

I've tried giving treats on walks, and firmly giving commands, making him heel (and he will, until another dog comes)- he seems determined to go crazy at other dogs.

 

 

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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

Ok, you didnt understand me. You need to remove him BEFORE he gets out of control, not after (if you wait until after he starts to get excited you have already lost the battle as he is no longer paying attention to anything you are trying to communicate to him). You need to determine at what point he crosses over from walking nicely to crazy dog. If you miss the line and he starts getting excited, you need to turn him around and get him calm again before you attempt to move towards another dog again.

 

So what does "gave him the crate" mean?

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Guest jenznaz

First off, I'm sorry you've been bitten, that's rough. Sounds like Boo thinks he's the boss. I would give you the advice to

 

a.) prepare yourself for A LOT of hard work coming up if you want to establish a leadership role with Boo.

b.) you're not alone, and there is something you can do! pick up a book! I love Patricia McConnel (http://www.patriciamcconnell.com/) she has a nice little booklet called, "How To Be The Leader Of The Pack, And Have Your Dog Love You For It!"

c.) please use his muzzle that hopefully you were given when you adopted him. It will make you feel more confident that you won't be bitten again when you have to discipline Boo.

 

Let us know how it's going...

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Guest NdlNses

I haven't allowed him to sleep on the bed since, I've just had him go in his crate.

Thank you for the book rec.- I will look into it.

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Guest kydie

I agree with Greyt_Dog_Lover, you need to back up and punt, meaning start over with more control of this, and never back away,

I am sorry you have ben bitten, but don't let this stop you from gaining control. Good Luck

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Guest SusanP

If he's crating at night with no problem, that sounds like a step in the right direction. With a dog that bites, it's safest to muzzle (Does he have a basket muzzle from the adoption group?) and/or to remove him from the bed using a leash if he does get up there, so you are not getting your hands close. Is he obeying you about keeping off the bed now?

 

I worry about your other pup. Have you been able to get her back to your bed where she used to sleep? I'm wondering if this dog has behaved this way since you got him a year ago, or is it very new, and did it start suddenly? If it's new, I wonder what has triggered it. Others here may have more ideas than I do.

 

It might be easier for you to focus on the bed issue first and then get a handle on the leash aggression, which may be a harder problem to tackle, once that is under control. Sometimes when a dog has multiple behavior problems, it gets so overwhelming trying to deal with them all at once.

 

Do you use a basket muzzle on walks? Does your fiancee ever walk this dog, and how does he respond to his behavior toward other dogs? Is it a new behavior, or did he come to you a year ago acting like this?

Edited by SusanP
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Guest NdlNses

We do have a basket muzzle, yes. He cries/whines when he has it on. He doesn't like it. On walks we don't use it. Maybe we should. We get enough stupid questions of "Ohh isn't that one of those dogs that loves to race/run?". We also have the problem of some just not leashing their dogs and twice small dogs tried to snap at Boo. Maybe it's my fault.

 

He did have these issues since we adopted him. Both of us agreed he needed some time to settle in. And we both did get to a point of concern. My fiancee researched training, there weren't any familiar with Greyhounds close to where I am. He stumbled on one that required leaving the dog for a certain time and we were against it.

 

I think Boo listens better than before, but gee it would help if I had my husband's masculine tone when I were telling him things.

 

My sweet girl did come back--but I saw her sniffing at Boo's large crate. He doesn't want company in there and gave a noise to let her know.

 

 

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